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Full text of "Sponsor"



4 



* 



NATIONAL BROADGAST1NG COMPANY, Inc. 

GENERAL LIBRARY 
30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, N. Y. 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/sponsor4849spon 



NOVEMBER 1948 • 50c a copy 



"New name for Spot" winners announced— p. 33 
Station managers' lament— p. 25 
TV Trends-p. 76 
What's on the 4 Networks— p. 83 









Jack Smart, "The Fat Man," lives up to his title — p. 38 




mm: 




The days of the covered wagon are gone, 

but in the field of commercial broadcasting the 

time for pioneering is now. 

Someone must blaze the trail. 

In Richmond that someone is the Havens and Martin group 

of stations — WMBG, the NBC station; 

WTVR, the NBC-TV affiliate, WCOD, the FM station. 

In 1944 a full page newspaper advertisement heralded 
WMBG's faith in television. The action was unparalleled 
. . . the industry was amazed. 

On April 15, 1948 WTVR, the south's first 
television station, began commercial operation. 
Today Richmond has network TV programing. 

Late in 1947 WCOD, Richmond's first FM station, 
was on the air. 

They join company with WMBG, in service since 1926. 

This is the pioneering record of these Firtt Stations of Virginia. 




WMBG ^ 

WTVR™ 
WCOD- 



/J//.)/ C//r///r^.) <f 4*r'jy///rW 



Havens and Martin Stations, Richmond 

John Blair & Company, National Representatives 






vtf 



TS.. .SPONSOR REPORTS. . 




..SPONSOR REPORT 



FRANK FOLSOM 
NUMBER TWO RCA 
EXECUTIVE 



"WINNER TAKE ALL' 
ONLY SUSTAINER 
PULSE TV TOP-10 



November 1948 

Frank Folsom is now number 2 man at RCA, parent company of NBC. 

His toughness, straight from shoulder thinking and speaking has made 

him heir apparent at great radio corporation. 

-SR- 

Pulse TV surveys of New York and Philadelphia for September indicate 
only 1 sustaining program hits top 10. CBS's "Winner Take All" 
hits 7th place with 20.7 rating, far higher than most radio programs 
rated on comparative basis in TV homes. First 2 programs on Septem- 
ber 2-city basis are "Toast of the Town" (CBS) with 38.8 and "Texaco 



Star Theater" (NBC) with 57.9. 
vidual city basis (nonnetwork; 



Sports rate 3 and 4, but on indi- 
sports dominate September reports. 

-SR- 



DIFFERENT TYPE 
H00PERATINGS 
TO BE RELEASED 
SEPARATELY 



C. E. Hooper has decided not to mix U. S. Hooperatings with long- 
established Program Popularity Hooperatings. Former will be issued 
twice yearly and will be sold as separate package at percentage of 
regular subscriber's fee for other services. Where valid, projec- 
tions of program popularity Hooperatings to entire U. S. will be 
given subscribers 24 times yearly at no extra cost. 

-SR- 

SEPTEMBER TOPS Indicative of financial health of progressive broadcast stations, 
FOR WGAR AND WNBC WGAR (Cleveland) and WNBC (N. Y.) had biggest month in their his- 
tories in September. It was an 18-year record for WGAR and 26-year 



peak for NBC's key station. 



-SR- 



AD-DOLLAR GETTING Advertising's need to get more for its dollar in 1948-1949 is being 
TIGHTER DAILY stressed by most sponsor representatives appearing at NAB district 

meetings. Typical of ad-managers' remarks are those of Dale C. 

Rogers, of Mid-Continent Petroleum Corporation, who stated in Tulsa, 

"Things are tightening up and the advertising dollar must be 

stretched. " 

-SR- 

FM SERVING Regional networks without benefit of telephone lines are being 
REGIONAL NETWORKS tested throughout nation. In Oklahoma and Southwest, KOCY-FM is 
IN TEST AREAS feeding 8 AM stations and FM statewide network from its 938-foot 
tower in Oklahoma City. In Ohio-Indiana, WCTS (Cincinnati) and 6 
Indiana FM outlets are originating programs and relaying them to 
each other. It's said relays via FM can deliver better signals than 
the best grade A lines now used by regular nets. 



SPONSOR, VoLJ, No. 1 , November 1948. Published monthly by Sponsor Publications Inc. Publication offices: 5800 V. Marvine St.. Philadelphia 'tt. Pa. Adtcrlisina. Editor- 
ial, and Circulation offices, 40 W. 52 St., New York 19. N. Y. Acceptance under the act of June 5, 193't at Philadelphia. Pennsylvania, authorized December 2. f.9-»7 



NOVEMBER 1948 



REPORTS. . .SPONSOR RE PORTS. .. SPONSOR Rl 



CBS LEADS 

IN FIRST FALL 

NIELSEN RATING 



Effect of summer programing on network evening program ratings is 
indicated by Nielsen report (released 18 October) for week of 5-11 
September. Instead of NBC's leading the parade CBS has 10 programs 
in first 20 



'average audience" ratings 



ABC has 7, NBC _3_. NBC 

CBS) ranked 



HEALTH PROGRAM 
TESTED BY 
JOHNSON & JOHNSON 



TV COST-PER- 
THOUSAND IN N. 
ABOUT $15.40 



SELECTIVE RADIO 
INCREASE PACES 
ADDED COSTS AT 
STATIONS 



TV SETS INVADE 
TAXIS, AIRLINES, 
YACHTS 



MORE PROGRAMS 
FOR LOCAL STA- 
TIONS' SPONSORS 



FIRST UNDER-$30 
FM SET ANNOUNCED 



didn't show up in rank order until number 8. "Mr. Keen' 

first and Columbia had programs ranking 3, 4, 5. ABC's programs 

ranked 2, 6, 7. 

-SR- 

First comprehensive attempt to check effect of public service pro- 
graming on business of a semimedical nature is being made in Windy 
City. Starting 18 October Johnson & Johnson is sponsoring 13 weeks 
of "It's Your Life" produced by Chicago Industrial Health Associa- 
tion in cooperation with about 300 health and welfare agencies. 

-SR- 

Peter Langhoff, Young & Rubicam director of research, presented 
figures at 4-A West Coast Convention indicating that in New York, 
cost-per-thousand viewers at present runs around $15.40. He imple- 
mented these figures by contrasting sponsor identification figures 
of TV with radio's. Former were given as 70-80%, radio's contrast- 
ing programs 30-40%. 

-SR- 

Only national selective radio business is reported to have increased 
in 1948 at same ratio as broadcasting stations' increase in cost of 
doing business. National Association of Broadcasters estimate indi- 
cates selective radio will hit $99,000,000 in 1948 against $90,000,- 
000 in 1947. Average over-all increase in broadcast advertising 
(gross time sales) will be 7.4% over last year - from $357,000,000 
to $383,800,000. 

-SR- 

TV receivers are being installed on planes (Capital), in taxicabs 
(independents in Chicago), and on private yachts. According to 
"Yachting", 1 yacht cruising up East Coast from Virginia to Maine was 
virtually never outside of TV's effective service area. 

-SR- 

Adding to supply of top-flight transcribed programs made available 
at local level by Ziv, Cowan, NBC Radio Recording, May fair, TSI . 
Goodman, and MacGregor, Broadcasters Program Service will start 
serving over 200 stations this month with weekly package of programs 
on cooperative syndication plan. Pat O'Brien's "From Inside Holly- 
wood," daily 15-minute program, will be first delivered. 

-SR- 

First under-$30 FM radio receiver publicly announced is Emerson's 
AC-DC FM model No. 602. This is not the AM-FM set which SPONSOR 
indicated several months ago would be available this fall. Latter 
is still in planning stage with production difficulties not over- 
come . 

SPONSOR 



in Central 

and Western 

Oklahoma 



Your best b 



wky * m r 



\w 



AUDIENCE SIZE and composition by 
quarter-hours for all programs heard 
in 41 central and western Oklahoma 
counties were measured early this year 
in a Listener Dairy Study conducted 
by Audience Surveys, Inc. Details of 
this thorough-going stud) of radio 
listening are available from either 
\\ K^ or Katz Agency representatives. 




FAR MORE LISTENERS 



Morning - Afternoon - Night 



• far more listeners PER DOLLAR 



BEST BUY- WKY 



OKLAHOMA CITY 



Owned and Operated by The Oklahoma Publishing Company: Tm Daily Oklahoman Oklahoma Citi I imi - The 1 uimi h-> i oc.kmw 

K \ i i k . » tum Springs KLZ, Di nver, (Affiliated Management) Ki cm sented by Thi Km/ Agency, Inc. 

NOVEMBER 1948 



ft. * »■ 



^ WN9M» X 



SPONSOR REPORTS 

40 WEST 52ND 

ON THE HILL 

MR. SPONSOR. H. M. SWARTWOOD 

NEW AND RENEW 

P.S. 

STATION MANAGERS' LAMENT 

TV COMMERCIALS' LIFE 

THE CUBAN PICTURE 

NEW NAME FOR SPOT 

THREE WAY TIE-UP 

LIVING HABITS INDEX 

THE NORWICH-FAT MAN TALE 

RELIGION AND RADIO 

THE PROSPEROUS FARMER 

SELECTIVE RADIO TRENDS 

MR. SPONSOR ASKS 

TV RESULTS 

SIGNED AND UNSIGNED 

TV TRENDS 

4-NETWORK COMPARAGRAPH 

CONTESTS AND OFFERS 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 

APPLAUSE 




1 

4 
12 
14 

17 
20 
25 
27 
30 
33 
34 
37 
38 
40 
42 
46 
54 
60 
68 
76 
83 
90 
102 
102 



Published monthly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. Executive, 

Editorial, and Advertising Offices: 40 West 52 Street, New 

York 19, N. Y. Telephone: Plaza 3-6216. Chicago Office:, 360 N. 

..n Ave., Telephone Financial lfi56. Publication Offices: 

!(]. Marvine Street, Philadelphia 41, Pa. Subscrip- 

tates 55 a year; Canada $5.50. Single copies 50c. 

in U. S. A. Copyright 1948 SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC 

Publisher: Norman It. Glenn. Secretary- 
ouper Glenn. Editor: Joseph M. Koehler. 
Bannister, i 
Art Din D r: Lestei 

.1. Blumcnthal. Ad\ ei De] irtmenl Harr t 

cago Manager) Jerry GlynnJr.; (Los Angeles) Duncan A. Scott 
co) Duncan A. Scott & Co., 
Mill Manager: Milton Kaye. 

■ Mi. pounds i 

chai ■ Pharmi 



1 West 52nd 



REPRINTS 

* We would like written permission to re- 
print the Bread and Cake story, the Milk 
story, and the "Share the Cost" program 
story. 

Walter A. Scanlon 

Radio, TV & Motion Picture Div. 
Director 

Quality Bakers of America Cooperative 

New York 



We thoroughly enjoyed the article on 
Transit Radio in the September issue of 
sponsor. We thought it covered the 
subject so thoroughly that we want our 
salesmen to carry a copy of it in their 
sales manuals. Please send to my atten- 
tion twelve extra copies of this issue. 

We have not as yet reached the pro- 
motion stage of St. Louis Transit Radio, 
but we would like to consider a brochure 
reprinting all or parts of the above article. 
Will you grant us permission, with proper 
credit? Please advise. 

Foster H. Brown, Jr. 
Sales Promotion Director 
KXOK, St. Louis 

► SPONSOR'S policy Is to permit reprinting of 
its reports in most cases, but without deletions. 



TV RESULTS 

As chairman of the television commit- 
tee of the Association of National Adver- 
tisers, I am writing to ask your permission 
to quote from your TV Results — Capsule 
Case Histories that run frequently, at the 
evening meeting of the ANA on 26 Oc- 
tober which will be devoted entirely to 
television. 

Our general idea would be to have some- 
one like Ben Grauer read these case his- 
tories, giving due credit to sponsor as the 
source. As you know, there will be prob- 
ably 400 of the leading national adver- 
tisers and more than 100 New York 
agency men and publishers' representa- 
tives present. 

C. J. Durban 

Assistant Advertising Director 

I 'mted States Rubber Co., N. Y. 



ON "DOMINATION" 

1 read your Webber Motors article in 

the October issue with more than ordin.ii v 

interest. The thought processes which 

persuaded Mr. Webber to dump his 

Please /ion to page 6) 



More 
Listeners 
per Dollar 

...in Dollar Rich 
Pittsburgh 



WWSW gives you more lis- 
teners dollar for dollar 
than any other station in the 
potent Pittsburgh market. 

The formula — simple ! We 
give Pittsburghers more of 
what they want to hear . . . 
24 hours a day. 

Sports — news — music — 
special events . . . are 
plentifully blended into 
the kind of programming 
that has made WWSW a 
local listening habit 
through sixteen success- 
ful years of broadcasting. 

We'll be glad to do for YOU 
the same skillful sales-getting 
job we've accomplished with 
this formula for a host ofspon- 
sors*-- national and local. 

Get more listeners- 
more sales — per dollar in 
this dollar rich market. 
It PAYS to use . . . 




PITTSBURGH'S 

Major Independent 

WWSW, Inc. 
Sheraton Hotel, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

*Ask For joe 




^?¥& 




During 1947, Mid- Americans spent over 
of the total amount spent for drug 
store items throughout the United States. 
Over 188 million dollars for toothpaste, 
prescriptions, r and other drug lines! 

Drug stores are popular with KCMO's Mid-America 
audience . . . not just in Mid-America's small town and 
suburban cities — but in the area's nine major cities. Of 
all cities in the United States, Kansas City ranks 8th in 
drug store sales (1st in cities under 500,000). 

Mid-America's listener-buyers spend heavily at drug 
store counters. To reach them effectively, center your 
selling on KCMO, Mid-America's most powerful 
station. 



.si* 



50,000 WATTS DAYTIME -Non-Direction 

10,000 WATTS NIGHT-810/cc 

National Representative: JOHN E. PEARSON COMPANY 

1 947 gross drug store receipts in 213 Mid- 
America counties — data from Sales Man- 
agement's 1947 Survey of Buying Power. 




mm 



* r / SJrnH'/'fft/ei'i ( 0(«if/e ^_ 



KCMO's Mid-America 



MID-AMERICA FACTS 

Population: 5,435,091 

Area: 21 3 counties inside measured V2 millivolt area. 
Mail response from 466 counties (shaded on map) 
in 6 states, plus 22 other states not tabulated. 

Population Distribution: Farm, 48%; city, suburban, 
and small towns, 52%. 

Net Average Income: $3334 per family. * 

Net Average Income Per Family in 9 Major Cities: 
$5606.* 

Kansas City: 8th in drug store sales in U. S. (1st in cities 
under 500,000). 

Drug Sales in 9 Major Cities: $92,584,000 

Total Mid-America Drug Sales: $188,284,000 

KCMO 

and KCFM...94.9 Megacycles 
KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI 

Basic ABC for Mid-America 



mfasktoW"*"- 



ONE station • ONE set of call letters 
ONE rate card • ONE spot on the dial 



NOVEMBER 1948 



YOU MIGHT HIT SAFELY 
IH 57 CONSECUTIVE 
GAMES- 




- 
A 



BUT... 

YOU NEED 

WKZO-WJEF 

TO REACH 

FIRST BASE 

IN WESTERN MICHIGAN! 

.\o matter what anybody tells you, you can't knock your 
programs ""over the fence" into Western Michigan, from 
the outside. The "fenee." in \\ estern Miehigan, is actually 
a wall of fading. Both invisible ami invincible, it keeps 
outside stations from being heard with any kind of de- 
pendability. And though opinions differ as to what causes 
this unusual condition, the result is apparent to every- 
body: our people listen to their own regional outlets rather than 
to weak and fading "outside'' stations. 

For proof, lake a quick look at these Hooper Report figures 
(January-February, 1948). They show, for instance, that 
\\ KZO in Kalamazoo has exactly four times as great a 
Morning Share-of- Audienee as the next station (65.6* < vs. 
16.1' , thai W.JKI"' in Grand Rapids has 6.7',' more evening 
listeners than the next station. 

We'd be happy to send you all the facts ... or ask Avcry- 
Rnodel. Inc. 



' nui'i'jt" of the New York 1 arikees did in 1'J'it. 



WJEF 



jfat" in KALAMAZOO fekdlt \h GRAND RAPIDS 



and GREATER WESTERN MICHIGAN 

(CIS) 



AND KENT COUNTY 

(CI I) 



BOTH OWNED AND OPERATED BY 
FETZER BROADCASTING COMPANY 

Avery-Knodel, Inc., Exclusive National Representatives 



40 West 52nd 

continued from page 4 



$42,000 into KOIL were strikingly similar 
to those of the E. Hansen Company when 
they dropped their $25,000 into WPOR. 

Of course, you must realize that Mr. 
Webber's Omaha is about three times as 
large as Portland. A Portland auto- 
motive account spending $14,000 on 
WPOR would be about as big a deal as 
the Webber Motors deal in Omaha. 
Viewed that way, I think the Hansen pur- 
chase from WPOR is an even more strik- 
ing example of the technique of putting 
all your eggs in one basket — but a good 
basket. 

The actual E. Hansen schedule is: 



Western Round-up 
News of the I ' 
High Time 
Lawrence Welk 
Dime Derby 
Band by Demand 
Sports Round-up 
Sports Round-up 
News of the World 
News of the World 



6:30- 6:55 a.m. TTSa 
6:55- 7:00 a.m. MTWTFS 
7:30- 7:45 a.m. MWF 
8:30- 8:45 a.m. MWF 
12:30-12:45 p.m. MTWTF 
6:30- o:45 p.m. MTWTFS 
7:05- 7:15 p.m. MTWTF 
7:00- 7:15 p.m. Sat 
10:55-11:00 p.m. Daily 
11:55-12:00 p.m. Daily 

Murray Carpenter 
President, WPOR 
Portland, Me. 



JARO HESS 

I would like to have the set of five 
pictures by Jaro Hess. 

My subscription to sponsor was re- 
newed on 15 August. Does this entitle 
me to the pictures free of charge? If not, 
kindly send them to me billing me for 
same. 

Robert P. Kelsey 
Second vp 

John Hancock Mutual Life 
Insurance Co., Boston 

How about a set of those Jaro Hess pic- 
tures in view of the fact that we just re- 
cently renewed our subscription to 

SPONSOR? 

If you're going to make it tough and 
say we have to pay for the pictures, send 
them anyhow and bill me $2.50 for the 
set. 

Bill King, Jr. 

Advertising Manager 

International Shilling Company 

Minneapolis 

► Currenl subscribers can receive the Jaro ibss 
pictures at J2.50 per Bet. Nev< subscribers re- 
ceive I be set as a bonus. 



WRONG CITY 

Your story on WSAU in the October 

issue was most welcome. However, we 

would like to call your attention to the 

first paragraph in which you say that 

i Please turn to page 1 1 I 



SPONSOR 



FORTWO PENNIES 




* 



^t pp«» We talk to your customers for pennies— and they 
respond with dollars, for there's real wealth in the four great 
markets of the Northwest covered by the PNB stations". These 
9 stations deliver your sales message to more than 372 million 
people, at a combined cost of $40.37 for a daytime spot! 



PACIFIC NORTHWEST BROADCASTERS 



WASHINGTON seattle-king ellensburg-kxle spokane-kxly 

OREGON PORTLAND-KXL 



MONTANA Z NET 



BUTTE-KXLF HELENA-KXLJ BOZEMAN-KXLQ 
GREAT FALLS-KXLK MISSOULA-KXLL 



THE WALKER CO., 551 5th AVE., NEW YORK • 360 N. MICHIGAN AVE., CHICAGO 
841 National Building, Minneapolis, Minnesota • Little Building, Boston, Massachusetts 
15 West Tenth Street, Kansas City, Missouri • 333 Candler Building, Atlanta, Georgia 

PACIFIC NORTHWEST BROADCASTERS 
6381 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, California • 79 Post Street, San Francisco, California 



NOVEMBER 1948 




^::/: 



{Have these words "costs /ess" vanished front the 
language? Almost .. .yet not entirely.) 

Today virtually the only commodity that still costs less than 
in 1939 is the American consumer himself. 

Todav an advertiser by careful I v choosing his medium can buy 
circulation (that is. customers) for considerably less than he 
could in 1939. Nowhere, for example, has the cost of a customer 
dropped more than in network radio, (see "advertising & selling," ma* 1948) 

And nowhere in network radio does he cost as little as on CBS. 

Today an advertiser's dollar spent on CBS delivers from 8% to 
57% more listeners than on any other network. For the second 
year in a row, CBS sponsored programs have again averaged 
the lowest cost per thousand families in all network radio 
—13% lower than the average for the other three networks. 

Today "costs less" may be two words inaudible in most places 

throughout the land, but they can be heard in Radio, 

and most distinctly on the Columbia Broadcasting System. 



L 




■where 99,000,000 people gather every week! 





POWER 

of YourSPOT ANNOUNCEMENT 

Goes l)P or Oo^ with its 

Amc\at\on- 




~fcr £e &??z<uJde4ea£ tft. 




/*?te>, 



/ 



For availabilities, see your nearest John 
Blair Man — or write, wire or phone Johnny 
Gillin. / 

/ 
/ 



Tor the 1948-1949 season, WOW has the finest line-up of 
programs ever aired on the station — the BEST of NBC — 
the BEST of local programs— the BEST of NEWS. That's 
why WOW will continue to be the station "most people 
listen to most" in this area . . . 

That's why your SPOT ADVERTISING on WOW will 
reach the largest available audiences at all times. 



RADIO STATION 



* 




I 



The chameleon takes its color from its back- 
ground . . . SPOT ADVERTISING gets its 
CIRCULATION from its PROGRAM ASSOCIATION 

TWENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY YEAR 



OMAHA, NEBRASKA 
590 KC • NBC • 5000 WATTS 

Owner and Operator of 

KODY AT NORTH PLATTE 



JOHN J. GILLIN. JR., PUIS. * GIN'L. MGR 
JOHN ILtll A CO.. R IPIISINTATI VIS 



io West .l^iid 

continued from page 6 



Wausau is located 150 miles air line from 

Milwaukee, and that WSAU competed 

with the latter's 50 kw WCCO. 

Also, since the survey was made WSAU 

has switched to NBC. 

W. J. Damm 
General Manager 
WTMJ, Milwaukee 

► WCCO of course is located in'Minneapolls, 
200 air miles from Wausau. 



BREAD & CAKE STORY 

We are very anxious to have a copy of 
the issue of sponsor which contained the 
story on how the baking industry is 
using radio. 

I haven't any idea which particular 
issue this was but it seems to me the story 
ran about six months ago. We'd appreci- 
ate it very much if you would have some- 
body locate this issue and forward it at 
your earliest convenience, and bill us for 
it. 

I got a great kick out of your September 
issue, particularly the article on Advertis- 
ing Managers' Lament and the story of 
"Skippy." 

W. S. Clark 
Commercial Manager 
WJEF, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

► Copy of April 1947 issue with "Continental 
Bread and Cake Story" has been sent Mr. Clark. 



DOWN ON THE FARM 

In the October 1948 issue of sponsor 
I read with interest your article titled 
5:30 a.m. on the Farm which gave a good 
account of the inherent selling possibili- 
ties of the heretofore looked-down-upon 
agriculture and farm programs. 

However, there was a point stressed not 
only in the title but throughout the 
article on which I am forced to disagree 
with you. 

A farm program, if we are to agree 
wholeheartedly with your article, must be 
on the air in the early morning hours in 
order to reach the farmer and sell the 
sponsor's produce or service. May I ask 
you how you would feel if you were a 
farmer in the early morning hours with 
the temperature approaching the below- 
zero mark and you were facing a session 
with the cows and chickens — would that 
be the time to approach you with a selling 
message no matter how fine or sound that 
message might be? This is not entirely a 
surmise as far as WN JR. and myself are 
concerned. Statistics from the Radio 
(Please turn to page 81) 




Estimated Primary Coverage. ..To the .5 Millivolt Contour 

Reach and sell these 120 WHB-dominated counties, 
bulging with the receipts of a $75,000,000-a-year mill- 
ing industry, a $365,000, OOO-a-year livestock industry, 
a $223,000,000-a-year candy industry, and a cash farm 
income exceeding seven billion dollars! WHB gets results 
for less. Send for complete coverage data. 



10,000 WATTS IN KANS4 

DON DAVIS ^ 

KlDu] " £5,0ENr £ 

pr-i JOHN T. SCHILLING _| 





MUTUAL NETWORK • 710 KILOCYCLES • 5,000 WATTS NIGHT 



NOVEMBER 1948 



11 




Radio to "Oomph" Labor Output 

Campaign to stimulate man-hour output is in the works. 
Big problem stems from short labor supply, general availability 
of jobs, and concomitant lack of incentive for workers to in- 
crease individual productiveness. With pressure being put 
on firms to reduce product retail prices, production per man- 
hour must be upped and labor must be persuaded to put that 
extra something into its work. Broadcasting will be called 
upon to sell the idea to the working man. In durable goods, 
man-hour production has dropped from an index of 100 in 
1939 to 90 for 1948. 



Luxury Ad Budgets Will Take to Air 

Advertising for luxury lines is bound to be increased within the 
next few months, in fact several corporate budgets are already 
being revised upwards. New campaigns will be announced 
after election and radio will find itself receiving increases of 
from 10 to 25' ,' in men's clothing, textiles, beauty aids, and 
automotive supplies. Government spending, which will be 
increased next year, does not appear to help non-essentials. 

Inflation Worrying Media 

Problem worrying most advertising media is inflation. Rising 
costs of commodities will not permit increases in advertising 
rates, yet they will force broadcasters and publications to pay 
higher production costs. Most manufacturers while disturbed 
about inflation know that increased costs can be passed on. 
On the other hand, advertising media in a number of cases have 
found an increasing resistance to rate increases and have had 
to adjust rates downward. 

Sectional Income Changes Not Paced by Ad Budgets 

Income shift in the past ten years has been away from New 
I ngland and Middle Atlantic states to Far West, Southeast, 
Southwest, and Northwest. Income in the latter four regions 
increased from 2 l >'.,' of national income to 37%, with the 
lecline in the Fast being from 42', to 15%. The Central 
states during the 10-year period have remained fairly static, 
al orbing about 2'>' , oi the national income. Adjustment of 
advertising appropriations have not beeh in proportion to the 
i hanging income status 



Box-tops to Again Lead Premium Field 

The box-top, a running joke among advertiser gagsters, will be 
back in force as a payment for premiums by the middle of next 
spring. Mail and door-to-dcor couponing is being so overdone 
that the device is losing some of its impact. Broadcast-plugged 
premiums obtainable with box-tops are the next hard-hitting 
advertising device scheduled according to post-office men who 
clear the legality of all mailed premiums. Increase in 3rd class 
mail costs is also a reason for decline in mail couponing. 

1949 Price Slide Will By-pass Farmers 

Agriculture department is certain that prices will slide further 
this year and the first half of next year despite government 
support. Speculators are expected to take a licking but price 
slide-off is not expected to affect farmers themselves other than 
emotionally. By planting season of 1949, it's expected that 
farm price index will start climbing, and planting will reach an 
all-time high. Europe will still need everything the U. S. can 
produce in the form of food. 



Make Them Eat Salads 

Big job of advertising is to educate residents of U. S. to eat 
farm produce in basic state as vegetables rather than as meat. 
U. S. is not a vegetable eating nation which is why farm co-ops 
are talking about a broadcast campaign to change table trends 
. . . and increase farm incomes. 



Cigarette Sales Will Soar 

According to the Bureau of Internal Revenue, cigarette sales 
will hit an all-time high in 1948. Sales are expected to double 
pre-war purchases with broadcast advertising firms dominating 
the industry. 



"Cold" Rubber Starts Ad War 

"Cold" rubber tires are standing up so well that an advertising 
war between old line companies and those who will specialize 
in the new synthetics is expected. Corporations controlling 
huge sources of crude rubber are planning an air campaign to 
impress values of natural latex on auto owners. Campaign 
may be initiated by association of crude rubber men or by 
tire manufacturers. Technique and "front" men are not set 
as On the Hill goes to press. 



No Change Foreseen in FCC Status 

Politicians have given little attention to the Federal Communi- 
cations Commission during the presidential campaigning. Ex- 
pectations are that there will be little change in the composition 
of the Commission after elections due to the fact that the liberal 
block headed by Denny and including Durr is no longer part 
of FCC. Industry will be allowed to run itself as long as it 
doesn't stir up any hornets' nests. 

Power Shortages to Be Explained on Air 

Because of impending power shortages in many regions electric 
utilities are expected to increase their advertising appropria- 
tions in order to explain to consumers why the shortages exist. 
Radio will explain to New England, Cleveland, Chicago and 
Northwest win there just isn't enough power to go around. 



12 



SPONSOR 



It Took CENTURIES to Make This a 
Rich Market for Alert Advertisers 




More Than Half of the Nation's Coal* 
Is Produced in This WWVA Coverage Area 



Nature endowed this four-state area of Western 
Pennsylvania, Eastern Ohio, West Virginia and 
Virginia with untold riches in the coal that 
turns the wheels of industry — that furnishes 
heat, power and light for countless millions. 

Day and night thousands of men are busily 
engaged in mining these Black Diamonds, in 
hauling them by river, rail and highway. The 
weekly earnings in the mining and its depend- 
ent industries are at an all-time high — which 
means plenty of spendable dollars for alert 
advertisers. 



With one station, one cost, one billing — 
with WWVA you can reach this four-state heart 
of the soft coal industry; with WWVA's friendly 
programming you can make sure your adver- 
tising message reaches into the homes and 
hearts of the people who make this mining 
industry great. 

For there are more than eight million people 
in this area, and they spend Four and One- 
Half Billion Dollars Annually in retail sales 
outlets. Ask an EDWARD PETRY Man about 
this great WWVA area. 

* Bituminous, that is! 



ffl 

50,000 WATTS ••CBS* -WHEELING, W. VA. 
NATIONALLY REPRESENTED BY EDWARD PETRY & CO. 




NOVEMBER 1948 



13 



Remember the 
story about . . . 




13 little colonies 




that grew 




into the U.S.A.? 

Sounds like the story of 
WWDC in Washington. It 
started out small . . . and 
then it grew . . . and grew 
into the BIG powerful sales 
station that smart adver- 
tisers use in this rich market. 
Your own sales message 
will go over BIG on either 
WWDC-AM or WWDC-FM. 
Get the full story from your 
Forjoe representative. 



WWDC 

AM-FM— The D. C. Independent 

Represented Nationally by 

FORJOE & COMPANY 




l" 



Mr. Spnsor 



Henry M. Swartwood* 

Director of Advertising 
Kaiser-Fraier Corporation, Willow Run, Michigan 



K-F's Hank Swartwood, a deep-voiced six footer, stepped into his job 
last March and has been hopping around like a cat on a hot brick ever 
since. He received his basic training for the 24-hour K-F working day 
with the Kaiser Company on the West Coast, where he was a consultant 
on advertising and public relations during the fabulous production-record 
days of World War II. Like other key executives who work for K-F, he 
is imbued with a team spirit rivaled only by the sight of Harvard alumni 
whooping it up at the annual Yale game, and thinks less of working long 
hours than most ad men. 

This high executive morale has paid off for K-F. The auto firm has 
come up smiling this year, looking very much like the first real competition 
the established leaders of the auto industry have had in two decades. 
K-F advertising, an operation closely integrated with sales promotion and 
public relations, is not wholly responsible although it had much to do 
with K-F's success. In 1946, K-F's first real year of production, the firm 
lost $19,000,000. In 1947 they turned on the pressure, advertised and 
merchandised their cars aggressively, converted Willow Run from an 
empty barn to a humming industrial plant, flew sheet steel in at night by 
chartered planes to keep the next morning's production lines moving, and 
canceled the loss at year's end with a $19,000,000 gain. Today, moie 
than 250,000 K-F's have been bought by motorists, and radio has been 
given the job of maintaining the sales pace. 

More than half of the $8,000,000 advertising budget Hank Swartwood 
is spending goes for radio. Like Ford's ad manager, Ben Donaldson, 
Swartwood is an ex-radio man and a great booster in his organization for 
broadcast advertising. K-F will sponsor radio and TV election-night 
coverage on ABC, competing with Chevrolet's radio coverage on NBC, 
and Nash's on CBS. The last week in October it began sponsorship of 
Guy Lombardo and The Thin Man on Mutual. This January, K-F will 
start sponsoring Winchell on ABC (WW's contract with K-F is the all- 
time high in talent costs for newscasters) and will supplement network 
coverage with selective radio on 1 10 stations in 60 markets. Swartwood 
is also a great booster for the climate on the West Coast, owns an island 
hide-out in the Pacific Northwest. He sees very little of it these days. 

*Seen on left with associates Hal Bobbin, Public relations director, and Norris Nash, sales 
promotion director. 



14 



SPONSOR 




Stutsman, Barnes, Griggs, Foster, Kidder, Logan and 
LaMowre Counties, South Dakota 




with studios in FARGO and JAMESTOWN 

National representatives — The Geo. P. Hollingbery Co. 






COVERAGE and 

LISTENERS 



Dependable coverage with 50,000 watts . . . 
Faithful listeners because of quality programming 



These two factors have made KVOO Oklahoma's 



Greatest Station. 



Advertisers, since 1925, have learned to accept KVOO 
dominance as an established fact. They regularly 
prove this dominance through rising sales curves of 
KVOO advertised products in this great and growing 
Southwestern market where higher than average 
income means more spendable income! 



EDWARD PETRY & COMPANY INC., NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 

NBC AFFILIATE UNLIMITED TIME 

16 




SPONSOR 



new and renew 



R^ffi 



New National Selective Business 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT 



AGENCY 



STATIONS 



CAMPAIGN, start, duration 



Dad's Root Beer Co 
Lektrollte Corp 
Liggett & Myers 
Mason & Mason, hit 

Musterole Co 

Sealy, Inc 

Standard Paint & Varnish Co 

Sterling Drug. Inc 

(Centaur-Caldwell Div.) 
Taylor-Reed Corp 

Wine Grower's Guild 

*Slation list set at present, althTtg 
(Fifty-two weeks generally means a 



Malcolm -Howard 

Bermingham, Castle- 
man & Pierce 

Newell- Emmet t 

Rogers &$Smlth 



I rw in. Wasey 
Robert W. Orr 
Mi ( .uirc 
Young &"Rubicam 



Beverages 
Cigarette lighters 
Fatima Cigarettes 
Root Beer 

Musterole 

Mattresses 

Paints 

Fletcher's Castorla 



0-T Pie Crust Mix, Tracy. Kent and 

Coco-Marsh St. George & Keycs 

Guild Wine Honig-Coopcr 



65 
(Expanding natl campaign) 

Indef 

(Pre-Christmas campaign) 

10-1- 

(Limited natl campaign) 

3* 

(Testing in Midwest; will go 

natl 194")) 

65* 

(Two-part natl campaign) 

Indef 

<Vitl campaign, major mkts) 

10-15* 

(Canadian campaign) 

5-10* 

(Sect! campaign In South; 

5* 

(ABC O&O stas only) 

25-30* 

(Expanding natl campaign) 



E.t. annemts; Oct-Nov; 13 wks 
II. t. annemts; Nov-Dec; 6-13 wks 
E.t. annemts; Oct-Nov; 13 wks 
Annemts. breaks; Oct 15; 13 wks 

E.t. annemts; Oct IS- Nov I; 26 wks 
E.t. annemts; Nov-Dec; 13 wks 
E.t. annemts; Oct-Nov; 1 3 wks 
E.t. annemts; Oct 30; 13 wks 

ABC co-op shows, annemts. 

breaks, partlc; Oct 10: 13 wks 
E.t. annemts, breaks; Oct-Novj 

13 wks 



h mire mav b". aided later. 

13-week contract with options for 3 successive 1 3-week renewals. It's subject to cancellation at the end of any 13-week period) 



New On Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



General Motors (Chevrolet Campbell-Ewald 

Motors div) & Chevrolet Dealers 
George A. Hormel Co BBD&O 

Kaiser- Frazer Corp 
Lewis Food Co 
Mennen Co 
Nash-Kelvinator Corp 
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co 
R. B. Sender Co 

Ronson Art Metal Works 
Sealy Mattress Co 
Vick Chemical Co 



NBC 

MBS 



163 
115 



Morris F. Swancv 


A EC 


270 


Lennen & Mitchell 


CBS 


1 1 Pac 


Duane Jones 


NBC 


9 Pac 


Geyer, Newall & Ganger 


CBS 


165 


William Estv 


MBS 


441 


Irwin, Wasey 


MBS 


41 


Cecil & Presbrey 


MBS 


469 


Alvin Wilder 


CBS 


8 Pac 


Morse International 


CBS 


13 Pac 



Election Night Coverage; Tu Nov 2, 8-11:30 pm 

Hormel Girls Corps; Sat 12-12:30 pm; Oct 2; 9 wks (ex- 
tended contract) 
Election Night Coverage; Tu Nov 2. 7:00 pm-end 
Free for All; Wed 7-7:30 pm; Sep 8; 52 wks 
Sam Hayes-Night Final; MWF 10-10:15 pm; Sep 27; 52 wks 
Election Night Coverage; Tu Nov 2, 8-11 pm 
Cotton Bowl Game; Sat Jan 1 
Gabriel Heatter; Sat 9-9:15 pm; Oct 16; 52 wks 
Twenty Questions; Sat 8-8:30 pm; (increased network) 
Charles Collingwood; Sat 5:30-5:45 pm; Aug 14; 52 wks 
Meet the Missus; MWF 12:30-12:45 pm; Sep 27; 26 wks 



(Fiflv-tir i u> ■ 'ks tjener My tns ans " 13-week contract with options for 3 successive 13 uvek renewals. It's subject to cancellation at tlie end of any 13-week period 



Renewals on Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Campana Sales Co 
Champion Spark Plug Co 
Chesebrough Mfg Co 
General Electric Co 
Gillette Safety Razor Co 

(Toni Co div) 
Hudson Coal Co 
Peter Paul Co 
S. O. S. Co 

Southern Cotton Oil Co 
Western Auto Supply Co 
Whitehall Pharmaeal Co 



Clements 




NBC 


19 


McManus, John iv. Adams 


use 


226 


Met :ann-Erlckson 




CBS 


1ST 


BBD&O 




NBC 


162 


Foote, Cone & Belding 




sue 


157 


Clements 




NBC 


13 


Brisacher, Van Norden 




ens 


1 2 Pae 


McCann-Erickson 




CBS 


8 Pae 
13 Pac 


Fitzgerald 




NBC 


7 Pac 


Bruce B. Brewer 




NBC 


57 


Dancer- Fitzgerald-Sam 


pie 


CHS 


UN 



Soil tair Time; Sun 11:45-12 n; Oct 31; 52 wks 

Champion Roll Call; Fri 9:55-10 pm; Oct 1; 52 wks 

Dr. Christian; Wed 8:30-9 pm; Oct 20; 52 wks 

Fred Waring; Th 10:30-11 pm; Oct ' : 52 wks 

This Is Nora Drake; MTWTF 11-11:15 am; Oct 25; 52 wks 

D&H Miners; Sun 9:45-10 am; Oct 10; 52 wks 

Bob Carrcd: MWF 5:45-5:55 pm; Sep 27; 52 wks 

Knox Manning; MTWTF 1-1:15 pm; Aug 311; 52 wks 

Mr. Information; MTWTF 2:25-2:30 pm; Aug 10; 52 wks 

Noah Webster Says; Th 9:30-10 pm; Oct 14; 52 wks 

Circle \rr<>w show; Sun 10:30-11 am; Oct 3; 52 wks 

Mr. keen; Th 8:30-9 pm; Oct 21; 52 wks 



■:^T r: T~"' r '"'W'^'"'" r ■■"." ':' ":•: "?":"•*■ ■"" ■ ' 




m 



New and Renewed on Television (Network and Selective) 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET OR STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



American Tobacco ( !o 

VniHTi. Inc ( plastics) 
\ S. Beck shoe Co 

Borden < lo (cheese) 



Botanj Worsted Mills 
Bulova Watch Co 
California Fruit Products 

Ltd 
CitJ < luh Cigar Co 
Curt is Publishing Co 



N. W. Vyer 

Bliss cV Marcus 
Dorland 

Young & Rubicam 



Silbersteln-Gold8mil h 

Blow 

Cierth Pacific 

Kronstadl 
BBD&O 



A. C. Gilbert Co (toy trains) 
Gruen Watch Co 
Howard Johnson, Inc 
Kaiser- Frazer Corp 

Krueger Brewing Co 

l'hili|> Morris & Co 
Nash Motors 

Packard Bell Co (radios) 
Phllco ( lorp 



Hoyi 

Grej 

Chambers & \\ (swell 

William II. Weintraub 

Benton & Bowles 

Blow 

Geyer, Newell & Ganger 

Vbbotl Kimball 

I In 1 1 hins 



Plels Brothers Brewery 
Pioneer Scientific Corp 
R. J. Reynolds Co 

Konson Art Metal Works 

Saks Fifth Ave (l)etr.) 

I & M. s, haefer Co (beer) 

si mmona Co 
Time, Inc 

l tans Mirra Products Corp 

John I'. Trommer, Inc 

I nique Art Mfg < lo 
Stephen F. Whitman & Son 
Inc 



William I sty 
( layton 

W :ll;am 1st. 

Cecil & Presbrey 

Simons- Mil- he I son 
BBD&O 



W W.1- I \ heir. 
\\(,\- I \ Chi. 
WCBS-TV, N. V. 
W P1X, V V 

WCBS-TV, V Y. 

WAUI). N. Y. 

Wl'l\ \ <l 

WGN-TV, Chi. 
WPIV N 1 

W w.l- 1 v. Detr. 

WTTG, Wash 
WPIX, V V. 

WC.BS- I \ 

w I II - I \ . Phlla. 

CBS-TV net 
WCHS- I \ . \ 1 
WBZ-TV, Host. 

ABC- I \ net (East 

and Mid-west) 
WPIX, V Y 

\\(,N- l \ . Chi. 
WPIX, N. Y. 
CBS-TV net 

KI'l-TV. L. A. 

NBC- I"\ a Hi I stas 
W VI \ . Newark 
KTSL, I.. A. 
WBKB, Chi. 
WPIX, N. 1 
WGN-TV, Chi 
( BS-TV net 

WWJ-TV, Detr. 
WW.I-1 V, Detr. 
WPIX, N. Y. 



You ng & 

Noil nfj & 


Rubicam 
Rubicam 


WPIV N. Y. 
NBC-TV net 


Colli i 






WPIX, N. Y. 


Federal 






NBC-TV net 


(.rant 
Ward Wh 


ee 


ock 


WGN-TV, Chi. 
w ill - l \ Phlla 



I ilin amii mis; Sep -'*; 13 wks (r) 

< lollege fool hall u.inii s; Sat all as ached; Sep 25; season (n) 

I ilm . Minimis; Oil (,; III « ks (n) 

Gloria Swanson Show (15-mln "Glamor on a Budget" portion); 

I li B-8:15 pm; Sep 16; 13 wks (r) 
Film annemts; Oct ,i; 13 wks in) 

Weal her annemts; Sep 25; 9 wks (n) 

lime aiiiu nils; Oct II; 52 wks (r) 

Film anm nils < test campaign); Oct 18; 13 wks (n) 

Film annemts; Sep 2d; 2d wks (n) 

I ilm aiiin nils; Oct 1 (thereafter monthly for i u o dais before 

puhl of "Ladies Home Journal"; indef (n) 
Film annemts; Oct 4; indef (n) 
Film annemts; Oct 4; indef (n) 
Roar of the Rails; 7-7:15 pm; Oct 2d ; 13 wks in) 
\iiinniis in "Film Theater"; ThF as sched; Ocl 28; 9 wks (n) 
5-mln lilms; as sched; Sep 27; 26 »ks 
Presidential election returns; Tu Nov 2. 8:30 pm to close; I 

time (n) 
Boxing bouts from Rldgewood Grove; Sat 9:06 to close; Ocl -'; 

13 wks (n) 
Film annemts; Sep 27; 52 wks (n) 
Film annemts; Oct ■<; 52 wks (n) 
Presidential election returns; Tu No\ 2, 8 pm (until election is 

decided); 1 time (n) 
Television Talent Hunt; Sat 6:15-6:45 pm; Oct 30; 13 wks (n) 

(simultaneous with AM on Ml) 
Touchdown; 20-min film as sched; Oct I; thru season (n) 



Weather annemts; Sep 22; 13 wks (r) 

Film annemts; Sep 25; 13 wks 

Madison Square Garden Events; as sched <4(l events); Sep ill 
thru Mar 2d. I'M*) (n) 

Film annemts; Sep 15; 2d wks (n) 

Film annemts before I . of Michigan games; Oct 2; 5 wks (n) 

Madison Square Garden hockej games; as sched; Oct 27; sea- 
son (n) 

Film annemts; Oct I; 13 wks (n) 

Presidential election returns; Tu Nov 2. K pm (until election 
decided); 1 time (n) 

Annemts in "Record Rendezvous"; Ml h hetw 7:05-7:30 pm; 
Sep 22; 13 wks (n) 

Wrestling Bouts from St. Nicholas Arena; Tu 9:50 to close; 
Oct 12; 13 wks (n) 

Film annemts; Oct 5; 13 wks (n) 

Film annemts; Sep 26; 13 wks (n) 



Sponsor Personnel Changes 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



.lames V. Barton 

Reilly Bird 

li. B. Freltag 

V. H. Garabedian 

Janet Gordon 

Helen McKay Horchler 

Joseph ( ,. How land 

W illiam F. Hufsiader 

W illiam M. lit mann 

Irving A. Kalhman 
l i i in is u Johlie 

Fred Klein 
I. eon Mcsnlk 

I \l N,,i i. ,n 

W. M Reynolds 
John V. Sandberg 

I) I Shea 

Phvllls Webb Soehl 

II. C. Solarl 

I lonovan li Shi ler 
W \i. hie Suftft 

Otis L. Wallet 

Will Whitmore 



Hudson Motor Car Co, Detroit, asst adv dir 

Western Union Telegraph Co, N. Y.. asst adv mftr 
Worth Co. Hartford Conn., adv mftr 
Buchanan, N. Y. 
1'iessed Steel Car Co Inc (Domestic Appliance 

dlv). Chi. 
Genera] Motors Corp (Buiek dlv), Detroit, gen 

sis mftr 
Procter iN Gamble Co, (ami., media operations 

head 

l versharp Inc, N . Y. 

Dancer- Fitzgerald-Sample, Chi. 

Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, Chi., acct exe< 

I M \d\ei I isinu. N V*., pres 

California & Hawaiian Sugar Refining Co I td, 

S I sis rep 

Western Electric Co Inc, N. v.. publication nnir 

Kraft Foods Co, Chi., asst adv dir 

Armour >N Co (soap dlv), < Jii.. sis piom mftr 



Standard Brands Inc. N. Y„ adv dir 

General Foods Corp (Post Cereals dlv), Battle 

< Ireek Mich.. ad\ mui 
General Motors Corp (Buiek dlv), Detroit assi 

gen sis mftr 

Western I Icitlli Co Inc. N. Y., ad\ mftr 



Lustron Corp, Columbus Ohio, adv mftr 

.1 . L. Hudson Co, Detroit, adv mftr 

Armour & Co (toiletries dlv), < )hl.. sis mftr 

Same, adv mftr 

lane Bryant, N. Y.. adv mftr 

I Miller & Sons Inc. N. V. adv mftr 

Motorola Inc. Chi., adv. sis prom mftr 

Same, vp 

Same, media dir 

Same, vp in chge sis 

Gillette Safety Razor Co (Tonl Co dlv), Chi., prizes, prom 

dir, radio depl 
Gillette Safety Razor Co (Tonl Inc di>). (hi assi radio dir 
\ ini Stores, N. Y . adi mftr 
Same, adv, nidsft mftr 

Same, adv mftr 

Same, adv-sls prom mftr 

Same, sis mftr 

Joske's of Texas, San Antonio, radio adv dir 

National Distillers Products Corp (Italian Swiss Colon] 

Wine dlv), S. F., sis mftr 
Same, vp in chge adv 
Same, gen sis mftr 

Same, gen sis mftr 

American Telephone & Telegraph Co, N, V. radio adv mftr 



Advertising Agency Personnel Changes 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



I Raymond Bell 
Gloria Brand) 
li.ll Bj l< 

Frank R. ' lapka 
.1 l.dwin ( Ihapman 



1 1, .ii. ihue .s, t loe, N. Y. 

W W lit Wash 

Spitzci >N Mills. Toronto, radio dir 
i apka .s. Kennedy, H'wood., partner 
i o i. Ludgln, ' hi. . accl exec 



Same. W ash . mftr 

\i\ in Epstein, Wash radio, J \ dir 
^ounft iN Rubicam, Toronto, radio sop. 

I W K.llllsel I I'll ooil \ |. 
Same, vp 



(Please turn to page 68) 



IN IOWA THEY TURN ON THE 
IGNITION -THEN THE RADIO/ 




K* 






. 


i 




|l 


? 

1 








1 




X he 1915$ Iowa Radio Audience Survey* 
shows that //' , of Iowa car owners have 
radios in their cars that these extra 
("non-Hooper""!) radio listeners pro- 
vide a very substantial harms audience! 

On long trips. 60.1% of car radios were 
reported to he in use "almost all the 
time" or "quite a hit of the time." On 
short trips, the remarkably high per- 
centage of .'{(>.()' , arc heard "almost all 
the lime*" or "quite a hit of the time.*" 

I p-to-date, factual information on use 
of ear radios is only one of mam new 
and extremelj interesting subjects cov- 
ered in the 19111 Iowa Radio Audience 
Survey. Thej confirm the Survey's II- 
year policy of modernizing your old 
data "bringing to light new information not 
previously gathered." 
NOVEMBER 1948 



For all the information you need about 
radio in Iowa, write us for your copy of 
the 19 115 Iowa Radio Audience Survej 
today —or ask Free & Peters. 

The 1948 [owa Radio Audience Survey is a "must" 
for every advertising, sales* or marketing man who is 
interested in the [owa sales-potential. 

The 1948 I .hi i«. M is I he eleventh annua] stml> of radio 
listening habits in [owa. It was conducted h> Dr. K. I.. 
Whan of Wichita University and his stall", is l>ase«l on 
personal interviews of 9.224 Iowa families, scientifically 
selected from the city, town, village and farm audience. 
\s a service to the sales, advertising, ami research pro- 
fessions, W MO will gladly Bend a cops °f the l'M8 Survey 
t<> anyone interested iti the subjects covered. 

WIHI® 

+ /©r Iowa PLUS + 

Des Moines . . . 50,000 Watts 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 

P. A. Loyet, Residenl Manager 

FREE X PETERS, INC. National Representatives 



19 




New de\ elopmenls on M*0\>OK stories 



If you re looking 

r I' i //% 

ror a natural — 



W I ( \ has moved i<> lill a grow- 
ing demand l>\ inaugurating a 
M . .n.l.i \ -iliru-l Vida\ half-hour 

MYSTfcm series al 2 o'clock. 
[Vote dial time! . . . it's the 
gimmick! There jusl isn't an) 
complete-episode competition . . . 
for each i> a complete and differenl 
mysterj of lop calibre: "Mysterj 

I- \1\ Hobby, I'Ik" Avenger," 

" Adventures of Bulldog I >rum- 
inonrl. " "Strange W ills," and 
"Mysterj House. 

I?u\ it once or five times a week 
or in am combination . . . and 
you'll talk to a big segmenl of 
Rhode Island and adjacenl Massa- 
chusetts. We're turning on the 
advertising heal with car-cards. 
spots and newspapers. This show 
i> going places, iou're invited i<> 
come along now while there's 

room. 



IT'S A BUY 



ON 




5000 WATTS 
DAY & NIGHT 



WALLACE A WALKER, Gen. Mgr. 

PROVIDENCE, The SheroronBiltmore 

PAWTUCKET, 450 Main St. 



Representatives: 

AVERY-KNODEL, INC. 



ps 



(See "After-Midnight Audience," SPONSOR, May 1947, 
page 1 3.) What new developments have there been in 
after-midnight programing? What new audiences are being 
reached? 



Of the nation's 30,750,568 passenger cars*, at least 75 f 'v are equipped with 
radios. Several million express trucks are similarly equipped. Until re- 
cently, the drivers of these vehicles, toutists and truckers, were ignored as 
a factor in after-midnight programing. Radio listening on the nation's 
highways is at its peak at night. Most drivers on lonely stretches of 
road, if they have a radio, turn it on to keep themselves amused and, 
more important, awake. Once out of range of the few big-city stations 
that continue their radio selling activities during the wee small hours, 
they have had very little to listen to. 

Out on the West Coast, one radio chain is now programing to the 
nighttime motorist. The recently-formed Pioneer Broadcasting System 
has organized a network of 1 1 stations in Arizona and Southern California 
to air programs to motorists between midnight and 6 a.m. Pioneer's 
president, Bob Morris, expects to sell time to hotels and beaneries along 
the well-traveled routes leading into the two Western states, where in 
July of this year seme 86,000 tourists spent nearly $12,500,000. 

To insure the fact that motorists will listen to Pioneer's 11 -station 
web, Morris researched the subject of what stay-up-late motorists usually 
dial . . . when there's something to dial. Morris' discoveries formed the 
basis for Pioneer's program structure, which consists of network-fed 
recorded music (from a studio in Hollywood) plus five minutes every hour 
of locally-handled news, weather, road, and traffic information. Special 
bulletins about road blocks, fog, frost, etc., for motorists' benefit, will be 
tossed in when needed. 

If the vertical programing of the Pioneer operation makes money and 
shows definite sales results for its advertisers, Pioneer Piesident Morris 
expects to increase the size of the network, moving up the California 
coast first, then eastward. Morris is confident that it will work, and is 
fitm in his belief that the full potential of Ameiica's after-midnight radio 
audience has only been scratched. 



*Source: Automobile Manufacturers' issocialion 



l»S 



(See "Petrillo Plans Ban Lifting," SPONSOR, October 
1948, page 112.) Will transcriptions of commercial pro- 
grams be permitted shortly? When will the recording ban 
be lifted? 



Although the consumer press has made it seem that resumption of record- 
ing is a long way off, the facts are, as indicated in sponsor s report of last 
month, that there is very little separating the American Federation of 
Musicians and the broadcast recording industries. James C. Petrillo's 
bid for royalties covering the period in which the recording ban lias been 
in effect is more to create a bargaining position rather than to actually 
obtain the cash position which the acceptance of such ;> claim would place 
him. Resumption oi recording, both for consumer disks and broadcast 
it's, will be effectuated before the first of the year. Membership pressure 
on the AFM president will not te severe enough to force him to accept 
less than he has decided, in advance, until 1949. 

Transcribed musi< in one broadcast per aria and ot station e.t.'s will 
be permitted even before the first of the year. Librarj transcriptions are 
..in factor that remain in the "maybe" class. Petrillo. who has been 
lighting the use of consumer disks for broadcasting is in an untenable 
po ition should he permit library recordings foi stations without some 
sp< cial ( onsideration. 

Please nun to page 22) 



20 



SPONSOR 



it's easy. 



IF YOU 
KNOW HOW! 



I 



F we should try to operate a station in, say, New England — 
we'd make a terrific flop. We don't "\noiv" New England. 

But for 23 years we native Southerners at KWKH have worked 
hard to know everything about our listeners' preferences, in 
this urea. We've built a near-perfect KNOW-HOW in this 
area. The result is that KWKH is TOPS in this area. 

Of all CBS stations covered by the Hooper Station Listening 
Indexes in the U. S., for example, KWKH rates 10th in the 
morning, 9th in the evening. May we send you the rest of 
the evidence? 




50,000 Watts 



NOVEMBER 1948 



CBS 



KWKH 





Texas 


SHREVEPORT < 


LOUISIANA 


The Branham Company 
Representatives 


Arkansas 
Mississippi 



Henry Clay. General Manager 



21 




• CAROLINA REVEILLE 

• MUSIC FOR THE MRS. 

• PIEDMONT FARM PROGRAM 



Plus NBC'S 

PARADE OF STAR 
NETWORK SHOWS 



ALL ON WSJS am-fm 

THE STATIONS WHICH 

SATURATE 
NORTH CAROLINA'S 
GOLDEN TRIANGLE 



WINSTON- 
SALEM 



GREENSBORO 




HIGH POINT 



No. 1 MARKET 

IN THE 

SOUTH'S No. 1 STATE 



(^ WINSTON-SALEM (fy 

THE JOURNAL-SENTINEL STATIONS 




|)*S« [Continued from page 20) 

It's safe to plan transcribed musical programs after the first of the 
year. No matter how much conversation is made on the subject, the ban 
will be over by that time. 



I» 



S(See "Cut-Ins Produce Sales . . . and Problems Too, 
# SPONSOR, March 1947. page 34.) Are any ne< 
national network advertisers selling via cut-ins? 



The Kaiser-Frazer Corporation, now one of radio's big-time advertisers, 
is the latest advertiser to tie in its local dealers through "local identifica- 
tions" or cut-ins. K-F dealers will plug the new 1949 line in cut-ins heard 
on The Adventures of the Thin Man, one of two (the other: Guy Lombardo) 
airshows recently placed by K-F on Mutual. 

Like other Mutual advertisers who are using cut-ins on their shows 
(Teen-timers, Inc. with Teentimers Club and Trimount Clothes with 
Sherlock Holmes, etc.), K-F feels that the cut-in commercial, in which the 
name of the local dealer receives a plug in the market he is serving will, do 
much to increase dealer cooperation and support to K-F's national 
advertising. 

K-F expects to control the use of these cut-ins carefully, since the 
dealer outlets are closely connected with K-F. They do not want to run 
the risk of having air copy inserted into their shows which is not in keeping 
with the general tone of the network commercials. K-F and its agency, 
William H. Weintraub, are fully aware of the negative results that can 
come from poorly-handled cut-ins. 

The cut-in commercial can increase the flexibility of network radio, 
K-F feels, but it works only when it is closely supervised. 



If your SALES MESSAGES are on 




CHATTANOOGA 



You are enjoying the PLUS of 

UIAPO fm 



Affiliated with 
NBC 



National Representatives 
HEADLEY-REED CO. 



22 



SPONSOR 




re von one of the folks who've been buying 
Pacific Coast Network coverage on the basis of a plus mar 
ket that — in reality— doesn't exist at all? Isn't it a little like 
paving for the hole in the doughnut ... and isn't it time 
you asked yourself how much that hole is costing you? 



highly 




f 

^_-/4all in an ABC representative who has the WHO! i: 
storj on Pacific Coast network coverage ... because we 

think it's a darned shame for anvone to pav extra lor tin 
hole in the doughnut. ^ ou'll 
truths on the complete picture. 



earn some astonishing 



roadcast Measurement Bureau studies — on 
impartial basis — prove that each of the four net- 
works on the Pacific Coast has at least 90% coverage of 
the entire market (ABC has 95%) . . . whether it's little 
Lemoncove in the Sequoias' shadow, or big Long Beach. 

On the coast you cant get away from 

ABC 

FULL COVER AC K ... In counties where BMB penetration is 
il '".. en better; and by virtue of impi<>\ • - ■ I laci lilies. 'M.7"o ol w.i. 
Pacific Coa-t radio families (94% of its retail sales) are reached 
by ABC. 

[NCRE VSING AUDIENCE... Every month ABC Pacific isa 
better buj than the month before. Average evening Hoopers are 
now .'!7"o over 191."): and morning A lit '. Pari In- has been the lop 
Hooper coast network for 10 out of the last 12 months. 

PROMOTION. ..No other network consistent) backs it- pro- 
grams with the intense promotion showmanship that makes 
\l!<- programs talked about and listened to. Good ratings 

depend on good show-, but VBC does give YOU the coverage and 
the promotion that helps boost Hoopers. 

AVAILABILITIES... \I!C still offers extremelj worthwhile 

Pacific Coast availabilities including: 9:00-9:30 p.m. Sunday, 
6:30-7:00 p.m. Thursday. 7:00-7:30 p.m. Saturday. 

1.1 )\\ ER COST. . . \ISC brings you all this at a COSt pel thou- 
sand radio families as low or tower than an\ other Pacifii net- 
work. No wonder we -a\ whether you're on a Coast network 

or intend to be, talk to ABC. 

ABC PACIFIC NETWORK 

NEW YORK: 30 Rockefeller Plaza • Che),. 7-3700 
DETROIT: 1700 Stroh Building 26 • CHerrj 
CHIC \<.(> : Merchandise Mart Building • DElaware 1900 
LOS Wt.l I ,ES: 6363Sunsel Boulevard ■ III dson 2-3141 
SAN I H \NCISCO: l.V, Montgomen Street ■ EXbrook 2 



NOVEMBER 1948 



23 




There's a lot more to it than this.. 



« 



Weed 

and company 



In fact, there's a complete story behind this picture. The man is a 
Weed & Company representative. He's almost always welcome 
wherever he goes . . . Why? There's a lot to it that doesn't show 
in a receptionist's friendly smile. 

There's training and timing, associations and experience . . . 
There's a lot of knowledge backed up by a lot more hard work. 
Basically . . . there's the fact that he never wastes time. 
He means business ... he talks business. 

He knows specific markets like the back of his hand 
and he talks effective coverage in them. He knows 
how to get maximum results from every penny you spend 
for advertising ... he talks Spot Radio. 

Spot Radio is a highly complicated as well as a highly profitable 
medium. The expert knowledge required to use it correctly makes 
Weed and Company service indispensable to any radio advertiser. 



radio station representatives 



new york • boston • Chicago 
sanfrancisco *' atlanta •■ 



24 



• d e t r o i t 
ho 1 1 y wood 

SPONSOR 








lament 




To© few advertisers 



know I lie stations they buy 



• Too few timebuyers, account executives, and adver- 
tising managers know the stations they buy. That 
more than any other lament is a major gripe of 
station managements. Station managers not only complain 
that network sponsors have very little idea of the stations that 
make up their networks, but they also complain that buyers of 
announcements and selecting programs fail to get even a sketchy 
idea of the individual stations on which they buy time. Each 
station differs in some manner from most other stations. One 
management is very promotion-minded, another is program- 
minded, and still a third is merchandising-minded. 

Seldom does a station place promotion, merchandising, and 
programing on an equal basis. Frequently local conditions 
force broadcasteis to stress one factor above another. If a 
station is allied with or owned by a newspaper, publicity, which 
is considered part of promotion, comes to the station naturally 
through intra-organizational deals. This enables the station 
management to go further into merchandising and sometimes 
local programing. In other cases where local newspapers are 
anti-radio, management is forced to promote all the time, to 
fight the local papers rather than to expect them to cooperate 
in publicity and promotion. 

Station management is human. Thus when one executive 
has come up through program operations, he's frequently show 
conscious. Another manager has come up through engineering 
and he's generally found checking the quality of the signal 
strength of the station. When a sales executive of a station 

Excerpts from typical letters of station managers indicate that gripes k 
differ very little .from station to station but that they are real aches r 



' • ■ 

- 

• _ 

■ 



v'-> 
■ 



■ 







„ 1° C 



or &iS L, bo* 6t * . V oc^ ° r ,„ to 






tt.e xr ' 



o* 



» »£V ( 






„ to t^* . lS *" etl 









or 
c- S 



ale 3 



tefi 



,,<• »er 



\a 



^eVtv£ 



lit 



^\ed- 



&C« 



U0±i> 1 



B ee tb*°* 

A ,er^ 5er %e«^ v -' ;, 



::.t 



ve* 



de 



Ug^ 



t&e 






of • 
etc 






rei. 



.!• 



Colli 1 



&te- 



1* 







s otae s " 



tttf>6 






to 















•itf> 



. ,-■..•-• ^ 



f*« r 



i ■ ft 



tjUfW 



^^r^r* w* 






b\i« 












r^\Xo* s * u\ til - 1 - ~ r»» w ,. t 



;nr 



»dJ-0 



s U l 





















it>ie* 






one 



tV>e 



IS* oI 

,noy 









IS 






\% a 33 -*. 
v * con*? 5 - ,.rri-P tv 



)V offl< 
i.t*ei 



-; , more 
re »^ S0 ac.^ c /^e ^° r 



i*-^^, r^ io 














Problems with (sponsors 

1. Ft-\> advertisers understand the broadcast medium 

_. \11 sponsors want continuous promotion for their 
programs 

■'>. Although all broadcasting i- local. few advertisers in- 
clude indoctrination of stations in their pre-broadcasl 
plans 

1. Sponsors fail to realize that station- do not. a- network- 
do. permit summer hiatuses in schedules 

">. I (mi man) advertisers demand their agencies buj time 
bj power of stations 

6. Sponsors feel that network broadcasting i> always the 

ultimate in radio 

7. loo man; advertisers place their schedules and then 
expecl miracles to happen all by them-elve- 



Problems with agencies 



1. Timebuying i- mostlj based on old hook larnin' 

2. Agencies ar< besel with Hooperating-itis 

3. The Madison Avenue V ^. and North Michigan 
Vvenue ( bicago ivorj towers don't permit nationwide 

obsen ation 

I. Over 60 °/i of timebuyers are clerks 

5. Account executives ha\e little contact with advertising 

in operation 

6. Local stations vs i t h intense coverage are ignored for big 
outlet- that cover greal expanses lightly 

7. Mosl agencies are neither equipped, nor desirous of 
following through, once a campaign i- placed with a 

-tat ion 



Problems with broadesist industry 

1 . Broadcast in:: i- constantly selling itself short 

2. Promotion i- too frequently a nece — ar\ evil and not an 
integral part of air showmanship 

... M;ni\ station representatives have loo big a li-t of 
stations 

1. Representatives do little real selling 

5. loo few radio-wise men own stations 

'■. I here"- trio much formula thinking and loo little 
creative programing 

7. There's little relation between number of stations 
serving an area ami the needs of the area 

>\. Radio i- all too prone lo he embarrassed bj commercial 

-IK i . --. - 

'). Public service i- part of a station's business hut there's 
nothing wrong with broadcasting being a business 

10. I n I ra-indu- 1 r\ cooperation onlj appears when the in- 
dustry i- in I rouble 



has become station manager, and there 
are more sales-trained station managers 
than any other kind where they know 
a great deal about the broadcasting 
business), the station is apt to think of 
the sponsor as the court of last appeal. 

Thus each station delivers something 
different from the next station. The jobs 
they do are not based necessarily upon 
their resources, but upon the thinking of 
the station manager and his executive 
staff. It is true that ownership of the 
stations have something to do with the 
service they render but stations under the 
same ownership run the complete gamut 
of sponsor service: from doing practically 
nothing to actually obtaining distribution 
for a new product. It is therefore vital 
that an advertiser realize the service that 
is available from the stations he's using, 
whether they be part of a network or out- 
lets bought for a selective campaign. 

Requests for program promotion by 
practically every sponsor or his agency 
gripe several station managers. Yet 
man)' times a manager finds himself 
having spent thousands ballyhooing a net- 
work commercial only to discover next 
season that the program he pVomoted has 
moved on to another network and is 
actually competing with his station. 
There is only one way to be certain that a 
program won't shift and that is to check 
and see if it's a network-owned package. 
A sponsor who buys a network-owned 
program is in a position to expect better 
than average station promotion of his pro- 
gram since the station managers can be 
certain that they won't be building an 
audience for a program that may move off 
their stations. 

Many stations pride themselves on the 
promotion they do for programs. They go 
to considerable expense to make up pro- 
motional folders which are sent to account 
executives at the agencies. What hap- 
pens, state many station managers, is that 
the reports are routed to the publicity 
men at the agencies and the timebu 
seldom see them. 

"Maybe it's a little thing but I blow 
my top," states one station executive 
"when our presentation of a program pro- 
motion is acknowledged by a form post- 
card initialed by a publicity man's secre- 
tary. Why, after we have been impor- 
tuned by letters, telegrams, and even 
telephone calls, to get out and promote a 
program, someone at the agency doesn't 
think that it's important enough to sit 
down and write us a letter about our 
efforts. I'll never know." 

"Promotion," said another station man- 
ager while he pounded the desk, "costs 

e turn to page 88) 



:< 



SPONSOR 



A 



temco; 

IT. 





Most talked of commercial of the year is Texaco's pitchman on the Star Theater (NBC). Authorities feel he'll v»ear out welcome vvithi- 

Life expectancy of a TV commercial 



some must he 
eh .-iii^ed frequently 
while others live 
on and on 



Repetition has been a r'unda- 
&m mental tool of bra 

vertising almost from the 
beginning. But without careful schedul- 
ing in TV, repetition can lead to a totally 

don Brora 

Ces that the sight - 
plus-sound selling of the visual air is 
remembered longer than radio selling in 
as much as B8 Peases Sonx 
new set owners and more thai- 85 

an set owners sa\ t:\ l'\ 

commercials to those of radio." How i 
the T\' commerdal not suited to repeti- 



tion ean pile up ill ft t ig in n 

waj . the a 
able figu es 

This doesn't mean that the sp - 
using T\' has to fa nmen 

time lu g f - 
- mean is that TV se'. 
come the a ling 

without repetition 

Some phases rv s 
peated indefinitely. T - primarily 



NOVEMBER 1948 






27 




(MAXWELL 
W HOUSE 

3Coff« e 





porfrinnC especially animated, make excellent "billboards" with which to open and close TV pro- 
l/dl lUUIIO, grams. Because viewers are conditioned to picture trademarks, "billboards" live long 




vs 



advocates contend film is safer but live commercials permit of greater flexibility. 
NBC's Bob Smith (left) displays Polaroid but uses film (right) when selling product-use 



the "billboard" type of identification 
which open and close either spot or pro- 
gram. The public has been conditioned 
to accept M-G-M's roaring lion, Para- 
mount's snow-capped peak and ring of 
stars, Warner Brother's shield, Universal- 
International's revolving globe, etc., as 
part of its theater fare. Since these 
"house" ads are a low-pressure form of 
salesmanship, audiences don't complain. 
For the TV sponsor, house ads do as well. 
Here, the billboarding should be confined 
to easily-recognized trademarks, with or 
without a well-known product slogan. 
Sometimes it can include more. 

General Foods (for Maxwell House 
Coffee) uses a typical animated billboard 
on Meet the Press, having used it previ- 
ously also on Try and Do It (both on 
NBC-TV). The opening contains the 
essence of the selling principles used later 
in the program's commercials. In the 
commercial proper, the selling is done 
"live" about three out of four times. 
Here, General Foods and their agency, 
Benton & Bowles, prefer to take no 
chances on viewer fatigue. Even the film 
commercial is freshened up periodically 
by varying the film and the sales spiel, by 
adding a new opening. But the General 
Foods "billboard," like that of Texaco, 
Gulf, Gillette, and many other adver- 
tisers, remains constant. 

The straight live commercial is the 
easiest commercial to repeat without 
running into the law of diminishing re- 
turns. First of all, the live commercial is 
usually integrated into the show so 
thoroughly that it is difficult to tell just 
where it starts and stops. Second, it is 
easy to vary, bec?use a new costume (like 
Ivfcrtha Logan's collection of aprons used 
in Swift & Company TV commercials) or 



elfin nffr can be repeated time and time. Eclipse Sleep Products' TV short, "The Beautiful Dreamer,' 
jlgll U II o uses Powers' model, Rosemary Colligan, to 



sell just before stations say "good-night" 




another product from the sponsor's line 
(like Gulf's on We the People) adds the 
element of freshness necessary. Third, 
since it is not Oil film, thus not '"perma- 
nent" like an e.t. spot, the live commer- 
cial can be done with new copy, new sets, 
new perscnalities, and new products with- 
out deviating very far from the basic com- 
mercial approach. Some live commer- 
cials do tend to fall into definite patterns 
which are hard to vary. A good example 
of this is Texaco 's pitchman, which will be 
hard put to appear fresh once the novelty 
of using a cai nival barker wears off. One 
added factor in using live commercials is 
that they can often be of the low-pressure 
variety. This is usually the how-to-do-it 
type, such as Alma Kitchell's Kclvinator 
Kitchen stint in which all the kitchen 
gadgetry is Kelvinator-produced, but 
used as an unobtrusive backdrop to 
Kitchell's cookery demonstrations. 

Many TV advertisers can't use live 
commercials. For one thing, they are ex- 
pensive. For another, there is always the 
risk in live product demonstrations that 
something will go wrong. In certain 
types of programing — sports, news and 
special events, spot campaigrs, etc. — 
it is impractical to use live talent for 
commercials. 

A good deal depends, in the repetition 
of film commercials, on the content and 
treatment of the commercial. TV film 
commeicials overly heavy on selling, or 
which resort to the irritant technique, 
have a short life in terms of their effective- 
ness on viewers. The "cute" commercial 
(of which more will be said later) is 
another thing which can be extremely 
effective the first few times it is seen and 
then, like a twice-told joke, begin to lose 
(Please turn to page 64) 



"How to" commercials have a low fatigue factor 




A kitchen is always background as Martha Logan, on the Lanny Ross Show, sells Swift products 





Martha Logan changes chore and apron from telecast to telecast, but she's always kitchen selling 




A new apron, a new dish, and Martha Logan is on another telecast for Swift & Co. over NBC-TV 



pari tiro of SI i ()\S()l\'s report on International radio 



The Cuban picture . 



nil«'«l Slatos ;ul\cr(is«'i> 



allocate fabulous sums for Island radio 



over-all. 



Colgate-Palmolivc-Peet (Cru- 
sellas & Cia) spends $1,500,- 
000 of its $2,000,000 Cuban advertising 
budget in radio. The second great soap 
corporation in the Cuban market, Procter 
& Gamble (Sabates, S. A.), spends nearly 
$1,000,000 of a $1,500,000 budget on the 
air. If the U. S. parent companies were 
to spend at the same ratio for broadcast' 
ing in the States, CPP would be spending 
$42,000,000 and P&G $28,000,000. 

These two organizations buy hours at 
a time on both Cuban networks, CMQ 
and RHC* They have adopted the day- 
time soap-opera formula for their Latin 
American audiences. Dramatic strips 
(novelas) swarm all over the network 
schedules. Unlike in the U. S., the emo- 
tional escapades can be heard both day and 
night, with the number one heart tugger, 
The Right to Be Born, achieving the amaz- 
ing audience rating of 41 (in the Cuban 
equivalent of the Hooperatings). Al- 
though CPP and P&G introduced day- 
time serials to the island, The Right to Be 
Born is sponsored by Bestove Products 
for Kresto, a Hemo-type product. 

Cuba is a radio-minded nation. Its 
44,128 square miles is less than that of 
Louisiana (48,523) yet it has 84 AM and 
16 shortwave transmitters while the 
Pelican State has 37 AM stations and no 
shoit wave outlets. Shipments of radio 
receivers from the States to Cuba are 
said to be greater than shipments to all 
the Central American nations combined. 

Cuba's population is over 5,000,000, 
and with slightly more than five persons 
per family this means a little less than 
I. din i.ooo households on the island. 
Although the last report (1940) indicated 
that only oik- out of four families owned 
mik oi more radio receivers, it is esti- 
mated currently that 17' , of all Cuban 
households own sets. While listening in 



the U. S. A. runs from a daytime summer New Jersey runs its business in Cuba, 
low of 1.79 listeners pei listening set to a The Esso firm on the island is Standard 
midwinter high of 3.2 for certain high- Oil of Cuba. Both Crusellas & Cia 
appeal programs, estimated listeners per (Colgate-Palmolive-Peet) and Sabates, 
set in Cuba run from a daytime low of S. A. (Procter & Gamble) manufacture all 
2.1 to a nighttime high of 4.2, figures that their products locally. Both offer all the 
resemble TV viewing indices. There are items (some under different trade names) 
fewer radio homes, percentage-wise, in which the parent companies merchandise 
Cuba but more ears gather around each in the States and a number of local pro- 
receiver. There is a hedge on the listen- ducts besides. The latter are products 
ers-per-listening-set figures. The better- strictly designed to meet competition, 
than-U. S. figures are made possible by such as Palmolive Toothpaste which has a 
the low-mcome-group set owners. The formula conceived to compete with a 
well-to-do do not cluster around a receiver local product. The local tooth paste, 
any more than their counterparts in the Gravi, has developed an amazing follow- 
48 States. in § on the Island. The leading three 

One great reason for radio's great toothpastes, in order of sales are: 
appeal is the low literacy rate, which Gravi ( loca l product) 



hasn't risen a great deal even though 
many workers are making three times 
what they did in 1941. Compulsory 



Colgate 
Forhans 
and all use broadcasting extensively, 
education is decreasing the percentage of Gravi, which started with its druggist 
the population who rank subnormal en compounder sampling the interior of 
their three r's, but it will take generations Cuba dooi-to-door, has reached the top 
before newspaper readership can hope because its developer, a former druggist, 
to approach a point comparative with is promotion-minded. He not only uses 
listenership. This is the reason why such the netwoiks but schedules programs on 
a high percentage of advertising budgets local stations which cover only their 



is plowed into broadcasting and why 
radio is used by practically every manu- 
facturer seeking mass distribution. 

Only 15% of Cuban network broad- 
cast advertising business originates in 
the United States, despite the fact thai 



individual states. On these stations he 
uses the equivalent of U. S. hillbillies. At 
one time he decided to run contests to 
determine the most popular singer of folk 
songs on the island. Votes required Gravi 
carton tops. In order to make certain 



65 per cent of the advertising is for pro- that ths contest sold a number of poten- 



ducts trade-marked in the U. S. A. This 
is because the U. S. products, with very 
few exceptions, are merchandised and 
often manufactured by Cuban corpoia- 
tions. Esso products are leaders in the 
gas and oil field in Cuba, yet it is only 
by remote control that Standard Oil of 



tial users on Gravi, each folk singer's 
madrina (godmother) was urged to 
campaign for hei talented godchild. 
Since a Latin godmother does not take 



'< \m has seven, and HIK nine, station* in llirir net- 
works. Cuban network station* il<> not originate pro- 
grams, they merely ad as transmitters for key station 
programs, Cuban networks own all their stations, 



While dramatic serials lead rating parade on the two networks, in the interior it's native k 
musicians, singers and players of folk music, who reach and hold Cuban radio audiences' hearts r 



30 



SPONSOR 





U.S. watches Cuba. L.tc r.,Gil Nunn (Nunn stations), Sol Taishoff (Broadcasting), and Cal Abraham (NBC) 
CMQ's Radiocentre dominates Havana radio scene. Goar Mestre stands before his great new studios 



■■Mii^H.Lriillll II 



Cuba likes Mexican comics Solinsky and Pedro Dick & Bondi, Argentine gagsters, are tcps Blcnc'e Catmelina Rossell has rabid fcllcwing 

her responsibilities lightly, and since 
every child has a large number of god- 
parents, the campaigning for votes 
became hot and heavy. Actually the god' 
mothers turned door-to-door saleswomen 
for the product, selling the toothpaste 
and getting the carton tops for their 
candidates at the same time. 

Gravi pushes the fact that it is a Cuban 
product, created, developed, and mer- 
chandised by Cubans. This has a great 
appeal in a nation which has very few 
business organizations which are owned 
by natives. However, other Cuban pro- 
ducts haven't made Gravi's headway for 
the simple reason that they haven't had 
promotion-minded executives. The door 
to sales in Cuba is opened by brosdcast 
promotion and the obvious way to reach 
the island's population is via radio for 
only this medium cuts through and 
reaches all social strata. 

Until 1943 Cuban broadcast advertising 
practices were reminiscent of the dark 
ages of radio. With the exception of 
Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, which had a 
live program on the air, and Standard 
Oil, which has sponsored a Cuban version 
of the Esso Reporter since 1937, most 
other radio advertising was by announce- 
ments. It was not unusual for a station 
land it still isn't on some local Cuban 
stations) to have ten announcements 
broadcast back to back. It wasn't too 
long ago that time was sold for com- 
mercials from five seconds up, and no 
attempt was made to standardize com- 
mercial time. Even today the networks, 
which Have cleaned up most of their 
over-commercialization, deliver only 12' L » 
minutes for a 1 5-minute program, against 
the 14 ' .j minutes which is customary on 

Please turn to page 99) 

SPONSOR 



^^^m 












ti»; 




".It- i 





Irail«» ni;i^;ixiiM^s a$»r<M» on 



new 
name 




Nine advertising trade publications, meet- 
ing at the Hotel Biltmore, New York, on 
11 October agreed to a new name for 
spot. The term spot, which has taken on a 
double and confusing connotation within the 
advertising field in recent years, has been 
supplanted in its broader sense by selective. 

The new term will embrace all broadcast 
advertising selected on a market-by-market 
basis, whether a spot (announcement) or a 
program, whether a football game or a jingle, 
whether a transcribed dramatic program or a 
regional network broadcast. Selective will 
be used both with selective radio and 
selective television. 

Over the years the word spot, which will 
be continued solely as a designation for 
announcements, has increasingly grown to 



represent the announcement phase of broad- 
cast advertising to the great majority of 
account executives, advertising managers, and 
top executives of advertising firms. Time- 
buyers, station representatives, and station 
personnel, however, have also used it inter- 
changeably as a general term comparable to 
the term network. Substitution of selective 
as the general term will eliminate the con- 
fusion. 

Publications who have agreed to the 
change are Advertising Age, Advertising & 
Selling, Printers' Ink, Radio Daily, Rora- 
baugh Report, Sales Management, Sponsor, 
The Advertiser, and Variety. Radio Daily 
and Advertising Age began using the word 
selective as a replacement for spot several 
months ago. 



The $100 first prize winner in sponsor's 
"New Name for Spot" contest is Ray D. 
Williams of station WJHL, Johnson City, 
Tennessee. His award, for the name 
"National Selective," is on the way to him. 
Instead of the ten other awards planned 
by sponsor, 24 are being made because 
that number of readers submitted entries 
bearing at least one of the 12 names voted 
by the committee of judges as being 
worthy of an award. All the entries bear- 
ing one of the top names and which were 
postmarked on or before midnight 8 
August win a bound copy of volume one 
of sponsor. Entries postmarked after 8 

(Please tarn to page 81) 



THE WINNERS IN SPONSOR'S "NEW NAME FOR SPOT" COMPETITION 



First Prize 
Winner Name 

RAY I). WILLI VMS \ \TIONAL SELECTIVE 

11 .////. . Johnson City, Tennessee 

Honorary Mentions 
I'M I. 11 KM Kit SELECTIVE 

Paul II. Ilaynicr ('.<>., \eie )nrk 

CHARLES G. WRIGHT SELECTIVE 

Federal Advertising Agency, Inc.. Wew ) <*rk 

K1HBY CHANDLER SELECTIVE 

American Broadcasting Co., New York 

JAMES M. GRIFFITH SELECTIVE 

KSKh. Pittsburg, Kansas 

HOB McRANEl SELECTIVE 

Mid South Network, Columbus, Mississippi 



It. II. SUTHERLAND 

Hill rf Knowlton, Inc.. \eir ) ark 
WELLS II. BARNETT 



SELECTIVE 



M-B-M 
(MARKET-BY-MARKET) 

Weston Barnett, Inc.. Waterloo, Iowa 

It. W. McFADYEM SPOT 

National Broadcasting Co., Wew York 

W. \. POMEROY IMPACT 

ll II. s. Cansing, Michigan 

M \Hk k. PINkKltM V\ FOCALIZED 

Reichhold Chemicals, Inc. Detroit 



JOE COOK 

KSTP, Minneapolis 
I). I . BAIRD 
U ted >S Co., Boston 
K. II. WITHINGTON 



•\TTKR\KI> It MHO 



PV II KK\KI> It MHO 



SELECITVE VKKV 



International Silver < <>.. Weriden, < onnecticui 



WILLIAM H.RINEs 

WC.SII. Portland. Maine 

V ( .. RORABAUGH 

\ ' Rorabaugh Co., feu > ark 

JAMES K. BROWN 

II HUM. Chicago 

RALF BRENT 

WGYN-FM, Vem York 

HENRI /.. I NGER 
WPIK. Alexandria, Virginia 
VI. TANGER 

ll 111)11. Boston 

HOW Vltl) W. MEAGL1 

ll U \ I, Wheeling, West Virginia 

T. II. TR1 slow 

( horning class ll orks 
KltVNk ll. KEMP 
Compton Advertising 

I I CKER SCOTT 

' omplon Advertising 

RA1 <;. STREETER 

The t arev Xalf Co. Hutchin 



DIRECTED 

M MikKT RADIO 

MARKET It MHO 

M VRKET It VI HO 

M MtkKT RADIO 

M MtkKT K MHO 

ELECTIVE 

SKI. I < VST 
Corning, Hew York 

LOCAL RVDIO 



(Veto York 



Inc., Veto ) 'ark 



i.orvi. It MHO 



LOCAL It MHO 

n, hm 



NOVEMBER 1948 



33 




PICTURE STORY OF THE MONTH 



THREE Will 



over-all 



H< 



2" intmH llPtlnn °' ' c ' ea was mac ^ e nationwide by mc Win Elliott of "County Fair' 
Mil UUUUUUII ceived a briefing from Junior Achievement members to make him sound real JA 



Public service on commercial 
programs doesn't have to be 
stodgy, doesn't have to be heavy handed. 
It can be good entertainment. It can be 
good business. Borden's current publi- 
cizing of Junior Achievement's Junior 
County Fairs is not only good public 
service but it is building direct sales and 
good will not only for Borden's and its 
many products, but for the entire milk 
industry. 

The national Junior Achievement or- 
ganization is dedicated to the furthering 
of the "free enterprise" way of life by 
helping groups of youths set themselves 
up in business as regular corporations. If 
a number of teen-agers have a product or 
service that they tlvnk they can sell, local 
J A chapters help them incorporate, raise 
money, and set themselves up in business. 
J A corporations are formed at the rate of 
several hundreds a month. A sizable 
number have been formed this fall to 
stage Junior County Fairs. They differ 



rfotinnC 3et ' nl ° act wnen local JA groups 



tween Borden-Finch Farms execu- 




Ill 



from regular J A corporations only in that 
they are of short life (three months). 

Although Borden's was sold the idea of 
helping JA as a public service, the cam- 
paign is perfectly tied-in with its County 
Fair broadcast on CBS and its products. 
County fairs are associated in most minds 
with dairy products and that's what 
Borden's has to sell. There doesn't have 
to be any hard hitting advertising to 
associate the two in the consumer mind. 

As a final mental association, the JA 
group producing the best Junior County 
Fair wins one broadcast of the County 
Fair network program from its home town 
and under the winner's auspices. 

From beginning to end, Borden's, 
County Fair, and Junior Achievement are 
in the act equally. Nevertheless it might 
have been difficult to sell the idea to 
Borden's if its Harold W. Comford, Ben 
Duffy (BBD&O), and S. Bayard Colgate 
weren't members of JA's national com- 
mittee. A friend at court helps. 



heir entries. Group is conference in Dayton be- 
WHIO management, K&E's Landon, and JA's 




1 - idea 



was sold by Hal Davis, Kenyon & Eckhardt publicist, and Jim Keeney, Junior Achieve- 
ment press asent (above left). S. Bayard Colgate, Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, and Ben 
Duffy, BBD&O, seated above right, lend their blessing. Bill Paley, CBS (third from left 
below), is impressed. Stu Peabody and Henry Schachte, Borden's, okay campaign 




4 - point 



nf Colo ' s so ' c ' on co °P erdt ' n 9 w ' tn JA's and Borden's by Achievement members and 
III "odlb their parents. Mother buys milk while daughter sells J A stock to storekeeper 



'• 


-;,-■:■ ' 


1 






""W :»kr "■ IK 



■.if* -J 

U v ^E*"tf 2 





5' linrlor U/QU w '* n Atlanta Junior Achievers holding coke sessions C ■ Plrjp'c in Opt as St Louis group presents the Borden cow in 
UIIUol Wdy to discuss plans for their Junior County Fair entry " LlolG O III dul her boudoir as part of their County Fair show 



7 " thP nri7P is coast - l °- coast "County Fair" program presented 
I IIIC piltG from home town and under auspices of JA 

group producing most successful Junior County Fair 







What do p know about 

HII HABITS? . 



oell method helps 
sponsors understaiul listeners at work and play 



Babies even cry on schedule! 

People's living habits are 
generally relentless. 

But relentless or not living habits can 
be put to work for buyers of broadcast 
advertising. Daily routines govern with 
uncanny accuracy the size of audience to 
certain types of programs. They deeply 
influence the quality of listening to those 
programs. And listening habits influence 
buying habits. 



This theory underlies the thinking of 
William A. Yoell, who heads the market, 
media, and opinion research activities of 
William A. Yoell, Inc. This approach to 
radio programing and commercials was 
evolved by Yoell while punching door- 
bells for more than four years for adver- 
tisers and agencies. 

The practical application of Yoell's 
"living habits" to radio and TV advertis- 
ing is emerging from the experimental 



stage. His theories have already de- 
veloped a new concept of radio and video 
selling for a number of advertisers. 

A cornerstone of researcher Yoell's 
method is what he calls Camera Action 
interviewing. It's a new type of depth 
interview* he pioneered and standardized 

(Please turn to page 48) 



*Depth interviewing is a psychological form of research 
through which tlie responderrf is taken step by step from 
oriijinni stimulus to final purchase or action. 



Heavy house work reduces recognition of conversation-type programs 



What 
listeners 
are doing _ 



Misc. 

■ 



100% 



ght 
ousework 



Heavy 
Housework 



Eating 



(time) 



% that can 

identify 

character 

in 

program 













SHOT IN THE Hill , 



oi\\ i< h I'li.n iii.m ;il 
accomplishes it with radio and "The Fat 3lan"* 



JtoaMgijB It was January, 1947. Norwich products and 
1^22 ' trade names were firmly established. Net sales 

^»* for the previous year had topped a profitable 
$10,000,000. The advertising was pulling. The sales force 
was doing a good job. But something was missing from the 
selling strategy of the Norwich Pharmacal Company. 

True, sales of the familiar family of Norwich consumer 
products were holding up well with drug customers, the 
majority of whem were steady buyers. But there were many 
areas, particularly in ncnmetropolitan centers and certain 
areas of the country (parts of New England and the South) 
where sales were weak. The biggest sales problem lay in the 
over-all yearly sales curve which wandered up and down, as it 
had for decades, as druggists and public alike did their buying 
in spurts. Some Norwich products, like Pepto-Bismol, had a 
summer peak due to unwise vacation-time eating. Other 
products in the line, like Unguentine, had both summer and 
winter peaks. The problem was a real one to the sales force 
who were busy taking orders for part of the year and scratch- 
ing around for business the rest of the time. This situation 
had gone on for so long that Norwich had about given up hope 
of doing anything about it. 



The advertising was another problem directly related to 
selling. Much of Norwich's sales were traceable to their ad- 
vertising, at that time split roughly 15%-25% between maga- 
zines and newspapers on a budget of $1,250,000. Like the 
seasonal trends in Norwich business, the advertising was also 
largely unchanged for years. Norwich felt then, and still 
does, that its advertising produced results. But it was, to a 
large degree, marking time. 

Its greatest shortcomings were felt in January 1947, in the 
reaction of the sales force itself, rather than in the over-the- 
counter sales. 

Norwich differs from the great majority of drug firms in its 
selling tactics. Its products are not "jobbed," but are 
handled almost entirely by its own sales force of 150. Each 
man services about 300 drugstores directly, and the relation- 
ship between salesman and druggist is on a personal, friendly, 
conversational basis. Shipments of Norwich products are 
made from Norwich warehouses in New York, Norwich 
(N. Y.), Chicago, San Francisco, Atlanta, Dallas, and Port- 
land (Ore.), with Norwich sales offices in each of these cities 
except Portland. Thus, every member of the Norwich sales 
force regards himself as a "traveling ambassador" of the firm. 



EVOLUTION TO SPONSORSHIP 



mm 



mmm® 



mffmrnm 



DON'T 
TOUCH THAT DIAL 



■ G MONDAY 

OUT 21 



FOUR BRAND-NEW, WIRED-FOR- LISTENERS RADIO SHOWS 

PRODUCED AND PROGRAMMED BY ABC FOR CONTINUOUS RADIO LISTENING 



-ihcAnwiNin Urtjtdt 
1 -. T .n prof' 



...Im 



.lab ,Jf»fo.n( ndi" nm< l'<rm 

ntinmcBi with • <<-' ifco*i 

..h th* (rr»m tlf dflAUfK, muti 
.. Im«l <>*«tn B uftilh ••! -ir^n 

Mum at fid-i faiMlin 

M ,k,,» ... fill in IVUlablf 

.ii iK-.»i 1.1 [>r<r*«J< 1 huk '" 
Ml hrt»«rn tpiKtvarrt] ptruiix 

, \M<>» \ f*,.H»«d inrf Mi^rd 
„vl d.fnird b) Att « hrd 

,1 ntdtt by ABC 

Jbl.au MKWM « « 

J 11 »..(»« fn« nil nmtftt 

', IHCm S ihi< If* »""4 "> 

-, FOI ■ IIC MOWS iha| 

U <•* Ptdio innn^u* U*4 l>vr* 

I IK, (HOWS <h*< -'ii mfci 
. tm .--.' HMJOd cm attkt bna 



1.-,, If, ** 11 WMAJ lh* .»*** Uw 

■fUTHOum nvl ftm l«"» h..» 
• ^ «... by *??»>■'+ 

t l, nttm rtMiM *i " g""H "• 





POWERED, SMOOTH AS-SILK, TOP NOTCH RADIO ENTERTAINMENT 



ONE OF FOUR HOPEFULS 



IT'S FRIDAY NIGHT ON WXXX 

Rivet your dial to your local ABC Station 
every Friday Night . . . and you're set for 
an evening of grand entertainment. 

THE LONE RANGER 0:00 

J„.l., . R,d rl Th, A,.-..., 

THE FAT MAN 0:00 

H,.., Dri«i..» D..~. 

THIS IS YOUR FBI 0:00 

BREAK THE BANK 0:00 

THE SHERIFF. 0:00 

A ....<„,. ol L.uoki .'. Tk.,ll. 

CHAMPION ROLL CALL 0:00 

Ha.,, Vnflw < Spo.li N..i 

BOXING BOUT 0:00 

Bto- b. Bio- F.gM D#x'>pt>OA 

'O KEEP TUNED TO 00 

WXXX 

NOW IN BIG COMPANY 



In January of 1947 the salesmen found their job getting 
tougher. The retail drug business was exceeding even 1946 
sales, but druggists were making drastic reductions in over- 
extended inventories. They were selling but not buying. 

When a Norwich salesman started to talk about Norwich 
advertising to a druggist, and to show him copies of ads, the 
result was nearly always passive. Druggists were well aware 
of the magazine and newspaper advertisements Norwich had 
been doing. They asked: "So what?" — and the salesman was 
back where he started. 

What was needed, Norwich began to suspect in the closing 
months of 1946, was a change of pace — some advertising 
vehicle or medium which would give the sales force something 
to promote, a talking point with druggists. And while the 
resolve to find a new vehicle grew in the minds of Norwich ad 
men and their agency, Lawrence C. Gumbinner Advertising, 
it began to look more and more as if broadcasting might be 
the answer. 

Of one thing Norwich was sure. If they tried radio, they 
weren't going to rush in and buy the first program that 
came along. They had been in radio before. As early as 
1930, they had been placing a transcribed musical program, 
The Unguentine Show, in 15 markets. After a 13-week run, 
nothing much happened. A sample offer of Unguentine 
had pulled heavily, but the radio campaign didn't last 
long enough to make the sampling success pay off. There 
was no air advertising to remind listeners to continue to 
use the product. 

After that, they'd stayed out of radio for several years. 
The next Norwich product, Pepto-Bismol, was introduced 
successfully in 1935 with magazine advertising, no radio 
being used. However, in 1938 Norwich started a cycle 
of selective announcements which lasted until 1941, using 
6-12 announcements a week 40 weeks a year in 150 
markets. Announcement results were fair. 
( Please turn to page 74) 





r°222£> 



body love* The Fat Mon," Daihiell HomiM«'» 
myiteryd'oma It hos more luteneri ihon 75% O* oil thowi on 
the a" Thit ii •■'ro hea.y odvertiting rhot'i worth Ml weight 
in gold to you 

The Fot Mon poyt ofl on a b.g koI« when you d.tploy. 
feature, talk Pepto-Bitmol 



BROADCAST COAST TO COAST 

EVERY FRIDAY MIGHT • ABC NETWORK 



j 




WEI 


GHT CHART FOR THE FAT MAN: 




ro.s 

3.4 




























1946 


J«l MB MM APH MAY JUKI JULY MIS UPf ACT NOV tK 






C E. HOOPER RATINGS 

Trade advertising was used to call attention to the steady 
growth of the Hooperatings of "The Fat Man." It was this 
steadily increasing audience, month by month, which called the 
program to the attention of Paul Gumbinner of Norwich's adver- 
tising agency and finally clinched its sale. When a program 
triples its audience in one year, from 3.4 to 10.8, and is 
low cost, $4,500, it's usually a worth while buy and delivers. 



39 






SPONSORED 









Religion learns 
to use the air 



\i»lif hour*, and prestige methods 
improve paid religious broadcasts 



over-all 



Though religion has been a 
broadcast factor for years, 
only within the last four years have re- 
ligious bodies begun to use commercial 
religious broadcasting to bring people 
into the church. 

Not that millions of listeners haven't 
been reached and millions of dollars 
raised through sponsored religious broad- 
casts. Dollar-wise, broadcast religion is 
an important business. Spiritually, in 
the main, it has failed to deepen the 
religious convictions of the vast number 
of American people. 

A product advertising ovei the air is 
seldom sold by the station over which the 
program is heard. The listener must go 
to the store for it. With religion which is 
advertised over the air, the test cannot 
be the number of listeners, the mail pull, 
or the money that is sent in, but the 
resulting use of religion. The people 



must attest their conviction of the worth 
of religion, and publicly demonstrate it, 
by going to church and /or practicing in 
their daily living the rules which pre- 
eminently promote peace and good-will 
among men. 

Sponsored religious radio, until the 
last four years, has been mainly the instru- 
ment of religious sponsors outside of 
recognized denominational and interde- 
nominational bodies. Of the 255 denomina- 
tions in the United States, 200 represent 
only 2% of the church population. 
The majority of paying religious broad- 
casters do not'fall within even the latter 

2%. 

Broadcast religion, by an overwhelm- 
ing majority, has been a story of pulpits 
with radio congregations only, with no 
church buildings as places of worship and 
no localized congregation. No minister 
calls upon communicants, no wedding, 




Stars like Loretta Young aid Father Peyton 

burial, or charitable set vices are per- 
formed for the money received. Yet 
these same religious organizations receive 
the majority of the nearly $200,000,000 
sent in by listeners each year. 

Religion spends more money for air 
time yearly than any commercial pro- 
duct except soap. Approximately $2,500,- 
000 was spent on the Mutual Network in 
1947 for such time, and this represents a 
small fraction of the money spent on 
independent stations throughout the 
nation (many a 250-watt station depends 
on religious programs for running ex- 
penses). It is estimated that Charles E. 
Fuller who conducts the Pilgrim Hour 
from the Los Angeles Auditorium over 
160 stations and the Old Fashioned 
Revival Hour over 260 stations spent 
$4,500,000 on radio in 1946. 

Whatever the merits of their messages, 
one fact stands out with respect to the 



Bishop Sherril I and Walter Abel interviewed at "Great Plays" opening Christian Science Monitor's Erwin D.Canham specializing in good reporting 





The family that Prays Toyethei 
— ' Stays Toy ether 



830RM.SAT. 



iij]iy/]i'. | irriTt''m5i 



In the heart of Chicago a painted signboard proclaims the theme of Father Peyton's Mutual network "Family Theater" heard on WGN locally 



majority of those broadcasting religious 
programs — no accounting is required of 
them for funds received from listeners, 
either to their contributors or to any re- 
cognized national church body. 

While old commercial and sustaining 
religious programs brought the church to 
the people via the air waves, the new 
type of commercially broadcast religion 
is bending its efforts to bring people back 
to church. The old broadcasts were pre- 
dicated on the proposition that if the 
people wouldn't go to church, the church 
would come to the people. This was fine 
in theory, and in practice served, and 
still serves, shut-ins and the geographic- 
ally isolated. But by and large com- 
mercial religious broadcasting did not 
reach listeners affiliated with any recog- 
nized church body. Listeners reached 
by the message more often than not had 
no church to repair to; the minister they 
heard was a shepherd of a radio congre- 
gation only. Where church services were 
aired by recognized religious bodies, the 
influence was to a great degree negative, 
for it encouraged stay-at-home worship 
which required only the turn of the dial 
for attendance, and no contribution to 
the collection plate. The falling off of 
church attendance has been a serious 
problem of the postwar church. 

The new trend in commercial religious 
broadcasting is most markedly signalized 
by the fact that the sponsors do not 
solicit funds over the air from the audi- 
ence at large. Radio time and produc- 
tion costs are paid for by contributions 
from their members. 



The Protestant Episcopal Church's 
program Great Scenes From Great Plays is 
the newest experiment in sponsored re- 
ligious programing. This is the first time 
that a program representing the entire 
Episcopal Church membership has gone 
on the air. The half-hour weekly pro- 
gram premiered Cyrano de Bergerac, 
with Walter Hampden, on 1 October. 
It is heard by electrical transcription on 
the entire Mutual network of approxi- 
mately 500 stations, plus 300 local sta- 
tions in areas not covered by MBS. 
This nighttime sponsored religious 
broadcast, the first ever to be taken by a 
network, is aired on Fridays (8 p.m., 
EST and MST; 7 p.m., CST and PST). 

During the first four weeks, scenes have 
been broadcast from such other plays 
as The Corn is Green with Jane Cowl; 
The Barretts of Wimpole Street, with 
Basil Rathbone and Bea Straight; and 
Dark Victory, with Celeste Holm and 
Walter Abel. These will be followed by 
On Borrowed Time, Boris Karloff and 
Parker Fennelly; Little Women, Joan and 
Betty Caulfield; Tale of Two Cities, with 
Brian Aherne; and The Enchanted Cottage, 
with Gene Tierney. The plays are top 
theater, and the actors, all members of the 
Episcopal Actors Guild, are headliners. 
Earl McGill directs the shows, and Walter 
Hampden acts as permanent host. 

The program series, which it is esti- 
mated will cost $2,000,000 a year, has 
been guaranteed for the balance of 
1948. Last fall a test appeal, with no 
advance promotion , was made to the 
Episcopal dioceses for funds, and enough 



was raised for the first 13 weeks of the 
present seiies. This year a strong pro- 
motion will be made this month in all 
parishes. The Episcopal Church can- 
vasses all its members every fall in what 
is called an Every Member Canvass. 
This year, as last, the members will 
be asked to add 3% to their annual 
general contribution, for radio. The 
expectation of the National Council is 
high, for a tour by Director of Pro- 
motion Robert Jordon through the eight 
administrative provinces of the Church, 
in which Bishops and promotion leadeis 
heard the Cyrano transcription, met with 
enthusiastic response. Presiding Bishop 
Henry Knox Sherrill made four 15- 
minute appeals (to fit the four time zones) 
last 29 February for funds for an Episco- 
pal world relief fund, and by 1 August 
contributions totaled $1,360,000 and 
are still coming in. 

The radio series is being heavily pro- 
moted. Over 5,000 Episcopal clergymen 
and promotion chairmen at the parish 
and diocesan levels have received pro- 
motion packets. These contain suggested 
announcements to be made from the 
altar during the announcement period 
each Sunday. They also contain sug- 
gestions for building listenership among 
members by means of organized telephone 
groups, invitations to listen at home, 
reminders of coming programs at church 
meetings, and notices in parish bulletins. 

The "commercial" in each program 
comes in the last two and a half minutes. 
(Please turn to page 70) 



NOVEMBER 1948 



41 




Indicative of the great market represented by farmers and their families is this 25,000 who turned out to see a WLS (Chicago) antiweed demonstration 



over-all 



How in sell 




farmers 



Department of Agriculture survey ^reveals 

I hat successful farmers listen 

most to radio's rural service programs 




42 



The fact that you talk to 
rural audiences via specialized 
farm programs in practically any sec- 
tion of the country doesn't mean you 
automatically sell your services, your 
goods, or your "institution." 

The content and handling of your 
commercials, for one thing, can cost you 
up to 50% in selling effectiveness, and in 
extreme cases much more. Experienced 
farm broadcasters have arrived at some 
bedrock fundamentals to insure that 
their sponsors get the most for their time 
on the air. It sometimes happens, never- 
theless, that sponsors or agency execu- 
tives are themselves responsible for dras- 
tically reducing the potency of their own 
commercials. 

Do you want to reach the whole farm 
family, just the farmer and his wife, or 
the wife alone? The time and the type of 
program you select depends on your 
answer. 

Are there any reliable yardsticks an 
advertiser can use to identify good farm 
programing? What builds listener loy- 
alty? How can commercials be made 
more productive? The right answers to 
these questions can mean — and have 
meant— the difference between good, 
indifferent, or no return at all for pre- 
i inns advertising dollars. Fortunately, 
the most successful farm broadcasters 
have provided some good answers. 

Early-morning programs are best to 

SPONSOR 




Representative of the well-to-do Farmer who listens to Farm service type programs is this mid-New York State Family, resting during their lunch hour 



reach the whole family on the farm. The 
kids are on hand for breakfast — and the 
broadcast — before leaving for school. 
But noon programs generally reach more 
farmers and farm wives. The reasons for 
this are logical. 

The time a farm family gets up in the 
morning is governed with surprising 
consistency by the kirid of farming they 
do. A fruit grower, for example, has no 
reason to rise at 5:30 a.m., unless he's 
harvesting, or tending to some emergency, 
and he generally doesn't. A dairyman, 
on the other hand, may be up long before 
that. And if it isn't convenient for the 
farmer to arrange his morning chores to 
catch an early program, or if he thinks 
he'll get what he wants from a noon 
broadcast — he may skip the early a ; ring. 

The noon hour is another matter. 
Twelve to 1 p.m. will find the overwhelm- 
ing majority of all rural folk in the house 
for dinner. The typical radio is in the 
kitchen or dining room, wherever they 
eat, and it's usually on. It's tuned in 
most cases to a special farm program, 
when a good one is available. 

What goes into a "good" farm program 
at noon? What important difference is 
there in the noon and the early-morning 
broadcast? 

The special farm broadcast, morning 
and noon, almost invariably carries 
market and weather reports — its most 
important features. As reported in the 



first part of this article (sponsor, Octo- 
ber) they both may also carry informa- 
tion on livestock, crops, soil conserva- 
tion, machinery, labor saving devices, 
etc. 

This is important to the farm adver- 
tiser because the more progressive and 
businesslike a farmer is, the greater use 
he makes of such farm information, ac- 
cording to the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture. Thus the quality of a sta- 
tion's farm service becomes, to an im- 
portant degree, a measure of the quality 
of its farm audience. 

Market news is to the farmer what 
stock market quotations are to the finan- 
cier. The morning reports, with certain 
exceptions, are based on trading of the 
day before. They indicate the probable 
trend for the day. By noon the station's 
market reporter can give the day's actual 
quotations and trends. 

Exceptions are certain important ter- 
minal markets like New York, for ex- 
ample, where trading develops so early 
that by 6:30 a.m. it's possible for the 
radio reporter to have quotations and 
trends for the day. 

But down in Philadelphia only 84 air- 
miles away the market doesn't become 
active until 10 or 10:30 a.m., so in that 
instance noon would be the earliest a 
farmer could hear a report on the day's 
markets. A New Jersey farmer can rely 
on early morning reports to decide 



whether to head his truck to New York, 
but not to Philadelphia, or even on down 
to Baltimore. 

Naturally, the kind of produce, the 
part of the country, etc., finally determine 
the type and currency of the market- 
news broadcast. In New York, for ex- 
ample, the fruit and vegetable market is 
open from about 12 midnight to 6 a.m., 
so early morning quotations from it may 
determine a farmer's harvesting plans for 
the day. 

Producers of "price-sensitive" com- 
modities are more immediately interested 
in market news than are those dealing 
with relatively stable crops. Neverthe- 
less, according to U. S. Department of 
Agriculture surveys, the more alert and 
successful a farmer is, the greater use he 
makes of market reports in planning his 
operations — when he'll harvest, how hard 
he'll push his work, whether to hire extra 
help, where he'll market his produce, 
when to buy feed, etc. 

Some stations feel there's evidence 
that they pull as great a morning farm 
audience as they do at noon. But the 
USDA's Bureau of Agricultural Econom- 
ics survey, based on a national sample 
in 1945, revealed that of farm people who 
hear market reports, 22% listen in the 
early morning while M', listen during 
early morning, while 61% listen during 
the noon hour. Numerous independent 
surveys by stations in widely separated 



4 



NOVEMBER 1948 



43 




'Milk Queen" Candidates are honored on WLS "Dinner Bell" 



WTIC's Frank Atwcod covers 4-H youngsters Hartford County Fair. 



areas of the country confirm the fact of 
greater listenership to special farm, pro- 
grams at noon than in the early morning, 
or any other hour. However the low cost 
of the early a.m. hours make them the 
economical time to reach farmers. 

There have been no conclusive studies 
made to indicate what part of the noon 
audience of a farm program duplicates 
listeners to an early-morning broadcast of 
the same station. Contest and give-away 
mail pulls, together with other evidence, 
lead some stations to conclude tentatively 
they pull as high as 40% of their morning 
farm program audience with their noon 
farm broadcasts. Others believe they 
pull as high as 80%. 

Over-all, 12-12:30 noon is the most 
popular time for the noon airing, but 
there are exceptions. For example, 
careful tests have convinced KVOO, 
Tulsa, that the end rather than the 
beginning of the dinner hour gets better 
listening to their noon programs. Their 
listeners are more likely to remain a few 
minutes longer in the house if they are 
hearing something they are interested in 

Measuring irrigation show is KLZ feature 



than they are to come in from the fields 
or barns in time for the program start. 
So says farm editor Sam Schneider. 

The other principal ingredients of 
the typical farm program, as reported in 
part one of this story, are news (other 
than of the farm), and music. Noon 
programs are often shorter than their 
early morning counterparts; therefore 
those which use music usually have less 
music than farm-service items. The 
"strictly business" type of show and 
that which mixes farm business and 
entertainment each have loyal audiences. 

The vital questions are: what are the 
most important elements (1) in gathering 
and holding an audience, and (2) in selling 
the audience? 

The farm audience is more than 13% 
of all working people. They are by far 
the largest group of workers with common 
interests and problems. They're engaged 
in a business that today requires highly 
current and varied information. Radio is 
the swiftest, most practical way to give 
them that information, or to let them 
know it is available and where to get it. 

Phil Alampi (WJZ) reports on tomatoes 



Wallace Kadderly (KGW, Portland, 
Ore.), summed up the primary view of 
the ideal farm program as, "to advance 
the business and science of farming and 
to encourage better farm living." Just 
add the idea of entertainment and you 
have the combined views of the most 
successful farm broadcasters. 

The first way, then, to be assured of an 
audience with radios warm and waiting 
for you is to select a program that is 
authoritative and tailored to meet the 
needs of its service area. You may not be 
able to survey farm listeners, but County 
Agents of the U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture, officials in college and univer- 
sity agricultural departments, etc., can 
quickly tell you what kind of a farm 
service job a given station is doing in 
its area. 

Size of a station isn't the only factor. 
A tea pot (250-watter) like WENY, 
Elmira, N. Y., may have a farm pro- 
gram that actually dominates its own 
area. WENY does a job for local firms 
like Ray Reliable Credit Jewelers, as 
(Please turn to page 96) 

Crop reports are KSBW (Salina, Calif.) favorite 




CKLW CAN 

PUT YOUR 

PRODUCT OVER 



in 



tu DETROIT a*** 




de^Uutely <jet MCJ K Ll ^^ tm f ulc ^ i /r°* ^ ed/i 



tf&U 



CKLW 



50,000 WATTS, SOON! To keep well ahead of the expanding needs of this 
fast-growing market ... to encourage a greater loyalty to public service and to strengthen our already 
enviable position with listeners and advertisers alike . . . CKLW will soon broadcast with 50,000 
watts. This greater voice will give the Detroit Area's best radio buy a new selling wallop beyond 
duplication in this region! Watch for announcements to come! 



Guardian Bldg., Detroit 26 Adam J. Young, Jr., Inc., Nat* I Rep. 

J. E. Campeau , President H. N. Stovin & Co., Canadian Rep. 



NOVEMBER 1948 45 



selective 
radio 
trends 



Based upon the number of programs and an- 
nouncement: placed by sponsors with stations 
and indexed by Rorabaush Report on Sel- 
ective Radio Advertising. Reports for, August 
'47-July '48 are averaged as a base of 100 



As expected, selective radio business in September was up over the 
last 12-month average. Greatest increase was noted in Pacific Coast 
area with index being 25% higher than the average. New England 
and Mid-West continues to be off slightly, but not enough to keep 
the national trend from continuing up. Only category to show 
sizeable increase was Drugs which was twice its August index 
average. Food continues to dip showing the greatest loss of any 
industry category. The national trend is based upon 235 sponsors 
up 18 from August. Inability to obtain guaranteed time due to 
political broadcasting has held back business placement until after 
election. There is every indication that there will be a solid upsurge 
in selective radio placement during November. 



Per cent 



250 — 
200 — 
150 — 
100 — 
50 — 



AUG SEP L OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL 



Based upon reports from 2 35 * Sponsors 

Aug. '47— July 48 average = 100.0% 





Trends by Geographical Areas 1948-1949 



AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL 



250- 2,280,000 Radio families 



200 H 
150 



100- 

50 



Da 



250 
200 
150 H 
100 
50 



9,166,000 Radio families 



250 
200 
150 -I 
100 
50 



11,387,000 Radio families 



250- 
200 
150 
100 
50 



6,399,000 Radio families 



250 - 
200 
150 
1CKH 



4,766,000 Radio families 




b0 



New England 



Middle Atlantic 



Mid-W**i«ri* 

I^Iillil^PllI 



—i«rn 



t 



Pacific m4 



850 

soo ■ 

150 



Trends by Industry Classifications 1948-1949 

77 Sponsors reporting 



AUG SEP OCT NOV DEt JAN" FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL 



S50 . 33 Sponsors reporting 
soo 



150 
100 

so 




Food 



Coirf«c0on«y 



'For Ihli total « sponsor li regarded ai a tingle 
be reported under a number of classifications. 

46 



corporate entity no matter how many diverse diviiions it may include. In the industry reports, however, the same sponsor may 

SPONSOR 



HEART#BEATS 



SPECIAL TRADE PAPER EDITION 



J/iOTft the Meant off &vvie/zica, 



KANSAS CITY, OCTOBER, 1948 



RADIO'S TOUGHEST AUDIENCE CHECK 



KMBC-KFRM Team 

Pioneers in Serving 

Vast Trade Area 

When KFRM went on the 
air last December 7, it was 
the first time in history that 
the government had permitted 
the operation of a broadcast 
transmitter a great distance 
from the main studios. Over 
200 miles of special circuits 
connect the transmitter, 10 
miles south of Concordia, in 
Cloud County, Kansas, with 
the KMBC-KFRM studios in 
Kansas City. 

When Governor Carlson 
threw the switch a new radio 
voice for Kansas City's great 
trade territory was born — The 
KMBC-KFRM Team. 

"The Team," an entirely 1 new 
radio term, now is a household 
word to millions who depend 
on it for the best rural pro- 
gram service. Many members 
of the advertising fraternity 
have tested and studied its ef- 
fectiveness. 

A dream of Arthur B. 
Church, founder and president, 
has become a reality. With 
The KMBC-KFRM Team he 
has accomplished Kansas City 
primary trade area coverage 
otherwise unobtainable. 
* Phil Evans, director of 
KMBC-KFRM Service Farms, 
and associate Ken Parsons, are 
two of the best livestock and 
agronomy experts on radio to- 
day. They deliver practical in- 
formation, as does Bob Riley 
who broadcasts the livestock 
markets direct from the Live- 
stock Exchange. Home econ- 
omist Betty Parker and home- 
maker Caroline Ellis assist in 
providing a great home infor- 
mational service. Erie Smith 
heads a great news depart- 
ment — tops on "hometown 
headlines," too. Sam Molen 
.sportscaster. author, is nation- 
ally recognized in his field 
The KMBC-KFRM Schoolhouse 
programs have repeatedly won 
national honors. 

The entertainment field is 
not overlooked, and the KMBC- 
KFRM program staff of full- 
time professional talent is the 
finest in theentire middle west. 

KPRM has doubled the po- 
tential listening audience of 
great program - building sta- 
tion KMBC. Together, "The 
Team" is enriching the lives 
of the Kansas City Trade Ter- 
ritory. 

NOVEMBER 1948 




Kansas Governor 
Reports to People 
Over Station KFRM 

Governor Frank Carlson of 
Kansas brings timely "Re- 
ports to the People" of the 
State each Sunday afternoon 
at 1:30 p.m. on KFRM. The 
Governor, at KFRM inaugural 
ceremonies, stated: "With 
KFRM, the farmers and stock- 
men of Kansas have reliable 
radio service from the great 
Trade capital, Kansas City." 



More Than 10,500 KFRM Listeners 
Respond as Mercur y Hits 100° 

Audience Loyalty Unprecedented 

During the two week period from July 25 through 
August 7, Station KFRM conducted an audience 
contest, resulting in an avalanche of mail from loyal 
listeners totaling 10,800 pieces. 

Despite flood conditions in the State of Kansas 
the first week, of sufficient proportions to isolate 
many communities, and a heat | centage of votes went to the 



wave the second week that 
sent the mercury up to 100 
degrees, the letters poured in. 
The KFRM audience in their 
response demonstrated a loy- 
alty that is unprecedented — 
and this in the lowest audience 
response season of the year! 

Listeners were invited to 
write 50 words or less on "My 
Favorite KFRM program is 
because". 

Every single program on 
KFRM received numerous 
votes as the favorite. It is sig- 
nificant that the largest per- 



KFRM Programs Link Rural Audience 
To Trade Center 



The KMBC - KFRM Team 
brings millions of listeners in 
the territory, who look to 
Kansas City as their trade 
capital, valuable service in the 



form of market broadcasts, 
grain, poultry and produce 
quotations, news and informa- 
tional features, and good en- 
tertainment. 





Mi»OU*l 




1 
1 


*^A-* \ 


C.^ 














/ S | 








i * 






1 


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-' 


**„- -/"**" 




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I DESPR 



Shaded map shows 

mer contest, together with KMBC-KFRM 



Ti response m KT*.\5 



sum- 
contours. 



KFRM features devoted to 
agricultural activities. The 
economic factor of receiving 
reliable, up - to - the - minute 
market and farm information 
(which aids farm families) 
was mentioned repeatedly by 
contest entrants. "Interesting 
presentation of facts" was 
praised. 

Entertainment groups and 
personalities of The KMBC- 
KFRM Team received gener- 
ous mention, too, indicating 
the popularity of the talent 
staff. Such outstanding enter- 
tainment programs as The 
Texas Rangers, Dinnerbell 
Roundup, Brush Creek Follies, 
and Western Roundup, re- 
ceived hundreds of first place 
votes. 

Quite surprising to the con- 
test judges was the fact that 
several hundred entrants, al- 
though asked to name a single 
KFRM program, chose to 
write their letter about the 
station or the entire list of 
programs carried by KFRM. 
Many entrants stated quite 
frankly that it was somewhat 
difficult for them to select a 
particular favorite, since in 
their opinion, there were nu- 
merous programs they con- 
sidered outstanding. 

This splendid response to 
the contest, during a normally 
slow season for letter writing, 
made further slower by the 
handicap of floods and a heat 
wave, proves clearlv that 
KFRM, teamed with* KMBC 
has won the loyal attention of 
millions of listeners in the 
Kansas City Trade area and 
is performing a vital service 
for them. 

47 



WIP 

Jn*oduees 







"Kitchen Kapers", a half-hour "cross- 
the-board" morning food quiz, is 
another producer! 

Begun in September, 1917, "Kitchen 
Kapers" entered its second year 
with 100% renewal of the original 
1 participating sponsors . . . and 1 1 
added starters! 

\\ ant to sell food? 



WIP 

Ph ila delph ia 
Basic Mutual 



Reprvnpnted Nationally 
EDU AIUI PETRY & CO, 




48 



LIVING HABITS 

(Continued from page 37) 

while collecting data on living habits for 
such organizations as Young & Rubicam, 
Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn, 
Procter & Gamble, and others. 

The data Yoell accumulated led him to 
a concept of the "disposed audience." 
"Disposed" listeners are distinguished 
from other tuners-in as follows: 

1 . They must be actually in a physical 
position to listen. 

2. They must be engaged in activities 
that permit them to hear the piogram 
(including commercials) with adequate 
attention. (Standards have been worked 
out for checking the quality of attention a 
listener gives certain type programs while 
engaged in various activities.) 

3. They must be able to prove they are 
listening by identifying certain program 
elements. 

In addition to enabling a sponsor to 
identify specifically that part of an audi- 
ence which is disposed to hear his program 
and selling messages, Camera Action 
studies tell a sponsor how to get more 
penetration and appeal in his commer- 
cials. Analysis of Yoell developed data 
uncovers basic motivations in the use of 
products and services. Tobacco, candy, 
dry cereals, and railroads are some of the 
subjects on which Yoell's variation of 
depth interviewing has revealed facts 
vital to advertisers. 

Most people's activities revolve in rigid 
patterns around a few fundamental ne- 
cessities in the circle of living. These 
bedrock necessities are taking care of 
their business, their homes, their lives, 
and their relationships with others. 
There's little room for variation. That's 
why planning radio advertising around 
inexorable routines can turn such living 
habits into gold. 

A national user of daytime radio com- 
missioned Yoell to get the facts on the 
"disposed" daytime audience in a major 
metropolitan market. 

He learned that Mrs. Average House- 
wife is up at 7:00, gets her husband off to 
work about 8:00, sends the offspring to 
school around 8:30, and spends the next 
hour ('til about 9:30) washing dishes, 
wiping the stove, and doing light kitchen 
cleaning. After a second cup of coffee, 
she straightens up the house and about 
10:00 is ready for the heavy household 
tasks, such as laundry, scrubbing, and 
heavier cleaning. 

The period from about 10:00 to 11:30 
is generally reserved for the heavy tasks. 
(Please turn to page 52) 

SPONSOR 



WNJR 

NEWARK 

announced 
Sie a/t/wdntwient o£ 

Avery- Knodel, Inc. 

New York Atlanta San Francisco Los Angeles Chicago 

a& t/iefo national siefe/ie&entatmeb 
e££ectiwe immediatetu 



WNJR 

Newark, New Jersey 
5000 Watts 1430 Kilocycles 

£RacUc Station o£ t/ie tAetwa/iA *Aew4> 






NOVEMBER 1948 49 






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the man behind over ZUU Successful sales curves 






^i^i„±: ~ 




r __._,*,«..* _ — 


lor the sponsor interested in sales. Singm' Sam presents a unique ---J- 


.« _ _ _ — 




lis 


opportunity. For never in radio's history has there been a personality 


1: 




i "■»•—— -~ — 


Jike 3am . . . never before a program series with such an outstanding 




,~. , 111 •!«*•! 




_j — _ _ reeoru ot major sales successes unbroken by a single failure. 




These are strong statements t 






hat carry tremendous weight with 








prospective program purchasers ... it supported bv tacts. And facts | 




I'll 1 • 1 ¥¥ 1 1 




„„»,.« „»,«»»». „.* we nave in abundance . . . high Hoopers, congratulatory letters, ex- 




• e 1 • . • I. 1 m.« »U 1 1 




.*m ,*► *. _„ *. _ _ h». _ „ .. pressions ol real appreciation 






it i «*« ■ i» i i 


with the concrete figures. ^*^0 Hi 
ocram series is the -Imu ^^r ^ 






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■ _ _ vou need to produce results. 


Write, wire, or telephone ^^ II 


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*"Mm a tremendous ^F i ^k 


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popularity and pull, the show 


reasonably priced. ^^^« ^k 






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SPONSOR 




NOVEMBER 1948 



51 






WF££'s mat 



C. E. HOOPER 

SH A R E-OF- A U DIENCE 

REPORTS 




MORNINGS AFTERNOONS 



MAY- JUNE 



JUNE-JULY 



JULY- AUGUST 



11 



th 



th 



13 



8 ,h 11 



th 



th 



M*t th* SEPTEMBER 



Hi 



SIMCHSE 






/?*& FREE & PETERS afout . 



WFBL • WFBL-FN 

BASIC CBS 
IN SYRACUSE . . . THE NO. 1 STATION 



52 



LIVING HABITS 

(Continued from page 48) 

This holds true throughout the week for 
78% of all housewives who listen to the 
radio. It's around 2:00 p.m. before most 
dialers have completed the heavier tasks 
of the day. Routines vary with changes 
in the seasons, changes in family composi- 
tion, and changes in the socio-economic 
status of the family. 

The evidence, shown visually in the 
chart illustrating this story, boils down to 
two principles of utmost importance in 
planning radio to reach the most disposed 
ears for the least money : 

1. When women are doing laundry, 
scrubbing floors, taking care of children 
and babies, they can not generally follow 
conversation programs attentively. (But 
they can follow music fairly attentively.) 

2. When women are engaged in light 
household activities, sewing, straighten- 
ing up, etc., they can follow conversation 
or any type of programs attentively. 

Yoell found a high correlation between 
the ability to identify certain program 
elements, such as a character in a con- 
versation program, or a specific musical 
phrase or title in a music program, and the 
ability to remember advertising claims. 
This relationship between type of activity 
and type of program holds true in prin- 
ciple throughout the country, for both 
men and women, and for day or night. 

The manufacturer underwriting this 
particular study received some amazing 
figures on the difference between "audi- 
ences" generally and a "disposed audi- 
ence." Here's an enlightening illustra- 
tion: 

Twenty-five percent of the women with 
radios tuned to a conversational program 
were at the time playing with or watching 
the baby or else busy with chores outside 
the house! Their radios were in the 
living room. Another S c ' t , whose radios 
were also" in the living room, were in the 
kitchen finishing their laundry. 

By applying a formula (developed and 
owned exclusively by his organization) to 
the research data, Yoell can provide a 
disposed audience rating that tells an 
advertiser how many people actually 
heard, or heard and viewed, his com- 
mercial. 

Camera Action interviewing and analy- 
sis of its data, report experiences that 
help build motivations in the use of 
products and services. It defines these 
motivations. This story in turn gives the 
sponsor more productive copy themes for 
reaching his prospects. 

This type qi interview, said to be ex- 
(Please turn to page 66) 

SPONSOR 



A STATEMENT OF 

MUTUAL'S POSITION ON 

"AUDIENCE BUYING" AND"GIVEAWAY" PROGRAMS 



By EDGAR KOBAK, President, Mutual Broadcasting System 



THERE lias been widespread misunderstanding about the 
issues involved in "giveaway" programs on the air. The 
confusion may be traced to two principal factors: (1) incorrect 
and loose use of the term "giveaway" and its application to 
two distinctly different types of shows; and (2) the misunder- 
standing arising from the difference in the objectives of the 
FCC on the one hand and the NAB Code on the other. 

Tliis statement of Mutual Broadcasting System's position 
is an attempt to clear the air. 



First, then, let us consider the confusion in the term "give- 
aways." There arc, as we said, two distinct types of programs 
involved — one which rewards the listener for listening (or 
which "buys" an audience) and the other which rewards par- 
ticipants in the show— someone selected from the studio audi- 
ence or someone who submits material used in the program, lb 
clarify this distinction, we suggest these definitions: 

a. programs which give away prizes to the radio audience 
for the purpose of getting it to listen. Because the usual 
device by which this works is the telephone, these might 
be termed "telephone-call" shows; 

b. programs which give away prizes to the studio audience 
for participation and to persons submitting material for 
the shows, and in which the reason for listening is pro- 
gram and not prizes. We might call these "giveaways"— 
more accurately, they are "audience participation" shows. 

Now as to the difference in the aims and objectives of the 
NAB Code and the FCC. The Code (which becomes effec- 
tive January 1 , 1949) seeks to eliminate programs which "buy" 
an audience. Here is what it says on the subject: 

"Any broadcasting designed to 'buy' the radio audience, by 
requiring it to listen in the hope of reward rather than for 
the quality of entertainment should be avoided." 
Obviously, this language needs clarification, because there 
is still considerable disagreement as to what constitutes "buy- 
ing" an audience. But we'll come back to this later. 

The FCC's objection, on the other hand, is based on Sec- 
tion 316 of the Communications Act which was deleted as of 
September 1. 194S. and rewritten with no substantial change 
as Section 1 304 of the U.S. Criminal Code by the 80th Con- 
gress and became effective September 1 . This section prohibits 
the broadcast of "... any lottery, gift enterprise, or similar 
scheme . . ." 

# * * 

After consideration of the entire problem. Mutual decided 
not to broadcast "audience buying" shows. We made our 
stand public and the general and trade press carried the story 
on September 1. Here's the way wc look at it. 



As members of the NAB, we have subscribed to the Code. 
We will live up to it. We think the provision about "buying 
an audience" docs not need to be changed, but rather— clari- 
fied and strengthened. 

And so, by January 1, wc will eliminate from our network 
any program which we believe "buys" its audience. One of 
our programs has already been taken off the air. 

On the other hand, shows like our "Queen For A Day", 
"True Or False", "Take A Number", "The Better Half", 
"Quick As A Flash" will be continued, because, as wc sec it, 
they come under the program type we defined as "audience 
participation." 

In brief: wc arc going to discontinue "audience-buying" 
shows because we intend to live up to the Code of our industry; 
also, wc feel that shows which depend on prizes and devices to 
gain listening, are not good radio and, in the long run, not 
good for radio. (We think broadcasting is here to stay!) 



Our action was not taken because of the FCC's "entirely in- 
terpretative" rules which "do not purport to add to or detract 
from the statutory prohibition" against lottery programs. 

For one thing, a substantial body of legal opinion seems 
agreed, despite the FCC, that "telephone-call" shows as such 
cannot legally be stopped. There would seem to be confirma- 
tion of this in the fact that, although Section 316 had been in 
the Communications Act for years, the FCC apparently con- 
sidered it necessary to write up new rules — just at the time 
when the NAB Code is beginning to take effect. 

For another thing, we are convinced that we do not need 
the FCC to tell us broadcasters what is right or wrong with 
programming. And, it is our belief that once the Code is in 
operation the FCC may well have "lottery" rules — and no 
programs to use them on. 



But now comes a danger to which wc cannot close our eves. 
If the industry, reaching the decision that "audience- 
buying" programs are poor radio, should abandon them, there 
may well be no more "telephone-call" shows for the FCC to 
forbid. But it is conceivable that the FCC may use the new 
rules to move in on "studio giveaway" shows, even though 
broadcasters and listeners both want them. 

To put this in another way: if it is possible, today, for the 
FCC to say "away with giveaways"— it will be possible, tomor- 
row for the same or another body to say "away with mysteries, 
or symphonies, or comics, or drama or documentaries." 

It will be possible, the day after tomorrow, for some group 
to say "away with freedom of the air." 



MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 



WORLD'S LARGEST NETWORK 










A 





The 

I'it'koil l*;inH 
answers 
31r. Il> slop 

The fact of the 
matter is that 
Storecast is a rare 
and hard-to-classi- 
fy bird which re- 
fuses to fit neatly 
into any known 
pigeon hole. 

Actually, Store- 
cast is advertising; 
it is merchandis- 
ing; it is sales promotion — and then some. 
Inasmuch as Storecast transmits com- 
mercial announcements to substantial 
audiences in the millions, you can call it 
"advertising." 

Inasmuch a« Storecast 's audiences are 
finely-screened guaranteed audiences of 
customers right at the point of sale in 
several hundred supermarkets (in addi- 
tion to FM home listeneis in the metro- 
politan Chicago area) you might call us 
"advertising — and then some." 

Inasmuch as Storecast employs crews 
of merchandise men who visit all these 
supermarkets biweekly to see to it that 
our sponsors' products are kept in con- 
stant good supply, that they are well dis- 
played and stacked in good shelf position, 
you can call us "merchandising." 

Inasmuch as Stoiecast employs other 
research crews who inventory all Store- 
cast products to determine sales effective- 
ness and who maintain a running panel of 
product movement for our subscriber's 
benefit, you should probably call us 
"merchandising — and then some." 

Inasmuch as Storecast conducts pro- 

54 



Mr. Sponsor Ms ... 



"From which budget should an advertiser take 
promotional dollars for storeeasting — Advertising? 
Sales promotion? Merchandising?" 

Hector J. Hyslop 



Associate Advertising Manager 
Diamond Crystal-Colonial Salt Division 
General Foods Corporation, N. Y. 



motional efforts which involve such things 
as holiday programs for supermarket per- 
sonnel, product demonstrations, produc- 
tion and staging of supermarket food 
festivals, and so forth, you can call us 
"sales promotion." 

Inasmuch as our promotional efforts in- 
clude the conditioning of customers with 
soothing "music to buy by" and create an 
atmosphere which may reduce tension and 
fatigue, thereby keeping the customer in 
the store a little longer, you might r?ll us 
"sales promotion — and then some." 

Storecast is a combination of all of the 
above and hence it can't properly be said 
that the advertisers' dollars should come 
from any of the three categories indicated 
in your question. The fact is that Store- 
cast is a category by itself and at least one 
of our subscribers — one of the nation's 
largest food advertisers — has already set 
up a separate category in its budget 
labeled "Storecast." 

As to where money for that separate 
category should come from, it is difficult 
to evaluate the exact percentage which 
should be paid out of advertising, mer- 
chandising, or sales promotion. 

In a few isolated instances where Store- 
cast has sold announcements alone with- 
out any of the additional features of mer- 
chandising or sales promotion — an an- 
nouncement campaign for the world pre- 
miere of a movie in Hartford is a case in 
point — we figured announcements at 
about 65% of our established rate. I 
would say that the breakdown might be 
advertising 65%, merchandising 25%, 
and sales promotion 10%. 

I wish I could have answered this ques- 
tion in fewer words and could have seemed 
less vague, but this is not a new problem 
to us and to many of the agencies with 
which we have dealt, and this is the best 
answer we've ever been able to come up 
with. 

Incidentally, thanks very much for the 
tribute to Storecast in making it appear 




in your question as a good generic word in 
lower case. Actually — and please don't 
think me stuffy for saying it— "Storecast" 
is our coined and registered name. 

Stanley Joseloff 

President 

Storecast Corp. of America, N. Y. 



The choice be- 
tween taking pro- 
motional dollars 
for storecasting 
from advertising, 
sales promotion, or 
merchandising is 
really not a three- 
way choice at all. 
It's a two-way 
choice. 
Since few if any advertisers maintain 
separate "merchandising budgets " the 
answer to your question lies in a choice 
between charging point-of-sale FM radio 
operations to either advertising or sales 
promotion. From my own experience in 
merchandising operations, I would say 
that it would best be charged to sales 
promotion. 

There are several good reasons for this. 
Pint of all, it's the job of the sales de- 
partment to see that store stocks keep up 
with any increases of purchasing caused 
by storecasting. If storecasting is a 
function of the advertising department, a 
lot of time may be wasted in paper work 
and routine before the sales department is 
aware of what storecasting is doing at a 
store location, or when new storecasting 
promotions arc due to start. Since the 
greatest storecasting impact is in stores, 
it is primarily a point-of-sale device. 

Secondly, it is just as easy to integrate 
storecasting into other point-of-sale pro- 
motions as it is to add it to broadcast 
schedules. Displays are usually made up 
far in advance, and made so that special, 

(Please turn to page 59) 

SPONSOR 



WCAO 

BALTIMORE 




r~^ 



^mm^ 



"Just ask your 
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PI <■ " is a welcome addi- 
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Here are the programs with the biggest audiences* 
in Television: 

TOAST OF THE TOWN (CBS-TV) with a 40.7 rating in 
its top quarter-hour, tops all other Television ratings. 

CBS-TV NEWS is the highest-rated news show in all 
TELEVISION, with 10.8. 

CBS- TV has all three of the top "strip" variety and 
musical shows: FACE THE MUSIC, with a 12.7 rating; 
PLACES, PLEASE, with a 10.9 rating; BOB HOWARD, 
with a 10.1 rating. 

CBS-TV has the two top "audience participation" 
shows: WHAT'S IT WORTH?, with a 14.7 rating; WINNER 
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And . . . 

WCBS-TV leads all other New York Television sta- 
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average quarter-hour between 8:00 and 11:00 p. in. 






• L*t*«t Puts,- Rutin* Report S«pt. I94S 



"Face the Music." CBS-TVs 15- 
minute across-the-board airer. con- 

*nt U hl«ht. OI, r. 0f 'u he most cont- 
ent high-quality shows on the air 
Web has recently added much more 
production value by providing 
songsters Johnny Desmond an! 
Sandn Deel with a different set 
each night. While the format is 
always the same, the different back- 
ground gives the show a new look 
fSni ea « Stanza -, T " u "day night 
Mi« n r , cx , amDl *. Desmond and 
Miss Deel featured Latin songs 
against a Mexican backdrop, while 
the following night they sang ro- 
mantic ditties against a simulated 
seashore. 

Two vocalists demonstrated com- 
plete ease before the cameras pro- 
jecting their ingratiating personal- 
!>, es a ? niftllv as their songs. Tony 
Mottola trio backed them excel- 
lently, and the Idea of giving Mot- 
tola some comedy "business" has 
nypoed the show considerably. In 
all. it remains a fresh, youthful 
presentation and a highly-promis- 
ing investment for several cate- 
gories of advertisers, vahiktv 



vision programming- «« abe tttng 
and. auditory appeal, eac n lng 

^e <>*«•, n \ S m C o°no ony »nd Its tor- 

Th ere^-e £--£ 
^d°te -^ m ^S t \ n hit r is brought 
nrogram. ana mui-i me \ 

P o r u? *nen the guest el ^ { 
came to «■ * ft ° go odly amount ot 

amount of hum ° r nm Ration anent 
c ™psupmBOode°mer dgar store 

, ne workmanship 
Indians and other 

Fates Good >i „.„ 

W o happy JSiuttK program, 
to be mentioned about t ™ ^ Job 
First OH F« <cs d m „letelv at ease 
* "emcee. He ^"d what is »*l 
klore the ««« r important, he was 
haps even more in v ,„ lne 

able to transmit tnu m was 

guests. Secondlj- thj- V mll „. 

done in such a iac " c arcc lv conscious 
ncr that one «f scarce fc ar e 
n problems o tec* nlQ , „„ 

still present in tc accolad0 t0 

can think of no rodu cers. 

the cameramen and v BJ , !boar d 



s een„,j ,* ' KLE < RE) VIE W „ ' 

r'r « Aril's ':;:— ;",;..,. •■'-;--..n 

s Park„, bj F.i s V '"•'-' of the! " • "" h ">o 

: '" ■•" r --'M. ,,,;: ■" ( ' ,v «" '>.,„■„;", '"""•• show. 
" hp " rf "^ 1 "■n.„\ M ' , ' ,h,h '--^v ; , . , ; < , i ,,, ' nc «'« 

•■in extra . :i Grade A ,. • ,hl,s f«r ,„ 

sws&es-w^ 

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Network Calibre Programs at Coeal Station Cost 



STEIN WAY HALL 



113 WEST 57th STREET • NEW YORK 19, N 




(Continued from page 54) 

last-minute promotions can be featured at 

very little extra expense. 

Thirdly, sales promotion budgets, un- 
like advertising budgets which are deter- 
mined a year or so in advance, are more 
flexible, and can allow for the addition of 
exploratory expenditures in new mediums. 
Walter Ennis 
Merchandising Director 
Calkins & Holden, N7 Y. 

The question 
posed by Mr. 
Hyslop is a good 
one. Storecasting 
and its competi- 
tors offer an ac- 
tivity which is hy- 
brid in nature. It 
is an advertising 
medium in that it 
calls the attention 
of the consumer to the merits of specific 
products. It is also a merchandising tool 
in that the contract includes extra retailer 
activity at the point of sale. Hence, 
there is good reason to ask: "Should I 
charge the cost to the advertising or to 
the sales promotional budget?" 

Despite the importance of the merchan- 
dising value of storecasting and allied 
services, our clients have considered it a 
very proper charge against the advertising 
budget. Even before FM was added, it 
was regarded as a medium which had 
many of the characteristics of radio. 
With FM, the resemblance becomes more 
pronounced. 

Furthermore, the cost of the service is 
more in line with advertising than with 
sales promotion budgets. A year's con- 
tract for the two services now being 
offered amounts to about $30,000 to cover 
only three areas. If that figure were pro- 
jected nationally, it is pretty obvious that 
it would be well beyond the limits of a 
budget for sales promotion or merchan- 
dising. 

Fred B. Manchee 

Vp, Research, Marketing & 

Merchandising 
Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn 
N. Y. 



It's apparent 
that the store 
broadcasting serv- 
ice does a three- 
way job. It's ad- 
vertising; it's sales 
promotion; and 
it's merchandising. 
And it's clear too, 
that since it does 
all three, its bud- 




get can't be assessed categorically against 
any one of the three activities. In the 
absence of a good theoretical basis, allo- 
cation had to be arrived at pragmatically. 
And, since no two advertisers seem to 
have had exactly the same set of problems, 
there have been almost as many prag- 
matic solutions as there have been 
advertisers. The shift to FM means that 
along with the store audience, the adver- 
tiser also reaches the growing block of FM 
homes in the Chicago market. FM was 
adopted because telephone lines weren't 
available for all the Jewel Tea outlets. It 
further complicated budget procedures 
However, while the solutions have 
differed in detail, some general patterns 
have emerged. They have shaped up in 
this way. 

1. Allocation According to the Importance 
of Function 

An advertiser may not feel that all 
three of the functions are of equal im- 
portance. One may believe that major 
national media should carry all of his 
advertising load and that the importance 
of store broadcasting is in its sales promo- 
tion or merchandising efficacy. Thus he 
will allot the entire budget to one or the 
other of those two activities. Another 
advertiser may look on store broadcasting 
as being valuable only for its reminder 
advertising. 

2. For Three Jobs You Pay Three Ways 
A few advertisers feel that because the 

service operates in three areas, its cost 
should be evenly split three ways. They 
believe that it's either too difficult or im- 
possible to assess the value of each 
function. 

3. The Pragmatic Approach 

When Consumer's Aid was first pre- 
sented, many advertisers were in the 
middle of their budget year, and there was 
no provision for such a service. So these 
advertisers did the pragmatic thing. They 
looked around for extra money in all three 
budgets and took what was needed from 
each to buy the service. 

4. A Separate Fund 

A few advertisers confounded by the 
problem of dividing costs, instead of 
splitting it, rightly, we think, set up a 
special appropriation for store broadcast- 
ing. 

While it's possible to go into many more 
variations of cost distribution, our experi- 
ence to date has brought us to these 
tentative conclusions. We say tentative, 
because we feel that after everyone has 
had some more experience with store 
broadcasting, many current ideas will be 
revised. 

(Please turn to page 64) 



i i,ivi;-innmi 
hike 




oemmts 
Aftmr 

The lifeless body of lovely Marie LaRue, 
clad only in a filmy nightgown, lay face 
down in the half-filled bathtub. Still 
clutched in her right hand was the bar 
of a towel rack, and on the wall above 
the tub's inner surface a broken section 
of the bar's supporting knobs gave a 
graphic picture of what had happened. 
The hotel doctor, standing with Homi- 
cide Lieutenant Evans in the bathroom 
doorway, gave his reconstruction of the 
accident. "One of the maids found her 
this way, Lieutenant. Evidently Miss 
LaRue had started to step into the tub 
while holding to the towel rack for sup- 
port. It broke and she fell, knocked un- 
conscious when her head struck against 
the inner edge of the tub. Death was the 
result of drowning." 

"Except for one fact," the officer said, 
"I would say you are right. But that one 
fact strongly indicates this woman was 
murdered." 

(Solution below) 
"Mike Mystery" is a feature of a 15-minute 
transcribed music and mystery show avail- 
able 5 times weekly for national, regional 
or local sponsorship on 600 Lang-Worth 
affiliated stations. For full information, 
contact your station or its representative. 

LAM-WORTH 

feature programs, inc. 

Network Calibre Programs 
at £oeal Station Cost 

STEINWAY HALL, 113 WEST 57TH ST. 
NEW YORK 19, N. Y. 



THE SOLUTION 

•UMoamam e SuueaM a||L|M qniqieq e 
0)U| sdais ueuiOM ou jeq) si pa^ooiJaAO aq |eqM )ng 
l|.i-.|i qn) aq) o)u| 8uidda)s Uj )|asjaq jioddns 0| 
aq p|noM qn) aq) puiqaq ||cm aq) uo paicooi *pej 
|3moi e jo pioq ua>|C) a«eq pinoM anyen ssjw uos 
-eaj A|uo aq) jeqi 3uiAes ui pajjoa sem jopop aqi 



WARNING: 



J"M!ke Mysteries" are protected by 
(copyright Anyone making use ol this 
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Feature Programs, Inc., is liable to prosecution. 



NOVEMBER 1948 



59 









em 



television hi ■'■■»>■ i ;\ i 

SPONSOR: Park Camera U.IM 'I : Placed direci 

CAPSULJ I \-l HISTORY: This Huntington Park 
camera m<</>- advertised television tables m $25 on four 
3-minute participations. Twenty-five were bought, some 
by phone and some by customers who traveled all the way 
to Huntington Park to get them. The same store demon- 
strated television boosters priced at $27.95, and sold 7.5 of 
them, all as a result of television demonstrations. Park 
Camera has also had sales success with other television 
items like " alco lenses, etc. 



k I I \. Los Angeles 



PROGR Wl: "Shopping at Horn. 



TV 

results 



V 



ALLIGATOR FARM 



SPONSOR: Harrv Hum 



AGENCY: Placed direct 



CAPSULE CASE HIS K )\{ -\ ■. During the Sunday night T) 
program, " Magazine of the It eel;." Harry Hunt of the 
I /// gator Farm showed a 5-minute film of his trained 
alligator which is often used by Hollywood studios, is a 

result of this general interest film. Harry Hunt reported 
that in addition to normal paid attendance, over 300 
persons visited the litigator Farm the following week. 

Yfosl of them slated that they had been attracted by the 
alligator movie on the television show. 

K I LA, I .<.- Angeles PROGR Wl: "Magazine «.f the Week" 



\vk i:s hi \«. > i \n ii is 



SPONSOR; No.,.' 

( APS1 M CAS] HISTORY: To demonstrate the pull of 
1/ ll',l>\ wrestling matches, held every Thursday night at 
9:05 p.m.. Dennis James introduced a "mystery hold oj 
the week." it one point during the matches, the hold. 

instead («/ being described, is announced as the "mystery 

hold of the ii eel.." The first woman and man whose letters 

are received win a box «/ candy and a box of cigars, respec- 
tively. Over 1.000 letters uere received after the first 
"mystery hold" na\ announced 80% from women. 

w ABD, New 'i-.rk PROGRAM; "Wrestling Matches" 



•IOII WANTED 



SPONSOR: Russell Ireland 



M.I \< > : Placed dhect 



I APSULE < AS! HISTORY: Russell Ireland, advertising 
man from Duluth, Minnesota, came to Los ingeles to find 
a job. At first, hope was high he would find a fob on the 
"next' interview. The job never materialized, •>" he de- 
cided to use television to present himself to potential im- 
ployers. He purchased a I -minute spot at 7:29 p.m. and 
made an appeal, outlining his background. Numerous 
phone calls resulted, and Mr. Ireland accepted a position 
as advertising manager for a local firm. 

K'l'I.V. Los \ii"<-lr? I'KcMiKWI: I -minute announcement 



GLASSES 



SPONSOR : Schwabacher-Frey 



AGENCY : Placed direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Using a three-minute spot on 
KTLA's participating show, "Shopping at Home." 
Sc hwabacher-Frey, Los Angeles stationery and gift store. 
showed viewers magnifying glasses which teen' being sold 
at clearance. Prices ranged from under a dollar to $10. 
During the next few days over 100 uere sold. Also demon- 
strated uere various types of professional scissors. The 
next day 18 buttonhole scissors, $3 a pair, uere bought. 



KTLA, Los Angeles 



PROGRAM: "Shopping at Home'' 



AUTO REPAIRS 



SPONSOR CrisconiV AGENCY Yardis Advertising 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: When John P. Crisconi, 
President of the Philadelphia Motor Car Company (Olds- 
mobile dealer) decided to stress his repair and service de- 
partments rather than neu-car sales, he placed time on 
"Batter I p" a sports ipiiz II show. As a result, many 
automobile outlets have brought repair and service jobs to 
his shop some from outside the firm's immediate area. 
More than one has mentioned having beard of the company 
for thi' first time on the television show. 

WFIL-TV, Philadelphia PROGRAM: "Batter Up'. 



IMM. I OOO 



SPONSOR Nutrena Mills, Inc. AGENC1 Br 



It. Itr 



< APSULE CASE HISTORY: KSTP-T) sent out 500 ques- 
tionnaires to Twin City television set owners to determine 
product identification for one of its advertisers. Wutrena. 
It ithin seven days I Ii' replies uere received. Oj the 142 

replying, 121 indicated having seen and heard dog food 
commercials on KSTP-T) : I0(i knew the brand as 
\ulrenu: H had the wrong name (Purina. Champion, 
etc. I; 22 answered "no" or blank. Brand-name identifica- 
tion teas better than ~ V \ . 

KSTP-TV, Minneapolis PROGRAM Announcements 



4 



J*n its endeavor to bring Detroiters a diversity of entertainment, WWJ-TV, 
Michigan's first television station, has added weekly televised broadcasts of 
the Detroit Symphony Orchestra to its ever-growing list of program features. Compli- 
ments received from the thousands of television set owners in Detroit attest 
to WWJ-TV's perfection in technique during the first broadcasts of the Symphony. 
It marks another milestone in the progress of WWJ-TV, which, in its second 
year of operation, has already become an effective advertising 
medium in this multi-billion dollar market. 




FIRST IN MICHIGAN 



Ow„.d and Op.rat.J by THE DETROIT NEWS 



National Rtprtttnlalivts: THE GEORGE P. HOUINGBERY COMPANY 
ASSOCIATE AM-FM STATION WWJ 



mujj -w 



NSC Tmltvitnn Nrtvrork 



NOVEMBER 1948 



61 







A Service oj Radio Corporation of America 



YKS SIR, between summer and fall of I'MM. \\M. 
Television has doubled its weighl in advertisers 
— a bulging increase of more than ]()()'' in signed 
network sponsors. 

ITEM: man) ot the largest and most experienced ad- 
vertisers in the nation— like Procter & Gamble, Philco 
ami Colgate -Palmolive-Peet. They're spending more 
and more nione\ (new mone\ in addition to radio 
funds) on NBC Network Television shows. 

ITEM: television sponsors new to the medium recruits 
Irom printed media like Hates Fabrics, Bigelow-Sanford 
Carpets and Disney Hats. Disney, confident oi reaching 
.1 substantial part oi its market with television, now 



allocates the major part oi its advertising mone) there. 

ITEM: television him recordings to carr\ the message 
beyond the limits oi the present NBC Eastern Tele- 
vision Network until the da) when sight-and-sound 
will be linked directl) Irom coasl to coast. 

ITEM: today, more network sponsors than all other tele- 
vision networks combined — and Nl>(! all but sold out 
m the evening hours. 

^ es sir, it sure has grown — grown in wealth oi program 
material and versatilit) for viewers as it increases in 
proved sale-- effectiveness for advertisers. l'M.'l is the 
year for America's No. 1 Television Network. 








New NBC Television Network Sponsors 

Idmiral Corp. 
Hniis Fabrics, Inc. 
Bigelow-Sanford Carpet Co., Inc. 
Chevrolet Dealers 
Cluett-Peabody 
Colgate-Palmolive- Peel Co. 
Disney flats 
International Silver Co. 
Julius Kayser & Co. 
Phi I co Corp. 
Procter & Gamble Co. 
Sherwin II illiams Co. 
E. R. Squibb & Sons 
Stms/iine Biscuits, Inc. 
Sylvania Electric Products, Inc. 
Unique Art Manufacturing Co. 
Vick Chemical 
Walco Tele-vue Lens 
Whitehall I'harmaial Co. 



Continuing NBC Television Network Sponsors 

American Tobacco Co. 
Firestone Tire & Rubber Co. 
General Foods Corp. 
General Electric Co. 
Gillette Safety Razor Co. 
Gulf Oil Corp. 
Kraft Foods Co. 
Motorola. Inc. 
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. 
Swift & Co. 
The Texas Co. 



L. 











BMI/^- 



Hit Tunes for November 



Hi|| S Ranse) 
Eddy Arnold— Vic. 20-2806 



BOUQUET OF ROSES 

Dick Haymes— Dec. 24506 . 
R«x Turner— Varsity 8001 

CITY CALLED HEAVEN ^) 

Una Ma. Carlisle-BI. 11871 . Will B ' ad ^T C 6 °' 67 36897 
Barry Wood-Vic. 27589 . Les B'own-Okeh 6367 
Glen Gray-Dec. 69838 . Shep Fields— Bl. 11255 

COOL WATER (American) 

\ZlrL P^^rs-Dec. 46027, Vic 80-1 ,7 MjVfc . W-|076 
FoyWillinS— Maj. 6000 . Derry Falligant-MGM 1 0256 

CUANTO LE GUSTA <m 

Andrew, Sisters-CarmenMirand.-Dec. 24479 X.vi.r Crf-Col. 38239 

Eve Young— Vic. 20-3077 . Jack Smith— Cap. 1 5280 

DONT BE SO MEAN TO BABY 0^0 

Pes9y L««— Cap. 15159 . Duke Ellinston Col— 38295 



HAIR OF GOLD 



(Encore) 



(Mellin) 
U.MnnnicaU— Universal 1 21 . John Laurent— Mercury 5172 
Vack m E O :«"on-M.«o1on.2018 . Art L«"*-M6M 10858 
Gordon M.cR.«-Cap 15178 .Jack L.tro^-Vc. 20-3109 

I WANT TO CRY w^o 
IN MY DREAMS cm 

Vaughan Monroe— Vic. 20-3133 

LONESOME (Republic) 

Sammy Kaye— Vie. 20-3025 

PLAY THE PLAYERA 0*** 

P^o" V. U ,Va^v!c. 3 2 8 ? 8 1 8 045 . tZtttttf?** Li 9 M-MGM- 

RENDEZVOUS WITH A ROSE u^) 

Buddy Clark-Col. 38341 . Bob Eberly-Dec. 24491 

Pepper Ne.ly-Bull.t 1056 . Pied P.per-Cap . 1 5216 

Dick Wong— D ft D 45-1903 . Snooky Lanson— Merc. 5188 

TUNE ON THE TIP OF MT HEART, THE 

Sammy Kaye— Vic. 20-2746 

WALKIN' WITH MY SHADOW cw«*»*mo»w) 
WHEN YOU LEFT ME *«* 

Larry Green— Vic. 20-2049 . Russ Mor 9 an— Dec. 24503 

WHY DOES IT HAVE TO RAIN ON SUNDAY 

Freddy Martin-Vic. 20-2557 . Dennis Day-Vie. SO-2377 
Snooky Lanson-Mere. 5082 . Milt Herth Tno-Dec. 24388 
BealeSt. Boys— MGM 10141 

WITH A TWIST OF THE WRIST « 

Tony Pastor— Bl. 11022 . Kay Kyser— Col. 36075 

YOU STARTED SOMETHING bmd 

rXafiSMP- Korn^^-M^M^^'ld^d^MGM 10214 

YOU WALK BY **** 

Jerry W.yne-Bobby Byrne-Dec. 3613 . E<My Duehin-Col. 35903 
Chanoteers-Col. 36027 . Wayne King-V,e. 27206 

YOU WERE ONLY FOOLIN' Barron -Shap ,ro -Bernstein) 
Blue Barron-MGM 10185 . Ink Spots-Dec 24507 
Kay Starr-Cap. 15226 . Eric Wh,tely-Col. 38323 

*Soon to be released 



BROADCAST MUSIC INC. 

580 FIFTH AVENUE • NEW YORK 19, N. Y. 
NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD 



(Duchess) 



MR. SPONSOR ASKS 

(Continued from page 59) 

With the larger national advertisers 
there is little concern with the question 
at present. A company spending a 
million dollars for advertising and also 
spending heavily for sales promotion and 
merchandising can easily prorate the cost 
of store broadcasting among these three 
accounts in direct proportion to its ac- 
complishments for their product. 

With smaller companies store broad- 
casting often represents a larger outlay in 
comparison to the total budget and they 
will either make a special appropriation 
for it or charge it to all three budgets in 
proportion to their ability to absorb the 
cost or in proportion to what they guess 
to be the relative importance of the 
three activities. 

So perhaps the best way to summarize 
it all is to interject our point of view as the 
seller. The theoretical question of where 
to charge store broadcasting isn't nearly 
so important as the fact of trying it, to see 
how it works and determine the sort cf 
job it accomplishes. And when you see 
how well it does work, you can then sit 
down with your three managers and your 
accountant to reach a decision on how to 
split the cost — and it is our hunch that the 
decision very probably will be to set up a 
new account — Store Broadcasting. 

James L. Hyde Jr. 
Vp in Charge of Sale s 
Consumers Aid Inc. 
Chicago 



;,\ 



TV COMMERICAL 

(Continued from page 29) 

its punch. The type of film commercial 
used today in TV which can stand up 
under the greatest number of scannings 
and still retain major sales impact is the 
commercial whose pitch is based on 
public service. 

The current TV spot schedule of Stand- 
ard Oil illustrates this fact. Esso spots 
(about IS altogether) are rotated on a 
five-a-week schedule. Of them, those re- 
peated most with the least chance of 
creating adverse viewer reaction are those 
confined to billboarding; the rest of the 
commercial is straight public service. 
One Esso spot commercial was repeated 
daily for two weeks with good effects. 
The secret was simple. The one-minute 
film featured some really helpful pointers 
on highway safety. The selling value was 
there but listeners didn't realize it, and 
i raised Esso for its public-minded film. 
(Please turn to page 67) 

SPONSOR 



1. Biggest audience for every 
part of both day and night. 




NEW ORLEANS 

1st in the Deep South 

—Based on Latest 
Listener Diary Study!* 



2. Biggest audience for the 
week as a whole — -WWL 
wins by almost 3 to 1. 



3- Biggest percentage of wins 
in all quarter-hours — WWL 
wins 87%— 89.5% in day- 
time. 



4. Biggest net audience for 
strip programs. 



*Listener Diary Study made by Audi- 
ence Surveys, Inc. — from accurate cross 
section of the 559,970 families in the 94 
counties credited with 50°o or better, 
day and night coverage (BMB). Ask to 
see the complete survey; your Katz 
Agency representative has it. 



. . . and WWL's locally pro- 
duced shows win virtually as 
large shares-of-audience as 
CBS and transcribed pro- 
grams. 







This is definite proof folks turn to 




NEW ORLEANS 

A Department of Loyola University 
WWL . . . 50,000 watts — High-power, low-cost coverage of the Deep South — dominating this new-rich market 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY THE KATZ AGENCY, INC. 

NOVEMBER 1948 65 



LIVING HABITS 

(Continued from page 52) 

elusive with the Yoell organization, leads 
the respondent step by step through every 
minute action leading up to and then 
through use of a product. If, for example, 
a consumer tells the interviewer he eats 
chocolate bars because he "likes the 
taste," this non-definitive answer is fol- 
lowed up until the real meaning of 
"taste" emerges. 

Taste, Yoell discovered in a study for 
a national candy manufacturer, means 
infinitely more to a candy eater (or an 
eater of dry cereal, for that matter) than 
mere stimulation of taste buds. 



This advertiser had decided to abandon 
radio as unproductive when he called 
Yoell into the picture. He'd been adver- 
tising the tasty goodness of his candy. 
That didn't sell candy. 

He had conventional market statistics, 
but they told him nothing about why 
people eat candy. 

Camera Action studies revealed a major 
motivation in candy eating — the feeling 
that candy is a reward. Candy eating 
apparently is a minor celebration. This 
is true with both men and women, al- 
though the occasions which inspire or 
justify the reward are usually different. 
The roots of these feelings, as it's easy to 
see, are in childhood experiences. 




San Francisco* 
wervone's a Plutocr* 




MD ONE COLUMBIA STATION 



SERVES THEM ALL 




*Of the notion's 200 large?! cities, 
San Francisco is rirst in per capita 
net effective buying income. 
Source. SALES MANAGI 
Survey of buying Power dated 
May 10, iy43. 



oily hy U--I ».fy 1 Co l«< 



I., .1., A .„„l, u „lFo. 



J.l.o- 1,4 
. C. ',(„.. .. 



Eating candy for relaxation and ease of 
tension is another important candy buy- 
ing and eating motivation. The type and 
taste of the candy consumed is directly 
related to the reason for eating it. Party 
candies, for example, aren't the type a 
man would choose to eat during an after- 
noon break, or a woman desires during 
house-cleaning. This relationship be- 
tween the type of candy and its con- 
sumption has provided the sponsor with 
additional copy slants. 

Test radio campaigns by this manufac- 
turer using a "reward" theme have al- 
ready jumped sales substantially in test 
areas. 

A radio advertiser who makes dry 
cereals discovered from Camera Action 
investigations that taste was more im- 
portant to his prospects than his adver- 
tising emphasis had accounted for. A 
pilot survey isolated in the minds of 
cereal eaters such elements of taste as 
size, body, and texture of the cereal units, 
and indicated the lines a further quanti- 
tative study of taste appeals should 
follow. 

It is Yoell's belief derived from Camera 
Action studies that listeners do not 
ordinarily believe advertising claims that 
are outside their conscious experiences. 
The majority of people interviewed on 
their candy eating habits weren't aware 
of candy advertising claims, or didn't 
believe what they heard or read. 

In a study for Cecil and Presbrey, Inc., 
Yoell found that people generally don't 
believe tobacco advertising. (Cecil and 
Presbrey handles the Philip Morris 
cigarette daytime radio advertising.) 

More important, Yoell believes he 
found out why. It is his conclusion that 
people are incredulous because advertising 
claims are contrary to their personal ex- 
periences. The obvious corollary is that 
believable copy must be related to con- 
sumer experiences. There is ample evi- 
dence to prove the soundness of this 
approach. 

Since smokers' experiences create smok- 
ing motivations, Camera Action studies 
bring to light a number ol fundamental 
smoking satisfactions. No cigarette ad- 
vertising, claims Yoell, has ever carried 
out a consistent campaign appealing to 
these satislai tions 

To what, then, can cigarette advertising 
successes be attributed? Yoell gives two 
reasons. First, smoking has been on the 
increase for the past 25 years. Any and 
all ad-claims seemed to increase sales. It 
took time for people to apply objective 

(Please turn to page 74) 



66 



SPONSOR 



TV COMMERCIAL LIFE 

(Continued from page 64) 

Another approach to the problem of re- 
peating commercials in TV is found in the 
use of live and film time signals and 
weather spots. Although the faces of the 
Bulova, Elgin, Gruen, Longines, and 
other clocks seen in TV time signals 
don't change oftener than once every 
three or four months, the required element 
of freshness is there. This is because the 
time varies with every scanning, and 
listeners are more aware of the service 
factor of the commercial than the fact 
that they are being sold something. 

The same is true for weather signals. 
The well-known Botany lamb has gam- 
boled across thousands of TV screens in 
the past eight years, with only slight 
variations in the product-selling tech- 
niques. The change in the type of 
weather does the trick, and it is doubtful 
that the Botany spots would have lasted 
as long as they have with viewers if the 
emphasis were on selling alone. 

Many products are suited to neither a 
live commercial nor a filmed public- 
service approach. Any selling done for 
them on the visual air must be designed 
primarily to move products off store 
shelves. In such cases, TV research 
studies have shown that commercials 
tend to have one of two effects : ( 1 ) The 
interest in the commercial will be as high 
as or higher than the interest in the enter- 
tainment portion. (2) The interest will 
drop sharply, and go lower than any other 
portion of the program. 

There is virtually no "middle-of-the- 
road" approach to straight selling in TV. 
Either it's good, or it lays an egg when 
it's repeated. 

American Tobacco Company's famous 
square-dancing and marching cigarettes 
are a good example of the type of straight- 
selling TV commercial which can be re- 
peated man) - times. They fall into the 
"cute" class, but the stop-motion shorts, 
made by Jam Handy, are imaginative 
enough to catch the interest of viewers 
almost every time. ATC has made about 
ten such film commercials so far, for both 
spot and program usage, but even then 
the big tobacco firm takes no chances. 
New films are made from the old ones, by 
using the Jam Handy shorts with new 
sound tracks added, thus giving the effect 
of newness without having to spend the 
big money needed to create new clips. 

The limited-budget advertiser obvi- 
ously can't spend the kind of money 
American Tobacco does for ingenious film 
commercials. But some advertisers are 
I Please turn to page 70) 

NOVEMBER 1948 




His Touch System Keeps His Finger 
On Top of the News from Washington 

The "system" includes much more than an alert set of 
fingers on a typewriter. His office staff, complete with 
reporters and radio editors, works under constant |>i <•-- 
sure, sifting the news, confirming the facts, interviewing 
the people who know why news is made. P>\ the time 
he goes on the air, his 185-line script reflects precise 
background data gathered by trained reporters. 

The system pays off for listeners and advertisers as well. 
Hi* \ast and loyal national audience gets "the top of the 
news from Washington". His co-op advertiser.- gel re- 
sults. Currenth sponsored on 316 stations. Fulton Lewis, 
Jr. affords local advertisers network prestige at local time 
cost, with pro-rated talent cost. 

Since there are more than 500 \11?S stations, there may 
be an opening in your city. II you want a ready-made 
audience for a client (or yourself i. in\e-ligate now. 
(heck \our local Mutual outlet or the Co-operative 
Program Department. Mutual Broadcasting System, 
1440 Broadway, M C 1<"> i or Tribune Tower, Chicago 111. 



67 



signed and unsigned 



Advertising Agency Personnel Changes 



(Continued from page 19) 




SPONSOR 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 




Charles T. Clyne 
Reginald Cochlan 
I'hil Edwards 
Paul Forrest 
Kendal] Fost< r 
Ira Alan Goff 
Ralph Hart 
Hugh ll<> le 

El nn-r F. Jaspan 

Man Kent 

Major Waller R. Kim; 

Ben Libin 

Norman C. Lindqulst 
T. G. Maguire 
Dorothy McQueen 
James I). McTighe 
Mick] Oi inn 

( ,fin\ [eve S< ii uberl 
John I). Michel 
J. hn K Mortland 
Rudolph Montgelas 
Nam j Myers 
Roger Prj or 
William Sloan 
Richard W. Smith 
Gloria F. Sobelman 
Raj mond Spec tor 
Da\ id Straus III 
Erwin l>. Swann 
A. Knrir Todd 
Herbert True 
Charles P. Tyler 
Richard I'hl 
Dcedee Van Pulllam 
C. Frederic Volkert 
Brevoorl Walden 
Philip R. Warner 
John Wellington 
Charles I!. West 
Paul M. Winship 
Glenn Wiggins 
Sanford F. Wolln 



Blow, N. Y., acct exec 

Ruthrauff & Ryan, N. Y. 

Carl Byoir, N. V.. radio, TV dir 

Dan 15. Miner. 1.. A., acct exec, radio dir 

William Kstv. V V. pub rel dir 

Scott & Williams. \. V. 

Spitzer & Mills. Toronto, asst radio dir 

Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, V Y.. superv o 

com mi radio prodn 
McGeehan & O'Mara, N. Y., acct exec 

I S. Army (Public Information div). Wash. 

chief of liaison branch 
WW DC. Wash. 

All-Canada Radio Facilities, Montreal 

Olmsted & Foley, Mnpls.. radio dir 

Badger & Browning & Mersey. N. V. 

Campbell-Mithun, Mnpls.. vp 

Buchanan. \. Y.. vp 

John II. Riordan, L. A., media dept 

K\\. H'wood., producer 
Griswold-Eshleman, Cleveland, sr acct exec 
Shaw-Shon. N. Y., research dir. acct exec 
Raymond Spector. N. Y., pres (discontinued) 

Biow, N. Y.. acct exec 

Richard Jorgensen, San Jose Calif., acct exec 

Watts-Payne, Tulsa Okla., radio dir 

Biow, ,N. Y.. acct exec 

Sullivan. Stauffer. Colwell & Bavles, H'wood. 

CBS. H'wood. 

Hevenor, Albany N. Y. 

I'latt-Forbes. N. Y. 

Bermingham, Castleman & Pierce, N. Y. 

Ruthrauff & Ryan. N. Y. 

Neal I). Ivey. Phila. 

Merrill-Anderson. N. Y., acct exec 

Kenyon o< Eckhardt, N. Y., acct exec 

Reporter Publications. V Y. 



New Agency Appointments 



Same, vp 

Bauerkin, New Orleans. \p 

W. B. Doner. Chi., radio. IV dir 

W. B. Geissinger, I.. A., radio. TV dir 

Same. TV dir 

Rodgers & Brown. N. Y.. acct exec, radio. TV dir 

Same, radio dir 

Brooke. Smith. French & Dorrance. Detroit, radio. T\ dir 

Broomfield-I'odmore. Trenton N. .1.. radio. TV dir 
Biow, N. V.. in chge prodn radio commls 
Gardner, St. L.. work on Army recruiting acct 

Bert M. Sara/.an. Wash., radio. TV dir 
Malcolm- Howard, Chi.. TV dir 
Erwin Wasey. Montreal, radio dir 
Harold F. Stanfield. Montreal, radio dir 
Same, assoc partner 
Schank, N. V.. media dir 
led Bates, N. V.. timebuyer 
Weiss & Geller, Chi.. TV dir 
Olmsted & Foley, Mnpls.. assoc partner 
Same, pres 

I.eo Burnette, I.. A., media head 
Foote, Cone & lidding, N. V.. TV dir 
Roy S. Durstine, I.. A., radio. TV dir 
Same. Louisville Ky.. mgr 

Kopeland, Silver Springs Md., radio copy writer 
Raymond Spector (new), N. Y.. pres 
A. W. Lewin, V Y.. radio. TV dir 
Same, vp 

Todd, Podesta. San Jose Calif., partner 
Carter, Kansas City, radio. TV dir 
Same, vp 

Same. N. Y.. head TV activity 
Kamin. Houston, radio dir 
McCarty, Pittsb., acct exec 
Federal. N. Y'.. acct exec 

Needham & Grohmann, N. Y'., vp, acct exec- 
Young & Rubicam, N. Y.. radio, TV dir 
Paul Smith, media dir 
Doremus, N. Y., acct exec 
Same, vp 
Edwin Parkin. N. Y.. acct exec, radio. TV dir 




SPONSOR 



PRODUCT (or service) 



AGENCY 



; 



1 



W: 



Atlantic Syrup Refining Co Inc. Phila. 

Block Drug Co, Jersey City N. J, 

M J Breltenbach Co. N. Y. 

( lolonial Airlines. N. Y. 

C\ A Corp. S. E. 

Eastern Tobacco Co, Wilmington Del. 

I i lipse Sleep Products Inc. N. Y. 
Fleming-Hall Tobacco Co In. , N V 

Gadget-of-the-Month Club, L, A 

Gunther Brewing Co, Balto. 

I loreni e Lustig 

Madwed Mfg Co, Brldgepon Conn. 

Metal I ile Products Inc. Hastings Mich 

New Holland Mai bine Co, New Holland Pa. 
Peerless Pen & Pencil Co. N. Y 

I'l.isi ikon w estern, s. E. 

Quakei Citj Chocolate K Confectioner) Co, Phila. 

Reynolds Metals Co. Chi 

Salad Products Corp, Clinton Iowa 
kail Seller & Sons. Phila. 

Southwest Airways Co, S. F, 
sw it/er*s I Icorice Co, St I.. 
I >\ I.. i \u tomobile < io, I.. \. 
Third Army llil(|trs. Atlanta 

i , .. I ooda Newark V j. 

Venus Beauty Stylists, Berkeley Calif. 

Vineland Poultry Labs, Vineland N. I 

w alsh Labs inc. Chi, 

Hornet l Williamson inc. Indianapolis 

William Wrlglej .It < Eld. Toronto 



Quaker Maid Syrup 

Mltilpoo Dry Shampoo 

Pepto-Mangan 

Air travel 

Cresta Blanca Wine 

Tobacco 

Springs, bedding 

Sano cigarettes, cigars, pipe tobacco . . 
Gadgets 

Gunther Premium Dry Eager 
Women's specially store. . 
Karen Dial-o-matic Cookers 
Alumitile 
Farm machinery 
Pens, pencils 
I neck 

Good and Plenty. So Big candy bars 
Lifetime Stainless Steel Household 

( lookware 
Lettuce Leaf. Olive-Infused Salad. 

Cooking oil 
Meal packer 
Air travel 
Candy 
Automobiles 

Army. Air Force recruiting 
Foods 
w omen's Intimate apparel 

Poultry vaccines 

Rodan rat killer 

Candy 

< Jicw Ing gu in 



J. Robert Mendle. Phila. 
Harry B. Cohen. N. Y. 
Small & Seiffer. N. Y. 
Seidel. N \ 

McCann-Erickson. S. F. 
I ,evj Newark N. J. 
Henry J. Kaufman. Wash 
Deutsch iS, Shea. N. \ 
Ruthrauff & Ryan, H'wood. 
Ruthrauff & Ryan, V Y. 
Bobley, V Y. 

Market Research anil Advertising, N. Y'. 

I imlsav . New Haven Conn. 
J. Waller Thompson. N. Y. 
Eelaiul K. Howe. N. Y. 
Benson M. Sherman. S. E. 
Adrian Bauer. Phila. 

James Thomas Chirurg. Boston 

Maxon. N. Y. 
( dements, Phila. 
West -Marquis, S. E. 
Kane. Bloomington III. 
I oikwood-Shackelford. E. A. 
Tucker Wayne. Atlanta 
lew Newark N. J. 
Ad Fried, Oakland Calif. 
Eee Ramsilell. Phila 

C. C. Fogarty, Chi. 

Bo/ell Kc Jacobs. Indianapolis 

Walsh. Toronto 



ur.i k. io is 




■M 



f \ f JJ pi / p sails into new markets fast 



with 

SPOT 



In the highly competitive soap 
business, it takes fast, powerful selling 
to launch new products with a 
flying start. So it's natural that Lever 
Brothers uses plenty of Spot Radio to 
introduce its new detergent, BREEZE. 

Starting with the nation's hard-water areas, 
BREEZE has expanded market by market, 
using Spot Radio to hammer home powerful sales 
messages. Spot Radio starts working for Lever 
Brothers well before announcements are 
aired . . . through pre-campaign merchandising 
of schedules that insures aggressive market-wide 
retail support. Dealers know this potent 
medium will bring in customers, and they prepare 
to welcome them with stocks, displays and 
promotions. As a result. Lever Brothers 
attains profitable volume fast . . . 
and then maintains it with continuing 
BREEZE Spot Radio campaigns. 

Whether you have a new product to establish, 
or an old one that needs new sales, Spot 
Radio can do the job. Find out about this 
powerful, flexible medium — how it 
works and how to work it — from your 
John Blair man. He knows! 



RADIO! 





JOHN 
BLAIR 




V COMPANY 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES OF LEADII 
RADIO AND TELEVISION STATIONS 



BREEZE advertising is handled 
by Federal Advertising Agency, 
New York, New York 



'Spot Broadcasting is radio advertising 
of any type ( from brief announcements to 
full- hour programs) planned and placed on 
a flexible market-by-market basis. 



Offices in Chicago • New York • Detroit • St. Louis • Los Angeles • San Francisco 



NOVEMBER 1948 



69 



NOW! 



5000 

WATTS 

KHMO 

HANNIBAL 

COVERING THE 
HANNIBAL-OUINCY 
TRI-STATE 
MARKET 



ni ««»mi. 



42> COUNTIES OF 

prosperous ftarkTwain Land 

ILLINOIS • IOWA • MISSOURI 
NATIONAL REP. — JOHN E. PEARSON CO. 



oiee> 



Mutwc£j/atu^<nk 



1070 KC 

' i i i i 1 1 1 i i i . ■ 



■ STATE ARIA 
IOOO WATTS mi NITC 




*S*m 



Black's Poultry Company bought 63 stations 
including WDNC, the 5000 watts— 620 kc 
CBS station in Durham, N.C. Results? WDNC 
hatched a lower per inquiry cost than all oth- 
er 63 stations except one! 

What do you want to sell more 
of at lower cost? 




DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 



The Herald-Sun Station 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Rep. Paul H. Raymer 



TV COMMERCIAL LIFE 

( 'ontinuedfrom page 67 > 

doing well with low-budget TV commer- 
cials which are repeated several times a 
week, or oftener. 

Pioneer Scientific Corporation, makers 
of Polaroid Television Filters, has sold 
over 100,000 of them to date, mainly 
through two one-minute films used in 17 
TV markets and on their portion of 
NBC's Howdy Doody. The Polaroid 
films are the simplest kind of straight 
product demonstration, featuring a prod- 
uct which can be sold best by this 
method. There are no frills or coy selling 
techniques which the audience will tire of 
seeing. Each of the films gets an every- 
other-week repeat on. Howdy Doody, but 
there it is integrated into a live commer- 
cial featuring Howdy and Bob Smith, and 
keyed in with a give-away premium. 

It's another example of a TV commer- 
cial that can stand up under repetition. 
If the commercial is unim?ginative to 
begin with, no amount of repeating will 
make it sell a product. * * * 



RELIGION 

(Continued from page 41) 

About two minutes are devoted to an 
inspirational message. The last 30 sec- 
onds allow the individual stations to cut 
in with a message from a local clergyman. 

The inspirational message takes its 
theme from the play just heard by the 
audience. In the first broadcast of the 
series, of Cyrano de Bergerac, Cyrano's 
long, self-denying love for Roxanne was 
pointed out. It was observed that 
Cyrano rose to great heights of char- 
acter, and that he did it not by crying 
out against his physical ugliness nor 
by turning his wit to destroying the 
marriage of Christian and Roxanne, but 
by making something of himself. This 
was followed by a reasoned appeal that 
each man's battle with himself is not 
easy, but is easier il lie has encourage- 
ment and help. The message further 
suggested that the listener's own chinch 
could help him. If he was not a member 
of any church, it was suggested that he 
try the Episcopal Church. A booklet. 
Finding Vino- Way, was offered to those 
interested in finding out something about 
the Episcopal Church. There was no 
doctrinal slant in the message. 

The cut-in by the local clergyman 
localizes the Church's message. It con- 
sists of a 1 5- to 30-second announcement 
in which the Episcopal clergyman in the 
area covered by each station introduces 
himself, welcomes listeners to further 



broadcasts, and extends an invitation to 
the next Sunday morning service. This 
cut-in is not feasible in large cities with 
metropolitan audiences, but is confined 
to these localities served by one or two 
churches. 

No Protestant denomination has ever 
before embarked upon a dramatic broad- 
cast series. The Episcopal Church is 
sponsoring this series because it considers 
that an effective radio program can 
strengthen and enlarge its membership. 
It expects to have within a short time a 
listening audience of 10,000,000 people — 
five times its present membership. It can 
also hope, by reason of turn-over audi- 
ence, to reach a good portion of the 70,- 
000,000 people in the United States who 
are not a part of any church. 

The philosophy behind the series rests 
squarely on the conviction that the 
church is not to be brought to the 
people, the people are to be brought into 
the church. How effective the series will 
be remains to be seen. 

The Christian Science Church is 
another user of commercial time on the 
radio. It confines its major effort to a 
15-minute transcribed program called 
The Healing Ministry of Christian Science. 
This program is made up in part of read- 
ings from the Bible with correlative 
passages from Science and Health with 
Key to the Scriptures by Mary Baker 
Eddy, the discoverer and founder of 
Christian Science. The program also 
includes the reading of a verified testi- 
mony of healing from one of the Christian 
Science periodicals, Christian Science 
Sentinel or Christian Science Journal. 
This program is carried on 105 stations of 
the Mutual network, plus 424 unaffiliated 
stations. The Mutual program is piped 
out of New York, Chicago, Salt Lake 
City, and Los Angeles on Saturdays at 
4:45 p.m., local time. The stations air 
the program once a week, at times ad- 
justed to local conditions. Starting 1 Jan- 
uary 1949 the transcribed program will go 
over the full Mutual network of about 
500 stations. The addition of some two 
to three hundred unaffiliated stations will 
bring the number of stations airing the 
program to somewhere between seven 
and eight hundred. 

Though the Christian Science Church 
receives free time on main stations 
\\ Ml. Boston ; KFI, Los Angeles; WIBC, 
Indianapolis; WJJD, Chicago; to men- 
tion a few), the Church is ready and 
willing to pay for its time. It believes 
that it contributes to the welfare of the 
station and the community thereby. 
The Christian Science programs are paid 
Phase turn to page 72) 



70 



SPONSOR 




T O 



RADIO STATIONS 



WITHIN the past few days, every radio station 
in the United States, Canada, Alaska, Puerto 
Rico, I law. in, the Philippines, the Canal Zone, 
Australia, ami New Zealand has been delivered 
a prospectus outlining the operation ol the 
COOP1 RATIV] PROGRAM SYNDK \ 
1K)\ PI \\ 

( ( )\( I I \ I I ) by, and ni >w l>i ing operated 
lor. stations themselves, this Plan— the stations' 
own— offers each subscriber a potential in 
excess ni $20,000 worth of network quality 
programs per week lor not in excess ol his 
national, one tune, class-A, quarter-hour rate 
per week. 

IIIXDS subscribed by the over 100 initial sub- 
scribers already guarantee delivery of at least 



three program series per week to ever) sub- 
scriber . . . each <>l tin calibre ol tin' first— the 
live quarter hour "PAT O'BRIEN FROM 
1\S||)| HOLLYWOOD" series, set lor 
December 15th release. As additional sub- 
scribers are added, tin fourth, fifth, and 
succeeding serjes will be produced. 

MM to-date response- to the Plan has been 
immediate and enthusiastic. 879i ol the' sta- 
tions initially interviewed . . . subscribed! Since- 
delivery ol the' prospectus, station subscriptions 
have mounted rapidly. 

STATIONS are- invited to participate whei 
evei the exclusive' has not already been taken. 

lo aei|uiu- exclusive broadcast rights in your 
primary area, phone, write, wire immediately. 



BRUCE EELLS & ASSOC IATES 

2 2 17 Mara villa Drive • Hollywood 28, California 
Pli one : II Ol 1 v h ood 



.;.- 




just a few oj the typical markets and nations ahead} subscribed: 



WRR, Dallas 

koma, Oklahoma City 

WD5U, New Orleans 
W5AI, Cincinnati 
KFDA, Amarillo 
WAPi, Birmingham 



wkgn, Knoxville 
WRNl, Richmond 
KROC, Rochester 
kfjz, Fort Worth 

WCON, Atlanta 
wfbm, Indianapolis 



wfdf, I lint 

KABC, S.m \n: mi 
KIOA, Des Monies 

kbmy, Billings 

KVET, Austin 

ksjb, Jamestown 



kuta, Sail I ake ( it) 
wknx, Saginaw 
KXYZ, Houston 
KGHF, Pueblo 
KPOW, Powell 

cfcn, Calgary 



koin, Portland 
KFBC, Cheyenne 
KLIX, Twin Falls 
CFRN, Edmonton 
kjr, Seattle 
CJOB, Winnipeg 



NOVEMBER 1948 



71 



RELIGION 

Continued from page 70) 

for by the voluntary contributions of 
the members. Envelopes marked "Radii • 
Fund" are always found in the pew 
racks. 

The transcribed Christian Science pn> 
grams are aired to bring the message of 
the healing ministry of Christian Science 
to the radio audience. These programs aie 
not broadcast during church service 
hours, for the Christian Science Church 
has found that programs broadcast during 
Sunday worship hours encourage church- 



goers to neglect regular attendance. 
Branch Christian Science churches do, 
however, sometimes sponsor local Sunday 
service broadcasts once or twice a month. 
The Church wants church-going. It be- 
lieves that only spiritual consecration on 
the part of each individual can keep the 
nation safe from the perils which lie 
ahead. 

More extraordinary from a religious 
broadcasting standpoint is the Christian 
Science Monitor program The Christian 
Science Monitor Views the News, which 
is broadcast at 9:30 p.m. each Tuesday 
night, Coast'to'Coast, on some 70'odd 
ABC network stations. This 15-minute 




ersistence . . . 



is a most valuable asset. Men who hare 
and use this quality always get some- 
where. • Nothing else in the world ean 
take the place of persistence. • Talent 
nill not: nothing is more common than 
unsuccessful men with talent. • Genius 
trill not: unrewarded genius is almost a 
proverb. • Education trill not; the world 
is full of educated derelicts. • Per- 
sistence and determination alone are the 
omnipotent. • Through persistence R MAC, 

established in 1926, trill soon iio to 
.').<)<)<) ualts. unlimited, al 630, with an 

audience oj one and one-<jiiarter million. 

Mutual in San intonio 



M\.mac -lV/ 

Howard II . Davis, owner 

Represented Nationally by 
THE JOHN E. PEARSON COMPANY 



ss 



< 



-■VVVVVVV-v^N'-v-V^ 



analysis of the news by Erwin D. Can- 
ham. Editor of The Christian Science 
Monitor, Rhodes Scholar, President of 
the American Society of Newspaper 
Editors, member of the American Dele- 
gation to the United Nations Conference 
on Freedom of Information, is often as 
entertaining as it is informative. Mr. 
Canham draws upon the Monitor's far' 
flung correspondents who pour into Boston 
a steady stream of news which is carefully 
sifted and edited. He supplements, 
analyzes, and interprets these dispatches, 
drawing upon his 20 years of experience 
in international journalism. The Mon- 
itor's editor has many "informal" sources 
as a result of frequent interviews with 
national and world leaders during his 
man) 1 "reconnaissance" trips abroad. 

The Christian Science Monitor has a 
highly loyal following not limited to 
church members. An international daily 
newspaper, it is highly respected through- 
out the world. It is an editor's paper, 
subscribed to by more editors than is any 
other newspaper, and rated one of the 
leading newspapers in the world by many 
students of journalism. It is so esteemed 
for its unbiased treatment of the news 
that when only the four press associa- 
tions are allowed representation at a 
press conference, The Christian Science 
Monitor is frequently the only independ- 
ent newspaper represented. 

Why does The Christian Scieyice Mon- 
itor broadcast? Basically, to present the 
radio audience with a reasonable, un- 
biased interpretation of the news and as 
a corollary, to manifest, by works, 
Christian Science's influence for good. 
The program pays off in subscriptions, 
too — over 600 subscriptions are received 
each week. 

The Family Theater, brain-child of hus- 
tling, 38-year-old Roman Catholic priest 
Father Patrick Peyton, is, like the Protes- 
tant Episcopal show, dramatic. It fea- 
tures on Mutual Wednesdays (9-9:55 
p.m., EST) either an original play or a 
Broadway or Hollywood adaptation. 
When it first went on the air the plays 
were dull, heavily moral, but as time 
went on and funds came in the scripts 
grew defter, until today the program is 
uniformly listenable theater. (Stolen 
Symphony, a radio original, won the 
1948 Ohio State University Institute of 
Education b) Radio Award for religious 
broadcasts over networks.) 

The program gets its time from Mutual 
free, provided that Father Peyton as- 
sumes financial responsibility for all 
other costs; that every program features 
a big-name star; and that the program be 
(Please turn to page 101) 



72 



SPONSOR 



CP 







NOVEMBER 1948 



73 



ALL 

ATLANTA 

LISTENS 




As Lockwood Doty 
Edits The News 

Twice daily, every week day, 
Lockwood Doty presents news 
events in concise and pungent 
style to one of the South's largest 
radio audiences. Atlantans prefer 
these^ news programs for their 
clarity, fairness and completeness. 
Sponsors have found them pro- 
ductive of extra sales. 

Lane-Rexall is Doty's sponsor 
12:30 to 12:45 P.M. The period 
from 6:30 to 6:45 P.M. will be- 
come available shortly because 
of seasonal change in that spon- 
sor's advertising. For a 
top rated, result produc- 
ing news program we 
suggest you contact the 
Headley-Reed Company 
for complete details on 
Lockwood Doty NOW! 




ABC 



IN ATLANTA IT'S 

WCON 

THE ATLANTA CONSTITUTION 

STATION 
5000 WATTS 550 KC 



LIVING HABITS 

(Continued from page 66) 

evidence to claims. Second, other adver- 
tising forces, such as association, repeti- 
tion, etc., have their own influence. 

Claims buttressed by medical men or 
groups were a powerful stimulus at first, 
also, because of the belief, ingrained from 
childhood, that smoking is harmful to 
health. There was, for example, an 
initially favorable reaction to the claim 
"this cigarette is less irritating because 
. . ." But as time went on and objective 
evidence of it was not forthcoming, results 
became weaker and weaker. So the 
Raleigh medical-based campaign (Brown 
& Williamson switched agencies because 
of negative sales trend) hasn't yet in- 
creased B. & W. business. 

Among the basic satisfactions Camera 
Action studies brought to light were 
cigarette smoking as a crutch to ease 
situations and relieve tensions, as a 
breather, and as a reward — this time with 
a different quality than a candy reward. 

An amazing conclusion is that there are 
only two or three cigarettes in a pack that 
are smoked primarily for pleasure. 

The remaining 17 cigarettes (and 
others) are smoked for different reasons. 
Some of them are smoked because they 
are mentally associated with pleasurable 
things, or circumstances. 

As a whole, smokers are by no means 
wedded to a brand. As might be ex- 
pected, however, Camera Action probing 
revealed that the younger age group of 
smokers switch most often and most 
easily, and that one of the reasons is their 
desire to conform (with hust>and, sweet- 
heart, "gang," etc.). 

The principal agency on the Philip 
Morris account is the Biow Company, 
Inc., who created and have been plugging 
with great success the "no cigarette 
hangover" theme. The success of this 
appeal seems to illustrate in part the 
working of Weber's (psychological) law 
that the greater the intensity of the 
original stimulus, the greater must be the 
in< rease in stimulus to cause a perceptible 
difference in the resulting reaction. 

Smokers, in other words, have heard so 
many medical, oi near-medical, claims it 
takes a "shocker" to get a desired re- 
action. The cigarette hangover theme 
seems to provide that shocker. 

Cecil and Presbrey sold Philip Morris 
on using daytime radio to reach women 
smokers via daily 15-minute segments of 
the Mutual packages Heart's Desire* and 
Queen for a Day. The agency, however, 
is required to create their commercials 

* %../ currenllyfypontored by Philip Morris. 



within the framework of the "no hang- 
over" theme. 

Another kind of data from Yoell's sur- 
vey, however, provides an advertising 
technique which takes advantage of 
specific experiences without regard to 
copy content. Analysis of reasons for 
brand switching reveals the important 
influence of word of mouth discussions 
about the relative merits of brands. 

Astute David G. Lyon (son of Philip 
Morris president Alfred E. Lyon), a Cecil 
and Presbrey vice president, conceived 
the idea of adapting this fact to his ail 
selling. 

The appeal is to women. So, instead of 
having one or more commercial an- 
nouncers make the pitch, Lyon selects 
ahead of time a woman Philip Moiris 
smoker from the audience. She goes over 
with the announcer before the broadcast 
her experience as a Philip Morris smoker. 
There is no set script. The observations, 
of course, are concerned with the "hang- 
over" theme. 

About half the commercial time is 
taken up first with identifying the woman 
in such a way as to establish her in the 
feeling of listeners as a real person one of 
themselves. Then with the announcer 
leading they talk ad lib about Philip 
Morris cigarettes and how she started 
smoking them. If she's timid and stam- 
mers a little, so much the better! 

Lyon started this approach about six 
months ago. The sponsor identification 
rating on Queen for a Day leaped 25' ; on 
the first check (less than 12 broadcasts 
later) following use of the new technique. 

Knowing the living habits of prospects 
can result in more than turning prospects 
into customers — properly employed it can 
be used to turn prospects into permanent 
customers. * * * 



NORWICH PHARMACAL 

(Continued from page 39) 

Radio programing got another try from 
Norwich in 1940, when they decided to 
bolster their sales in New England (for a 
long time a region where Norwich sales 
were spotty). Their show, a low-cost 
audience participation program called 
What Bums You Up, brought no immedi- 
ate results in the 18 weeks that it ran on 
Yankee Network. What Burns You Up 
fizzled out quietly. Norwich decided 
then that radio was probably a bad bet 
for them. When the show was becoming 
just another memory to Norwich, they 
became aware of a startling fact. 

About three months after What Burns 
(Please turn to page 78) 



74 



SPONSOR 



N 



KGO 



B-2L. 





#'"&£, 











puts more power 
in your sales message! 



KGO's new 50,000-watt output gives 
your radio advertising more power 
where it does the most good — where 
the most people live and listen. Nearly 
70% of all Northern California's radio 
homes are in the Metropolitan Bay 
Area. KGO, with its increased power 
and directional antenna, saturates this 
area with a signal equal to that of a 
100,000-watt transmitter! Directional 
transmission avoids waste over the 
Pacific Ocean and the Sierra moun- 
tains. It focuses your message right 
on the people you want to talk to. 



But besides adding power in the 
big-market section, KGO's new 
strength multiplies its coverage. Now 
its area of dominant signal strength 
is three times larger than ever before. 
And mail responses to nighttime pro- 
grams come in from fantastic dis- 
tances — as far away as Alaska! Let- 
ters prove a listenable signal in seven 
Western states and part of Canada, 
in addition to 5] of California's 58 
counties. When your advertising 
message rides that signal, it's going 
places! 



Your sales story can find a big, ready-made 
audience on one of these popular programs: 



1. Michael Shayne 10:15 pm Mondays. Fast 
action, thrills, drama, seasoned with humor. 
Scripted by Larry Marcus, whom critics call 
one of the best in the mystery business. Follows 
Richfield Reporter. 

2. Philo Vance 10:1 5 pm Thursdays. S.S. Van 
Dyne's urbane crime-solver, with his old com- 
panions District Attorney Markham and Ser- 
geant Heath, is proving one of radio's most 
popular sleuths. Follows Richfield Reporter. 



3. Elmer Davis 6:15 pm Tuesday through 
Friday. Calm, dispassionate analysis of the 
news by one of the most respected reporters 
on the air. A co-op program at local rates 
with all the prestige of a full network show. 

4. ABC Home Digest 6:30 am weekdays. 
John Harvey, veteran showman and story- 
teller, conducts this new KGO participating 
show. It's tailored for full family listening and 
soaring mail returns show its growing populari t v. 



ABC 



Call the ABC spot sales office nearest you for information about any 
or all of these stations: 

WJZ — New York 50,000 watts 770 kc KEC A — Los Angeles 5,000 watts 790 kc 

WENR - Chicago 50,000 watts 890 kc WXYZ — Detroit 5,000 watts 1270 kc 

KGO — San Francisco 50,000 watts 810 kc WMAL — Washington 5,000 watts 630 kc 

ABC Pacific Network 



American .Broadcasting Company 



! 



NOVEMBER 1948 



75 




trends 




Based upon the number of programs and an- 
nouncements placed by sponsors on TV sta- 
tions and indexed by Rorabaugh Report on 
Television Advertising. Business placed for 
month of July 1948 is used for each base 



TV business placement, which dropped during August, bounded 
back during September in all categories. Greatest business increase 
was in the local-retail over-all category which was up 18.9 from 
August. Increases were noted in total business placement as well as 
in business placed in sponsor's 10-city constant base. Constant 
base areas show a much slower upward trend than do the total busi- 
ness due to more and more cities adding stations. Food and Radio, 
TV and Appliances together place 47.6% of all network business. 
Tobacco and Jewelry place 53.3% of all national and regional selective 
TV. Automotive and Radio, TV, and Appliances placed 61.2 of all 
local-retail telecasting. 



BREAKDOWN OF TV BUSINESS BY CATEGORIES 



CATEGORY I JUNE I JULY I AUG I SEPT OCT NOV DEC 



FEB MAR APR 



TOTAL" AND TEN-CITY TRENDS 



JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC JAN FEI MAR APR i MAY 




NATIONAL ft REGIONAL SELECTIVE 



LOCAL RETAIL 



100.0 || o 



111.2 




Gray area: total units of business. 
Base month: July = 100.0% 



Black area: constant base 
ol 10 cities, IS stations 



NATIONAL ft REGIONAL SELECTIVE 



110 




Gray area: total units of business. 
Base month: July = 100.0 % 



Black area: constant base 
of 10 cities, 19 stations 



1380 



119.1 




LOCAL RETAIL 



Gray area: total units ol business. 
Base monlh: July = 100.0 % 



Black area: constant base 
ol 10 cities. 19 stations 




CALIFORNIA 




NOW, — for the first time — all the salient facts about television in Southern 
California have been assembled in one study. 

In September KFI -TV commissioned a leading Western research organization to find 
answers for such questions as "Just how many sets does Los Angeles have?" 
and "What's the tune-in?". Here are some of the highlights of that report: 



SET OWNERSHIP: Approximately 28,400 
as of September 1. Of these about 10% 
are installed in public places, the 
remainder in homes. 



SETS IN USE: About two-thirds of all sets 
are in use during the average evening 
quarter-hour. Nearly 9 in 10 Southern 
California set owners who are at home 
use their sets some time during the 
evening. 



AVERAGE VIEWERS PER SET: About 3.5 
persons. 



These and many other important facts about TVaudience 
and what's going on in the Southern California TV pic- 
ture are contained in a presentation, "The TV Picture in 
Southern California." We will be happy to show it to you. 

KFI-TV is the blood brother of KFI, Southern California's ranking 
station with listeners and advertisers for a quarter-century. 

With its own complete and separate staff of TV experts, its all-new 
RCA equipment, KFI-TV has established new highs in picture clarity 
and entertainment during three months of experimental operation. 

Now, KFI-TV is operating commercially five nights a week. 
Discriminating Southern California advertisers like Union Oil, 
Hoffman Radio, and Packard Bell have selected KFI-TV as the 
station on which to invest their program budget. 

KFI-TV is squarely in the middle of Southern California's television 
picture — the best place to focus your television budget. 





Represented nationally by 
Edward Petry and Co., Inc. 




NOVEMBER 1948 



77 



NORWICH PHARMACAL 

(Continued from page 74 

You Up left the air, Norwich salesmen 
began to report that buying on the air- 
sold product, Unguentine, was climbing. 
What's more, the buying was traceable to 
the show. Six months after the show's 
demise, sales in the spotty New England 
areas were at their highest point in years. 
As Norwich puzzled over the news, they 
realized then that overnight results for 
their line of drug products were im- 
possible in radio. But, the right program 
might well bring in sales results ... if it 
ran long enough. 



Then the war came, and Norwich, up 
to their ears in war work for the Army and 
Navy Medical Departments, forgot about 
network programing for awhile. For a 
brief run in 1943, they sponsored a cap- 
sule musical show, the 5-minute Grace 
Morgan Sings, on WJZ, New York. 
W hen the star of the show died suddenly, 
the time slot was dropped, and radio went 
back into the "future" file. 

The war years passed. Norwich net 
sales had jumped tremendously from the 
prewar level, from a 1936 1940 average of 
$4,500,000 a year, to their wartime peak 
ot more than $12,000,000 in 1943. When 
the first big cut-backs in military spending 



f» 



Oh uhut beautiful 

er en in us for sponsors" 




CINCI 
first uuuin ... 

%t DURING EVENING HOURS 



n 



ATI 



SETS 
IN USE 


NET STA. 

"B" 


WCPO 


NET STA. 
"C" 


STATION 
"D" 


NET STA. 

"E" 


26.1 


18.8 


32.9 


20.0 


n.9 


12.3 



lit DURING MORNING HOURS 



16.2 


14.6 


26.6 


25.5 


14.6 


16.6 



lit IN TOTAL RATED TIME PERIODS 



J3 



Jl 



First According to August C. E. HOOPER ratings in Cincinnati, Ohio 



20.8 


16.3 | 29.6 


25.3 


13.9 


11.8 




Represented 

by 

The BRANHAM 
CO. 



78 



were felt, the net sales tapered down to 
$10,000,000 a year. Norwich started 
looking again to the consumer market. 
Their sales leader, Pepto-Bismol, had 
done well during the war years, and had 
increased 331 C ( in sales from the 1942 
level. It looked like the most promising 
item to promote. 

Meanwhile, the American Broadcasting 
Company was engaged in its own postwar 
plans. With the first faint streaks of a 
dawning buyer's market, ABC announced 
a block of four new programs designed to 
lure in business. ABC premiered the 
block- The Fat Man, I Deal in Crime, 
Forever Tops, and Jimmy Gleason's Diner 
— en 21 January 1946. Of the four shows, 
only Fat Man proved itself a success as a 
sustainer. 

Fat Man was a modestly-priced ($4,500) 
mystery, and the only one which was 
something new in radio. There had been 
radio series about "private eyes" often 
enough before, but E. J. Rosenberg, pro- 
ducer of Fat Man. had built the character 
from the ground up. The principal char- 
acter is a tough, fat, drawling detective 
who is the opposite of the Thin Man, 
already well-established as a radio version 
of Dashiell Hammett's suave detective 
couple. The Fat Mari was a radio natural. 
The actor who portrays him (J. Scott 
Smart) looks, and above all, sounds as 
a corpulent sleuth would sound. 

The ratings on The Fat Man climbed 
rapidly. From the initial report of 3.4, it 
jumped in 10 months time to a solid 10.8, 
with the share of audience increasing 
from 8.1' , to 2 3.6' , . The Fat Man be- 
came a good advertising buy, and ABC's 
Ted Oberfelder, head of that network's 
promotion department, lost no time in 
pointing out that fact via the radio trade 
press to advertisers and agencies. 

Among those whose eve was caught by 
the The Fat Man promotions was Paul 
Gumbinner, brother of the head of Nor- 
wich's agency. Paul, in his job as the 
agencj 's radio director, had been keeping 
a watchful eye, .it Norwich's request, for 
a --how with a good rating, a good time 
slot, and a family audience. In early 
December, 1946, after having watched the 
upward rating progress of the mystery 
airer. Paul Gumbinner asked ABC for 
more data. 

Things moved in a big hurry after that. 
ABC started a rush project on a presenta- 
tion for the board, with Gumbinner offer- 
ing numerous suggestions to ABC on the 
kind ot information the Nona ich directors 
would expect. By New Year's Day of 
1947. the operation went into high gear. 

On Thursday 2 January 1947, the 
Please turn to page 95) 

SPONSOR 







NOVEMBER 1948 



79 







JACK SMITH 



wes Mcknight 




Plenty of top shows . . 
and balanced program 
ming . . . make CFRB 
your best radio buy 



NOW. with a step-up of p<>w«r to 50,000 
watts — CFRB, Toronto, is out to reach 

more Ontario listeners than ever before! 

CFRB"s top shows are varied to suit 
the preference of Ontario's listeners ... its 
balanced programming providing a range of 
radio fare for every member of the family, 
has always ensured high listenership in 
Ontario's rich and lucrative market. 

The power boost on September 1st to 
the potent new 50,000 watt transmitter, 
and the change of frequency to 1010 on the 
dial, with Ontario-wide promotional pub- 
licity have intensified this market. 

To you, the Advertiser, this means 
more power to every dollar you spend for 
CFRB advertising. So CFRB is still your 
No. 1 buy in Canada's No. 1 market! 




DOROTHY SHAY 
"SPOTLIGHT REVUE 



CFRB 



1010 
ON 
YOUR 
DIAL 



REPRESENTATIVES: 

UNITED STATES: Adam J.Young Jr., Incorporated 

CANADA: All-Canada Radio Facilities Limited 




80 



SPONSOR 



lo West 52nd 

continued from page 11 



Survey of the U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture and from the National Associa- 
tion of Radio Farm Directors reveal that 
the maximum amount of farmers are most 
accessible at midday regardless of the 
type of farming in which they're engaged. 
They also reveal that almost anyone who 
lunches at home does it between 12 and 
1 :00 p.m. 

In line with this thought we have 
spotted our farm news commentator. Will 
Peigelbeck and his Country Folks program, 
on our schedule from 12:30 to 1:00 p.m. 
At this time many of the farmer's most 
difficult and laborious chores are finished 
— he's sitting down to a good meal and at 
that time is interested and ready to find 
out prices, weather, etc., because he is 
still working but, at that time, he's in a 
more comfortable frame of mind. He's 
listening attentively hears not only farm 
news but the sponsor's message better. 

We have letters from farmers, dairy- 
men, etc., which have been sent to Mr. 
Peigelbeck, commending him on his 
choice of time and the program content so 
we can't be too far from wrong, can we? 
James R. Ryall 
Promotion Manager 
WNJR, Newark, N. J. 



that date. If some of the names were not 
submitted on cards postmarked on or 
before 8 August, the card with the name 
and bearing the earliest postmark is the 
winner. 

The names selected by the panel of 
judges (in order of the judges collective 
votes) were 1, National Selective; 2, 
Selective; 3. M-B-M(Market-by-Market) ; 
4, Spot (believe it or not); 5, Impact; 6, 
Focalized; 7, Patterned Radio, and 8, 
Selective Area. Tied for ninth place were 
Directed, Market Radio, Elective, Sele- 
cast and Local Radio. 

The winners are listed by names and 
entries on page 33 of this issue. 



Congratulations to sponsor for the lead 
story 5:30 a.m. on the Farm in your 
October issue. 

You offer convincing proof of the fact 
that there is no better time to reach rural 
listeners. Here at WCCO we have 
realized this for some time. In fact, John 
Trent on his Sunrise Salute drew 17,523 
responses for Kerr Glass (54 sales mes- 
ssages given between 5:30 and 6:30 a.m). 

During the 1948 Minnesota State Fair 
WCCO conducted an informal survey 
among farmers who visited the WCCO 
booth. We were surprised at the number 
who stated they listened to the early 
morning programs on the radio installed 
in the barn. Perhaps someday we can in- 
itiate a survey which will include these sets. 
Tony Moe 

Sales Promotion Manager 
WCCO, Minneapolis 



NEW NAME FOR SPOT 

(Continued from page 33) 

August, even though bearing a winning 
name, do not rate an award if a card bear- 
ing that name was postmarked prior to 



While sponsor had hoped that the 
name selected by the judges would be ad- 
judged by the industry's trade papers as 
being the natural name to replace "spot" 
as an over-all designation for national or 
regional broadcast advertising placed on a 
mnrket-by-market basis, it was generally 
felt that the name was too long and that 
"Selective" was better for common usage. 
As a result it is "Selective" that desig- 
nates all stories and reports concerned 
with other than network advertising in 
this issue of sponsor and in all forthcoming 
issues. It will be used by the trade press 
generally with the exception of Broad' 
casting and Tide. 



WSBT 



— and only WSBT 



— commands the 



South Bend audience 



Sure, people can hear other stations in South 
Bend — but they listen to WSBT. This station 
has won its audience through more than 27 
years of personalized service to this market. 
It gives listeners what they want when they 
want it. This is why the ever-growing WSBT 
audience remains loyal year after vear. Hooper 
after Hooper. No other station even comes 
close in Share of Audience. 










PAUL 



RAYMER COMPANY 



5000 WATTS 



NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



NOVEMBER 1948 



81 




s curve? 




One of the vanishing "sacred cows" in radio is that large audiences have to cost 
a lot of money. The fact is that CBS delivers large audiences at the lowest 
cost per thousand families of any network in radio, large or small. And the cost 
of circulation on CBS today is lower than it has ever been since 1939. 

I MIA * J 
The Columbia Broadcasting System 



November 1948 


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The "Huskies" at Poughkeepsie,— 
WHEC In Rochester 



....FIRST BY LENGTHS! 




WHEC is Rochester's most-listened-to station and has 
been ever since Rochester has been Hooperated! 

WHEC is one of the select Hooper "Top Twenty" 
stations in the U.S. — morning, afternoon and evenings! 









■ • il^^»— 


Lates 


f Hooper before 


closing time. 




STATION 


STATION 


STATION 


STATION 


STATION 


STATION 




WHEC 


B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


MORNING 


33.2 


29.9 


9.2 


7.1 


13.0 


7.1 


8:00-12:00 A.M. 














Monday through Fri. 














AFTERNOON 


36.6 


26.6 


12.2 


8.3 


10.2 


5.0 


12:00-6:00 P.M. 














Monday through Fri. 












Station 


EVENING 


28.5 


28.2 


11.9 


9.6 


13.8 


Broadcasts 
till Sunset 


6:00-10:00 P.M. 

Sunday through Sat. 




JULY-AUGUST HOOPER, 1948 


Only 






Latest be 


r ore closing time. 









BUY WHERE THEY'RE LISTENING: - 




ot 13>c6etfet 



N. Y. 
5,000 WATTS 



Representatives: J. P. Mc KINNEY & SON, New York, Chicago, HOMER GRIFFITH C O ., Los Angeles, San Francisco 



NOVEMBER 1948 



87 



MANAGERS' LAMENT 

(Continued from page 26) 

real money. We are asked to knock our- 
selves out selling listeners on a program 
that may smell to high heaven and when 
we do come through, nobody at the 
agency involved has the good sense to say 
'thank you.' Okay, maybe they think 
that it's part of our job to promote pro- 
grams on our station but if they were to 
stop and check station program promo- 
tion they'd be surprised to uncover the 
fact that some programs receive a great 
deal of promotion and some very little. 



An agency with a good sense of 'thank 
you' lands that extra bit of promotion 
from stations. All business isn't done on 
a production line basis." 

Still another station manager reflects 
the laments of practically all station 
executives on the subject of contests 
where a big prize goes to the station doing 
the best promotion on a program. "It 
isn't fair," says this broadcaster, "to ask 
hundreds of stations' to extend themselves 
advertising and promoting a program, 
when there's only one prize. Maybe it's 
a cheap way of 'buying' program promo- 
tion but a sponsor would be far smarter to 



<J/ft cadte/uv 






mm 



mmmmi 



iKUWOMA'mmmm 




■^}\0' 



Tulsa's only exclusive radio cen- 
ter. Only CBS outlet in the rich 
"Money Maiket" section of pros- 
perous Oklahoma. Write KTUL, 



Boulder on the Park. Tulsa, Okla. 







soop watts 






•'->J 

W 






JOHN ESAU 

Vice-Pres. and Gen. Mgr. 



AVERY-KNODEL, Inc. 

Notionol Representative* 



plan 25 awards instead of one big one. 
He'd also be smart if he presented one to 
each station doing an outstanding promo- 
tion for his program and something extra 
to the department head who supervised 
the promotion. When Ken von and Eck- 
hardt ran a Ford Theater promotion, the 
award was a Ford station wagon — for the 
station. It didn't sit too well with the 
promotion men, who aren't the highest 
paid at stations and who actually carry 
the work burden. The personal element 
is always present and the more an adver- 
tiser remembers this the more promotion 
he'll get for his broadcast advertising 
dollar." 

No station can give all its advertisers 
equal promotion. If it were spread that 
wide, explains one station manager, no 
advertiser would receive enough promo- 
tion to "fill his eye teeth." "An adver- 
tiser should be satisfied with an occasional 
promotion," explains another station 
manager. "Moreover the more grey mat- 
ter he (the advertiser) uses 'suggesting' 
promotions to stations, the more promo- 
tion his programs will receive. If adver- 
tisers and their agencies would conceive 
promotions that would not only promote 
their programs but would make the sta- 
tions and the networks feel that they too 



LOOKING FOR 
PROGRAMS? 

SAotvsBef { 
Network Stm* t 



S£RV//V& 

OMAHA & 
Council Bluffs 



BASIC ABC -5000 WATTS 

Represented by 
tDWARD HTRY CO., INC > 



88 



SPONSOR 



would be realizing something from the 
deal, they'd be surprised how much effort 
a station would expend in promoting. So 
man) 1 promotions seem a one-way street 
that stations steel themselves into say- 
ing 'no.' " 

"If we seem to devote a great deal of 
talk to the subject of promotion," ex- 
plains one station manager, "it isn't 
because we're het up on the subject but 
that every station is beset by requests for 
promotion and merchandising. We ac- 
knowledge that broadcasting lives and 
dies by promotion. We want to do our 
best, but life is short and the budget 
limited. Brother, can you spare a dime?" 

Leaving the subject of promotion 
problems behind, station managers in big 
cities have a very special set of laments 
pointed at sponsors and advertising 
agencies. Many of the managers of sta- 
tions in smaller metropolitan centers jo ; n 
with the big city men in singing these 
specific blues. "There isn't a week that 
goes by," states the manager of a network 
owned and operated station, "that an 
advertiser or an agency executive doesn't 
call me on the phone and ask me to audi- 
tion some 'talent.' Most of the time the 
'talent' has no ability — and even if it did, 
it should be auditioned by our program 
director not by the station manager. 



WDEL 



WGAL 



WKBO 



WRAW 



WORK 



WEST 



Established 1922 
WILMINGTON, DEL. 



Established 1922 
LANCASTER, PA. 

Established 1922 
HARRISBURG, PA. 

Established 1922 
READING, PA. 

Established 1932 
YORK, PA. 

Established 1936 
EASTON, PA. 



Kepreitnttd by 

ROBERT MEEKER 
ASSOCIATES 



Chicago 

San Francitco 



NOVEMBER 1948 



New York 
Lo» Angelei 



When I ask the agency or sponsor execu- 
tive about the ability of the young lady or 
young man whom I am asked to audi- 
tion, I usually receive an answer which 
tells me that the audition requester 
doesn't know. I know that everyone 
wants to 'get into radio' but I think that 
advertisers and agencies who want sta- 
tions to do a better job promoting listen- 
ing should know better than to waste a 
major executive's time, just to impress 
some youngster or her parent. Ft isn't 
that we're not anxious to hear real talent 
but that there're only so many hours in a 
day. I like to see my family once in a 
while." 



The gripe about time wasted by the 
"hopefuls" who want to get into radio 
doesn't stop with having to see and hear 
talent. Station executives are constantly 
besieged by recommended salesmen, sec- 
retaries, clerks, and even bookkeepers, all 
of whom visit the station manager after a 
telephone call or bearing a letter from an 
important advertising executive. Time 
is what broadcasting stations have to sell, 
yet waste of executive time is greater in 
radio than it is in any other field — except 
perhaps TV. If "everyone" wants to get 
into radio, "everyone and his brother" 
wants to be in television. 

(Please turn to page 92) 



WhAtII I WEAR 
THIS EVENING, 

LUIGI?" 





i 



I ain't like the old days when "the 
farmer's day was never done." Now- 
adays with modern farming methods 
that save time and make money, the 
hayseeds in the Red River Valley frit 
time (and dough) to have fun! 

Yep, we got bistros and bingo! Itn I a 
lot of the time we just relax and listen 
to the radio. And mostly to II I) I) . 
The latest Conlan Report (May) for 
the North Dakota \rea shows that 
evenings more of us listen to \\D\Y 
(50.9%) than to the 17 nrxl best stations 
combined. The nearest "competitor" 
has only 11.8%. 

If you want more faney figures, why 
not write us or ask Free X Peters? 
We'd he glad to send you t lie complete 
report. 




FARGO, N. D. 

NBC • 970 KILOCYCLES 
5000 WATTS 




(-^a>- 



Free & Peters, 1st 



Fi .!....< N«iU»*l 



89 



Contests and Offers 



PROGRAM 



a SPONSOR monthly labulaiioa 



JRMOUR & CO 



Chiffon Snap 
Flakes 



Hint Hunt 



MTWTF 
4-4:25 pm 



Various merchandise prizes awarded 
daily 



Send favorite household hint and Chiffon box- 
top to program, Chi. If hint used on air, prizes 
awarded 



CBS 



PAUL F BEICH CO 



Beich Candy 

Bars. Win?. 
Bars 



Whiz Quiz 



10 10:30 pm 



1 Jackpot prizes of merchandise to 

question-senders 2 ["raveling clocks 

riders of nominating li 



1 Send set of quiz questions with two Whiz 
wrappers to program, N. Y. If used, 
awarded, 2 Send letter nominating friend to 
appear on program. Judged on human : 



COLGATE. PALMOLIVE- 
PEET CO* 



Super-Suds 



Blondie 



Wednesday 

8-8:30 pm 



Four 1949 Ford sedans weekly for six 

weeks. Other merchandise prizes plus 

year's supply of Super-Suds 



Send last line to 4-line jingle with boxtop 

from Super-Suds plus dealer's name to contest, 

\ 5 



VBI 



SHC 



CONTINENTAL BAKING CO 



EVERSHARP. INC 
P L0RILLAR0 CO 
SMITH BROS CO 
SPEIDEL CORP 



Wonder Bread, 
Hostess Cakes 



Grand Slam 



EVERSHARP INC 



GENERAL MILLS 



KRAFT FOODS CO' 



KROGER CO 



Pens, razors 
I'M GoldCigs. 
h drops 
Watch bands 



Stop the 
Music 



Eversharp 
Schick J 
Injector 
Razor 



Take It or 
Leave li 



Wheat ies 



.lark 
Armstrong 



Parkay 
Margarine 



The Great 
Gildersleeve 



Various 



Three Kroger 
radio serials, 

plus e.t. 

annemts. 
breaks 



LEVER BROTHERS* 

iTHOS. H LIPTON DIV. 



Lipton's Tea 



Talrllt Scouts 



LEVER BROTHERS' 



LIGGETT & MYERS 



CARL MOHR & CO 



PHILIP MORRIS & CO 



PIONEER SCIENTIFIC CORP 



PROCTER & GAMBLE" 



RALSTON PURINA CO 



TEEN.TIMERS INC 



U S TOBACCO CO 



WIL0R00T CO 



Lifebuoy 



Big Town 



i I 



Supper Club 



Studebaker 
dealer 



Cigarettes 



Polaroid 
TV Lens 



( )xydol 
and 
Duz 



Kalston 






Model, Dill's 
tobai 



i Sridiron 
Echoes 



Everj bodj 

Wins 



MTW I I 
11:30-11 15 am 



Various merchandise prizes, chance at 
Grand Slam bonus 



ist of 5 musical questions to program, 
\ V l Mr must have product names «n 
al top to qualify 



Sunday 

8 9 pm 

(15 min ea.) 



$1S,000 (minimum $1,000) in various 
cash, merchandise prizes 



Listeners call d, ed plus 

"Mystery Melody" 



Sundaj 
10-10:3U pm 



$10,000 first prize. Other cash prizes 
totalling $22,000 



Complete 25-word sentence: "I like 'I" 

sharp Shirk Injector Razor liest because . . ." 

Send with Shiek instruction sheet from new razor 

to contest, N. V. 



MWI 
5:30-6 pm 



Wednesday 
S 30 9 pm 



Monday 
8:30-9 pm 



Tuesday 
10-10:30 pm 



MTWTF 
7-7:15 pm 



As scheduled 

(prior to tele- 
caste of Balto. 

(oil 



Friday 
10-10:3(1 pm 



rlowd 
Doodj 



Ma Perkins 



["ruth or 
quences 



Tom Mix 



Tcentimers 
Club 



Number 



Thursday 
5:45-0 pm 



MTW I I 
3:15 3:30 pm 



Official-size Wilson football and copy 
of Bemie Bierman's book on football 



Send Wheaties boxtop and $2 to sponsor, 
M aneapolis 



Five weekly contests. Each week, 

four 1949 Fords awarded. Other cash 

and merchandise prizes 



Send name for girl baby "adopted" by Gildy 

with Parkay boxtop to sponsor, Chi. Besl 

names win 



"Free food for a year for a family of 

four" based on U, S. Govt, estimates. 

Also Kroger employee contest. Prizes 

to 3 winners in each contest 



Five $1,000 prizes, fifty $100 prizes, 
also vacuum cleaners, Mixmasters 



Thirty 1949 Mercury sedans. Other 
$10 cash prizes in thirty daily con- 
tests 



"Star of the Week" contest : Tu nights 
only. $500 bond prize 



Various low-cost merchandise prizes. 
Grease jobs, movie passes etc 



$20-$100 in cash prizes 



Booklet: "Parlor Tricks with Polaroid" 
autographed by mc Bub Smith, plus 
"magic* picture of Smith and Howdy 



$10,000 first prizi Othel ash prizes 
totalling $40,000 



Saturda 

8 :«i '.i pm 



MTWTF 

5:45-6 pm 



Saturdaj 
1 1 :30-noon 



Saturday 
5-5:30 pm 



"Papa& Mama Hush" stockpile ol mei 

h indi • and services. Mink coats, 

vacations, furniture etc, etc. 



Total of S01 merchandise prizes. 
Bicycles, radios, watches eti 



110,000 total in cash and mi i 

prizes, including a $2,000 scholarship 



$5 for questions used 

jackpot if missed. $50 for correctly- 



Awarded as bonus prizes in eight national con- 
sumer contests of Kraft, Lipton. P&G, C P P, 
Quaker, and Lever. Contestants write name 
"Kroger" on back entry. Best :( "Kroger" 
entries win benus prizes 



Complete 25-word product sentence: "1 
extra enjoyment from the brisk flavor of Lipton 
rea because . . ." Send with Lipton boxtop to 
sponsor. N. V. 



Complete 25-word sentence: 1 like Lifebuoy 
because . . ." and send with Lifebuoy box- 
front to contest, N. V. 



Winners of pre-broadcasl studio spelliri 
name friends to receive phoni call Frii nd must 
identify "mystery voice" of screen star 



Viewers supplj missing facts of famous 
in letters to station 



Scnil list of 5 questions with P-M package 

wrapper to program Cash for use, more if 

contestant misses 



Viewers send in dealer-obtained booklet to pro 

gram. Smith autographs, returns with photo 



i lompli '• -'•"• word si nil nee: "I like thi 
'lifetime' Oxydol, because . . ." Send on 
■ ii ' i ■ Maul, or plain sheet with Oxydol boxtop 
to program, Cinci. 



Three listeners called weekly try to idi 
mystery voices. To qualify, must havi m 

Mental Health Drive, senl same with/ 
without contribution to contest, Hollywood 






IBC 



\r.< 



ABC 



NBC 



Various 



CBS 



NBC 



NBC 



W \1\H-I\ 
Balto. 



CBS 



SBi'-T\ 



SBi 



Send name for Tom's new sorrel colt with 

Ralston boxtop to program, St. Louis. Besl 

names win 



Teen-agers enter contest at local retail store, 

or bj mail. Must write letter identifying "Miss 
M terj I ' eiitimer" from radio clues, write 

letter Supporting OverMtas Aid lor Children 

with contribution of 10c oi more. Send to 
program, N. Y. 



i I i 'i . ind tckpo 

program, S ^ 



|5 ii. 



Send list of any thn i ong to program l"i 
program use' 



NBi 



MBS 



MBS 



MBS 



Don 

I ' i 




■ tied in with Kroger Co. "Free food for i iinily of four" bonus prizes. 



90 



SPONSOR 




"Old Mother Hubbard 

Went to the cupboard . . 
When she came there 

The cupboard was bare . 



Mother Hubbard must not have lived in South Texas. For, with farm income up 
and employment up, there are mighty few if any "bare cupboards" in this rich, pros- 
perous area! 

Here are 67 counties* constituting the daytime primary area of Station WOAI. It is 
a section noted for cattle, oil, cotton. It is great in production, has many needs. Sales 
of food alone to help fill these cupboards amounted to $247,370,000** last year. More 
food was sold here than was sold in either St. Louis or Pittsburgh. 

South Texans have the money to pay for their many requirements. Be sure your 
products are in their cupboards by placing your advertising message over WOAI, the 
popular 50,000-watt station that covers this territory. 



*B.MB 50% to 100% counties 
**©Sales Management 194K Survey of Buying Power 



WOAI 



'&?? 



NBO 50,000 W.CLEAR CHANNEL. TQN 






Represented by EDWARD PETRY & CO., INC. - New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Detroit, St. Louis, San Francisco. Atlanta, Boston 
NOVEMBER 1948 91 



MANAGERS' LAMENT 

(Continued jrotn page 89) 

Station managers constantly lament the 
fact that agencies and advertisers, in buy- 
ing programs, ignore managers' sugges- 
tions. "If a station is successful, there is 
no question but that it is the result of 
management. The fact that two stations 
with comparatively the same wave- 
lengths, power, and network affiliations 
do entirely different jobs in gathering 
audiences proves that beyond a doubt," 
points out the manager of a 5, 000- watt 
network affiliate in a good market. "The 



successful station manager must know 
his market, yet time and time again 
recommendations that we make to spon- 
sors and their agencies are ignored. For 
instance we were taking a feed of a day- 
time serial that hit our area at a time 
when it was preceded by a musical and 
followed by a newscast. We asked per- 
mission to record the program off the 
network line and broadcast it later as 
part of a block of daytime serials. The 
agency and sponsor refused permission. 
Six months later we received a bitter 
letter asking why this program was rated 
lower in our city than in three-quarters of 




For the eighth consecutive year WIBW's huge farm audi- 
ence in Kansas and adjoining stales reaps a rich har\est . . . the 
biggest corn crop in historj . . . the third largest wheat crop on 
record. Our I'irsi Families of Agriculture are richer than ever. 

The high standards of living in their count r\ homes would 
amaze you. Food, clothing and modern conveniences are those 
of the high income <il\ dweller. Here is America's greatest 
unexploited market. 

Reach and sell il as a unit 1>\ using WTBW. Impartial 
hi \e\s show \\ ll'.W is die most-listened-lo and most important 
-ingle sales influence among these wealth) farm families. 



Serving the 

First Families of Agriculture 

Rep. : CAPPER PUBLICATIONS, Inc. 




the rest of the country. We reminded 
the agency of our recommendations, but 
they continued to insist that they could 
not permit a 'd.b.' (delayed broadcast) of 
the program. The program is still on our 
station and it's still at the tail-end of its 
rating among all stations airing it. Some 
agencies get stuck with their own de- 
cisions." 

Station managers are constantly faced 
with requests for programs by types by 
timebuyers. They are asked for women's 
participating programs, newscasts, disk 
jockeys, rise and shine sessions, etc. 
Sometimes the manager knows that an- 
other type of program has the audience 
for the particular product to be sold. Yet 
it's the exception not the rule when a 
station is able to shift a sponsor from his 
desire for a women's participating pro- 
gram to a disk jockey show, for instance, 
even if audience figures prove that the 
latter is a better buy for the advertiser. 
Station managers lament that timebuyers 
generally don't accept or trust the recom- 
mendations of the stations on which they 
buy time. 

"We could save many advertisers a 
great deal of money if they'd listen to us," 
is the way one station manager explains 
the reason why he would like closer liaison 
between the buyer and the seller of 
broadcast time. "Many sponsors," he 
explains, "buy evening time for products 
that are sold 85% to women. It doesn't 
make sense to buy premium time at 
100 r r over daytime rates, to reach 15% 
of a manufacturer's potential market. 
Yet any station manager can point to an 
important number of sponsors on the air 
at night who don't belong there. I know 
that one of the reasons they broadcast at 
night is to flatter their own advertising 
vanity. It places them in the 'big time' 
class. Yet when the chips are down the 
medium surfers because it doesn't produce 
at a ratio that justifies the Class A time 
charges. I don't gripe because adver- 
tisers don't believe everything my sales- 
men tell them, but when they don't be- 
lieve me either, that hurts." 

Station managers do not differ from 
other segments of broadcast advertising 
In lamenting Hooperatings. "They're 
fine," a station spokesman puts it, "just 
as long as they're used for what they are, 
'telephone coincidental ratings within 
metropolitan areas.' When an agency 
uses them to weigh the relative merits of a 
number of stations, each of which covers a 
different area, it goes off half-cocked. In 
New York, for instance, Hooper reports 
on stations range from the daytime-only 
WLIB to the 50,000- watt key stations of 
the networks. In some Hooper reports 



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it's not unusual to find a relatively low- 
powered station having a higher rating 
than a network key station. These sta- 
tions are good buys. There's no doubt 
about that despite the fact that they 
don't get out much beyond the 50-mile 
metropolitan area and some don't even 
cover that market. If a sponsor buys 
strictly on Hoopers he buys a low- 
powered New York station and wonders 
why it doesn't produce since it leads the 
Hooper parade at the hour he buys it. 
Woe is his when sales don't come in and 
outside-of-New York dealers start crying 
for advertising. Hooperatings are great 
things — if they're used correctly." 

A station manager out in the middle of 
the farm territory has a very special 
Hooper gripe. Says he: "About 15 Oc- 
tober we get a per-program Hooper re- 
port showing ratings for the summer 
months. Then about 15 March we get 
a Hooper report for the fall-winter 
months. These reports are used by time- 
buyers to evaluate stations in our area. 
Obviously conditions change so rapidly 
that by the time these reports are issued, 
they can mean something only to station 
management, as an indication of how to 
program — next year. Only if ratings are 
available monthly are they of value as a 
buyers' yardstick." 

Many station managers agree with this 
Midwest executive. There's always one 
station chief who doesn't and he's the 
man whose station Hooper indicates is 
tops. On the matter of Hooper station 
reports being stale when they're released, 
C. E. Hooper explains that monthly 
ratings can be made available, and are in 
a number of markets, if the stations want 
to pay the added costs for the special re- 
ports. However, Hooper explains, it 
doubles the annual cost to the stations. 
There are also some markets in which 
telephone homes are not numerous 
enough to justify monthly reports of the 
type Hooper makes. For these areas, the 
stations, sponsors, and agencies are stuck 
with a report frequency that isn't too 
helpful. What station managers want is 
a timebuying operation where the buyer 
knows what is being bought personally" 
and doesn't have to use old BMB 
(Broadcast Measurement Bureau) figures 
or Hcoperatings which don't apply at the 
season of the year in which the time is 
being bought. 

A Pacific Coast manager expresses it 
this way, "So much depends upon the 
station on which an advertising campaign 
is being placed that to purchase it 
blindly, without any knowledge of the 
local situation, is just throwing money 
away. It's only because broadcasting is 




"Wherever there is music, 'said William 
Cullen Bryant with a poets eye for the 
practical, "there is a throng of listen- 
ers." And wherever there is good music, 
is there is always over WQXR and 
WQXR-FM, there is a throng of lis 
teners to delight the heart of anv adver- 
tising man. More than half a million 
families tunc constantly to these stations 
...so constantly, no other station can 
reach them so effectively. These fami- 
lies love good things as they love good 
music . . . and can afford to buv them. 
That's why advertisers find these families 
a most inviting segment of this biggest 
and richest of all markets. May we pitch 
■your sales -seeking song to this music- 
hungry throng? 




AND WQXR-FM 
RADIO STATIONS OF THE NEW YORK TIMES 



NOVEMBER 1948 



93 



Whether it's 

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or Tripoli 

(IOWA) 

WMT is There! 



■ ROM the tall com fields near 
Montezuma to the dairylands 
around Tripoli, eastern Iowa lis- 
teners keep tuned to WMT for 

complete farm new-. Iu|> enter- 
tainment ami special features 
offered by this exclusive CBS 
eastern Iowa outlet. 

Iowa farmers depend on WMT. 
So do the urban communities 
with their humming industries. 
Reach both these prosperous 
markets via \\ \IT- 600 kc 
Iowa radio s finest frequenc) . 
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CEDAR RAPIDS 

5000 Walts 600 KC. Day & Night 
BASIC COLUMBIA NETWORK 




such a great advertising medium that 
many more campaigns don't fail to pro- 
duce for advertisers. If only all time- 
buyers were permitted to do a little 
traveling, what a different business this 
would be." 

Naturally all station managers do not 
have the same laments. The 50,000-watt 
station executives, unless they are at the 
wrong end of the dial (from 900 kilocycles 
up to 1600 kilocycles) have a set of 
laments quite distinct from the high- 
powered low end of the dial stations. 
They complain that timebuyers fre- 
quently purchase time on a power basis 
without realizing that wavelengths have 
almost as important a bearing on station 
coverage as power. A station located in 
the under-900 kilocycle band is bound to 
lay down a better signal, watt for watt, 
than stations between 900 and 1600 kc. 

"Too many agency executives are 
power crazy," laments one station man- 
ager. "They know that advertisers are 
impressed by 50kw outlets and they buy 
them regardless of their impact. There 
are many lOkw stations that output! 
50kw outlets. Timebuying can't be 
done with a yardstick of power. When an 
agency executive uses power alone to de- 
termine what stations to purchase, he's 
liable to purchase the greatest collection 
of cats and dogs as well as some of the 
nation's most productive broadcasting 
outlets. There isn't anything that can 
replace factual knowledge of each sta- 
tion's ability to produce sales of the type 
a sponsor is seeking. A well-informed 
timebuyer is an advertising agency's 
greatest gift to a sponsor." 

Lack of timebuying flexibility is one of 
the greatest problems that station man- 
agers have to face. They don't blame the 
timebuyers, nor do they blame advertis- 
ing in general. "It's just," said one sta- 
tion manager as he signed off, "a blind 
spot in broadcast advertising." Station 
managers generally agree that the NAB oi 
some other group could well plan forums 
for timebuyers throughout the nation. 
Timebuyers, it's agreed, are the most 
willing group working in radio. 

Despite literally hundreds of laments, 
gripes, and objections to advertising and 
advertising agency practices, station man- 
agers generally are happy. Most of them 
admit that the laments they have are 
based upon the fact that they were lax 
about some broadcast advertising factor 
and then laxness has plagued them ever 
since. Broadcast advertising is a very 
closely integrated business. What a sta- 
tion permits one advertiser to do becomes 
station-wide practice before the manager 
r< .ih.es it. * * * 



SOON 



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a half dollar market that spreads 
over two great states. A letter 
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you all the facts, as well as cur- 
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KWFT 



THE TEXAS-OKLAHOMA STATION 

Wichita Falli— 5.000 Watti— 620 KC— CBS 

Represented by Paul H. Raymer 

Co., and KWFT, 801 Tower 

Petroleum Bldg .. Dallas 



94 



SPONSOR 



NORWICH PHARMACAL 

(Continued from page 78) 

agency saw the completed presentation. 
On Friday, 3 January, the Messrs. Gum- 
binner (Lawrence and Paul) and Milton 
Goodman from the agency, and Ted 
Herbert and Tom Fry of ABC Sales were 
taking an early train at Grand Central, 
bound for the drug firm's home office in 
Norwich, N. Y. 

Later that same day, a dozen Norwich 
directors, including Norwich president 
Melvin C. Eaton, Board Chairman Rob- 
ert S. Eaton, Vp John Alden and others, 
sat around the big oak table in the Nor- 
wich board room. From 10:15 in the 
morning to 4:30 in the afternoon, they 
listened attentively while Herbert and 
Fry made their pitch. 

Then, Herbert and Fry went down- 
stairs to the lobby to pace the floor and 
chain-smoke cigarettes. In 15 minutes 
they had their answer: "Okay, we'll buy 
it." It was one of the fastest sales ABC 
had ever made. 

On 14 February 1947, Norwich began 
its first national-network broadcast ad- 
vertising. To cover the time-and-talent 
costs of The Fat Man on a 125-station 
network, Norwich's board had to vote an 
increase in the advertising budget of some 
15% (up to $1,500,000). The ratio of the 
magazine budget to radio (newspaper 
coverage was all but eliminated) was 
made about 50-50. 

Norwich and Gumbinner, now that 
they were in network selling, had no in- 
tentions of permitting The Fat Man to 
exist in a promotion vacuum. Ads ap- 
peared quickly in drug trade journals, 
headlined with: "NON-STOP RADIO 
ADVERTISING!", telling the druggists 
that The Fat Man was going to stay 
"on the air all year 'round, summer as 
well as winter, steadily fattening Pepto- 
Bismol sales for you." To the sales force 
went a plush promotion kit, showing 
scenes from a typical The Fat Man show, 
plus a personally-autographed picture of i 
J. Scott Smart as the "Fat Man." 

The sales force ate it up. When one of 
their members called on a druggist after 
The Fat Man premiered for Norwich 
(Norwich had moved the show over to 
Friday night into a block of higher-rated 
ABC mystery programs with good effect) 
the salesman would bring the topic around 
to advertising. "Heard our new radio 
show?" the salesman would ask, whipping 
out the promotion kit on the show. 
"You can take it from me," the Norwich 
man would state firmly, "this big fellow's 
gonna do a swell job of selling for you as 

NOVEMBER 1948 



WSM ENDOWED PA/NT ? 




A large paint manufacturer recently made a point that is 
well worth passing along to other advertisers who are 
interested in this great Southern market. 

The manufacturer* wrote: . . . "In expansion of territory 
and opening up of new dealer accounts we have found this 
show (a half-hour live talent program over WSM) has played 
a major part in that success ..." 

This is added proof that when you use WSM you add an 
invisible stamp of approval to your goods in this section. 
Whether it's paint, padlocks or petunias, the buying public 
and dealers alike know they can put their confidence in a 
WSM-advertised product. 

*Name furnished on request. 



WSM 



NASHVILLE 







HARRY STONE, Gen. Mgr. • IRVING WAUCH. Com. Mgr. • COWARD PETRY & CO., Notional Rep. 
30,000 WATTS • CLEAR CHANNEL • 6S0 KILOCYCLES • NBC AFFILIATE 



95 



well as for me." The clincher came when 
the salesman produced the autographed 
picture. "He's really a great guy," the 
salesman would add unctuously as the 
druggist ogled the picture. "Why, he's a 
good friend of mine." 

Maybe it was a bit obvious, maybe it 
wasn't. But it began to produce results. 
Druggists began to give better shelf posi- 
tions to Norwich's air-sold products, 
Pepto-Bismol, Unguentine, Zemocol, etc., 
and to use the stickers and counter dis- 
plays featuring The Fat Man. 

Actually, the copy on the show was, 
and still is, pretty much like Norwich 
space advertising of the past few years. 
What did the trick for Norwich was the 
fact that radio had a newness, a show- 
business flair, that the magazine and news- 
paper advertising lacked. 

As Norwich had expected, the first part 
of 1947 was tough sledding when it came 
to sales. Retail drug sales on all drug 
products held up well with an average 
monthly total of $300,000,000. But, the 
druggists were selling a good deal of it 
from their overstocked inventories, and 
buying was off. At the end of the first 
quarter of 1947, Norwich realized that it 
was taking a beating. Its 31 March 
1947 quarter showed a net income of a 
comparatively microscopic $2,773. (The 
same quarter a year previous had shown 
a net income of about $250,000.) The 
earning per share of Norwich stock was 
$.003, for the quarter. (It had been 
running around $.32.) 

Most firms would have taken one look 
at a report like that, and started cutting 
down on advertising in a big hurry. But 
Norwich had learned that it took time to 
make radio pay off, even when they had 
a high-rated show. 

It began to pay off sooner than they 
had really dared hope. In the quarter 
ending in June, the net income was up to 
$135,548. By the end of March, 1948, it 
had climbed to $256,446 and three months 
Liter, in ]uw 1948, it was $267,133. 
Other stomach-sweeteners, most of which 
had reduced their advertising m the gen- 
eral 1947 slump, began to show sales in- 
creases oi 2 V ,. But Norwich's Pepto- 
Bismol, which had been plugged hard all 
through the tough selling of the summer 
of 1947, showed an upward sales climb of 
IV,. Radio had done its job well. 

The Fat Man is continuing to do a good 
selling job on Norwich products. In the 
spring of 1948, Norwich introduced a new 
product, a brushless version of their shave 
cream, SWAV. Norwich had decided to 
bring out a brushless cream when their 
resc.u. Ii showed that of the $26,000,000 



spent annually for various shaving 
creams, 60' , went for brushless creams. 

The new SWAV was given its first ad- 
vertising push on The Fat Man. Usually, 
two commercials out of the three heard on 
the show are devoted to selling Pepto- 
Bismol, and the third to one of the other 
Norwich products. For a 10- week period 
in the spring of 1948, SWAV had the third 
commercial. Advance copies of the com- 
mercials went out to all the Norwich 
salesmen. They reported that when 
druggists knew the product was going to 
be presold on The Fat Man, they didn't 
hesitate to stock it. Results of the air- 
selling thus done for SWAV are as yet 
inconclusive, but Norwich is positive in 
its feeling that radio will do a good job of 
establishing the product with consumers. 

Another major benefit that has come 
to Norwich selling from The Fat Man is 
that the sales curve, which used to be 
highly seasonal, is now leveling off. 
New stations are added to the network 
whenever Norwich feels that a new area 
shows promise. There are no official 
estimates yet as to how high the Norwich 
net sales for 1948 will be. Vp John Alden 
has made some friendly bets with his 
associates as to the actual figure. "I was 
optimistic," he reports, "but I think I'm 
going to have to pay up. I guessed too 
low." Alden adds, however: "That's the 
kind of bet I don't mind paying." How- 
ever, some have estimated that Norwich 
net sales for this year may go as high as 
$12,000,000 . . .or higher. 

The success of Norwich and The Fat 
Man is not a startling, overnight success. 
It's basically an object lesson in broadcast 
advertising where a sponsor has bought a 
network show to do a specific type of job 
for him . . . and has stayed with it long 
enough for the show to accomplish the 
job. * * * 



PROSPEROUS FARMER 

(Continued from page 44) 

well as for "outside" farm-supply people, 
by strictly localizing its service news, 
reports, and "how to" information. 

What a station knows about the agri- 
cultural needs of its area — and what it 
does about it are marks of the quality of 
its farm service, and therefore of its farm 
audience. Stations that strongly em- 
phasize imaginative, progressive, and 
((insistent service programing have 
proved time and again that a substan- 
tial number of listeners get the habit of 
depending on the station for all their 
farm information. 

The technical and personal qualifica- 



tions (previously outlined) of a farm 
broadcaster are another guide to the 
quality and holding power of the pro- 
gram. 

Dr. D. H. LeGear, head of sales and 
advertising of the L. D. LeGear Medicine 
Company (poultry, stock, and dog reme- 
dies) has written of KVOO's 12:45-1:00 
p.m. Farm Profit Bureau, "LeGear sales- 
men say they'd rather not operate with- 
out the program." He adds that when 
they started with the show sales jumped 
and held; "you can almost draw a map 
where high sales drop off to coincide with 
the drop of KVOO'S primary coverage. 

"Of vital importance is the fact we 
get much better cooperation with our 
dealers in window display and other point 
of sale action." 

The Farm Profit Bureau is a show dedi- 
cated to improving pastures and showing 
fanners how to make them yield more 
dollars and cents for the space they take 
up. This five-a-week late noon session 
hasn't had a rural coincidental rating, but 
it has a Tulsa Hooperating of 9 to 10. 
This compares with ratings of half of the 
city-listener-designed shows broadcast at 
the same time. 

The station pulls a similar Hooper 
on Sunday with its 12:15-12:45 noon Feed 
the Soil. The show started three years 
ago with a 15 minute program including 
only 57 words of commercial about the 
benefits in increased yields and better 
health from spreading agricultural lime 
stone on the farm. There was music and a 
five-minute report on what farm people 
were doing to fertilize the soil, before and 
after stories. 

Anchor Stone and Mater'als was (and 
still is) the sponsor. They increased the 
time to 30 minutes after the first year, 
but still use only 57 words of commercial, 
which is generally institutional. When 
production gets ahead of sales, Anchor 
introduces a few straight selling com- 
mercials. They usually bring the situation 
into balance quickly. A recent 20-word 
spot on crushed rock for paths between 
house and bam, to keep cattle out of 
mud around watering tanks, etc., pulled 
so many orders within three days that 
Anchor canceled it and returned the 
following Sunday to their 57-word insti- 
tutional pitch. 

Although the farmer gets the primary 
benefit from a service program, he's by 
no means the only one who gets actual 
service benefits. Lime venders- the men 
who operate the trucks that spread the 
lime on farms — aren't hired by the lime 
company. They're on the itinerant side 
and often not too dependable. 

Feed the Soil broadcasts have re- 



96 



SPONSOR 



TV 



Rates & Factbook No. 5 

itu ludes 

• Television Networks & Stations 
Operating: Rates & Data 

• Construction Permits Granted & 
Applications Pending 

• Directory of TV Manufacturers & 
Receiving Sets 

• Directory of Television Program 
Sources 

• Present & Proposed TV Channel 
Allocations by Cities 



piWI Directory No. 2 

' ■■■ includes cities and states 
All FM Stations now broadcasting 
and under construction. All applica- 
tions pending before FCC with mail- 
ing addresses, AM network affilia- 
tions, frequencies, powers, antenna 
heights. Same detailed data for non- 
commercial educational stations. Also 
an up-to-date allocation table. 



These Up-to-Minute DIRECTORIES 

Revised to October 1, 1948 

$5.00 each 



Send chec\ with order to: 

Television Digest & FM Reports 

1519 Connecticut Avenue 
Washington, D. C. 




ANGANt 

•*{<"»< PORTLAND 

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UY 
ANNETT 

BROADCASTING SERVICES 
WGUY-FM WGAN-FM 




National Representative 
PAUL H. RAYMER 



*"*2&2Sfr- 



suited in tying venders who have handled 
Anchor lime much closer to the company 
than any other group of venders to any 
other lime crushing company. In fact, 
the program service has virtually made 
them salesmen for Anchor without their 
being on the Anchor payroll. 

One of the most impressive arguments 
of the station that specializes in an 
aggressive farm service operation is the 
difference between a farm authority 
and a farm reporter. 

A farm authority (as discussed earlier) 
is equipped to make his station a farm 
educational leader (not an educational 
center). There's ample evidence that 
the cumulative effect of such service- 
leadership, when exploited with proper 
promotion, is a most powerful factor in 
building and keeping a loyal, responsive 
group of dialers. 

The fact that a farm broadcaster may 
largely confine himself to a reporting 
job on farm information doesn't mean 
that job can't be done well; it doesn't 
mean he can't gather, hold, and sell, his 
own audience. It does mean he hasn't the 
potential added influence that belongs to 
authority and active leadership in farm 
matters. 

You'll find a third mark of programing 
that makes the most of its opportunities 
in talking to farmers in who controls the 
proeram standards. The competent farm 
broadcaster is usually the onlv station 
emplovee properlv qualified to pass on 
program material and practices. He 
alone knows exactlv what he's trving 
to do with his farm service and entertain- 
ment (if anv). 

Most leaders among radio farm direc- 
tors don't accept a product for sponsor- 
ship unless they are personally haDpy 
with it. Thev won't ask their followers 
to accept their counsel on farm problems 
and use that same prestige to back a 
product if thev haven't confidence in it. 

Station salesmen don't always under- 
stand this relationship between program- 
ing and sales.' A WIZ (New York) sales- 
man once sold a sponsor 52 weeks partici- 
pation across the board on Phil Alamoi's 
Farm News without consulting Phil. 
When the salesman came to him, Phi 
turned the sponsor down on the ground 
that his product wasn't one he would use 
on his own farm. 

Another instance highlights the rela- 
tionship of program content to both 
farm service and farm sponsors. A sales- 
man tried regularly for six months to sell 
an important spray manufacturer a 
participation on the WIZ Farm News. 
One dav he asked Phil Alampi to go with 
him. When Phil explained the service 



MORE 

People In This Area Listen To WPTF 
Every Single Broadcasting Quarter 
Hour Than To Any Other Station! 




WPTF dominates all competition at all 
times. That's the report of the 1948 
LISTENER DIARY STUDY. (Con- 
ducted by Audience Surveys, Inc. in 
WPTF's 62 counties with 50% or better, 
day and night, BMB coverage.) 



Findings include sets-in- 
use, station ratings, 
share-oraudienceflow 
and composition by 
quarter hours. 




Rep. FREE & PETERS, Inc. 



NOVEMBER 1948 



97 



KMLB 

KEY TO RICH 
NORTHEASTERN 
LOUISIANA 
MARKET 



w MONROE 
LOUISIANA 



fmnf 



FACTS- 

KMLB serves a 100 million 
dollar market loaded with 
high-powered buying incomes 
per capita . . . wide range of 
induslry and diversified farm- 
ing. K VI LI J has more listeners 
in northeastern Louisiana than 
all oilier stations combined. 

5,000 WATTS DAY 
1,000 WATTS NIGHT 



AFFILIATED WITH 

American Broadcasting Company 

Represented by 

Taylor-Borroff & Company, Inc. 



nature of the show, that it included in- 
formation and advice on spraying of 
fruits, vegetables, etc., the manufacturer 
signed. 

What might he called the rule of 
relevance in selecting material for a farm 
service broadcast — choosing material that 
relates most closely to "advancing the 
business and science of farming and en- 
couraging better farm living" — applies 
also to the presentation of the broadcast. 
It must talk the farmer's language. This 
is an indispensable mark of the effective 
broadcast. 

Talking the farmer's language doesn't 
mean "talking down." Understanding 
the technical language, or idiom, of farm- 
ing is a must. Understanding the pro- 
blems of farming, and sympathy with them 
are vital. (Personality qualifications 
necessary for top farm broadcasting are 
discussed more fully in part one of this 
report.) 

Another important mark of the most 
successful presentations is the frequent 
use of interviews. Straight talks rank 
second in preference as a form of presen- 
tation with the majority of the farm 
audience. 

Use of recorded material makes no 
difference to farmers if the material 
is as interesting and presented as well 
as it would be live. Some farm directors 
use as many as 20 recorded features a week. 

You'll rarely find a successful farm 
director using a script, unless it's for 
statistics (including market reports) or 
for a reference too technical or involved 
for extemporaneous handling. In the few 
exceptional cases where scripts are used 
(WGY, Schenectady's Chanticleer, for 
example), the farm broadcaster writes it. 

The good "farm" program is charac- 
terized primarily by its weather, market, 
and farm news and information. About 
half the farm broadcasters of the country 
have discovered their listeners also want 
some music on both the morning and 
noon shows. One thing stands out clearly 
from the evidence: where«one segment of 
listeners prefers a "strictly business" 
farm program another prefers music with 
its business. The answer in any instance 
depends on the judgment and the ca- 
pacity of the individual farm director. 
Chanting exceptions can be cited, the 
evidence tends to show that the more a 
qualified farm director emphasizes "busi- 
ness," the gicah i tendency his program 
has to select the alert and progressive 
listeners who are best qualified to profit 
In >m such a program. 

Stations like WLW, Cincinnati, and 
\\ \l I . Cedai Rapids, Iowa, who pro- 
gram an important pan oi their broad' 



cast day for farm listeners, arrange their 
shows in a way which allows them to 
devote the necessary emphasis to im- 
portant farm service features, while still 
providing music and other entertainment 
features. 

WMT, for example, provides an hour 
across the board from 12 noon to 1 p.m. 
with the essential farm information in 
the middle and entertainment on both 
sides. Wilson and Company sponsors the 
12:30 12:40 p.m. (farm information) 
segment of the hour, which since the 
feature started three years ago has built 
a following of nearly 90% of potential 
listeners in the nearby counties. The 
average listenership to this feature in the 
full Wilson Cedar Rapids plant trade 
area is about 50% of the potential listen- 
ership. 

The KMBC Dinner Bell Round-up 
(KMBC, Kansas City) from noon to 
1 p.m. daily is constructed in a manner 
similar to WMT's noon hour show. 
KMBC, for many years one of the coun- 
try's outstanding farm-service stations, 
has now strengthened that service with 
a unique operation. 

Nearly 200 miles west of Kansas City 
the Midland Broadcasting Company set 
up its KFRM transmitter which trans- 
mits a signal into the heart of Kansas 
farmlands. Programing is from Kansas 
City. The KMBC-KFRM team broad- 
cast many farm features, such as the 
Dinner Bell, simultaneously. All KFRM 
service and entertainment programs are 
constructed specifically for farm dialers. 
Shows of proved interest only to urban- 
ites are restricted wholly to KMBC. More 
than a dozen daytime shows, however, 
get the dual airing. 

Another radical move in a different 
direction got under way recently to 
provide more specialized farm programs 
in New York. Ten farm organizations 
established an FM radio network to 
serve farm homes throughout the state. 
The Rural Radio Network Inc. is wholly 
owned by the farm organizations con- 
cerned. The program policy is to "give 
farmers information and entertainment 
they want when they want it." 

U. S. Department of Agriculture and 
other surveys show that aside from a 
somewhat narrower range of interests 
(arm people are interested in the same 
kinds of radio entertainment as city 
people. They like musk and comedy, 
for example, although their favorite per- 
formers may dill'ei from metropolitan 

favorites. * * * 

► Pari three of our farm storj details the rules 
(.ir successful use ol farm 8 :rvlce programs and 
reports on rural entertainment programs for 

I he farm famiK . 



98 



SPONSOR 



CUBAN PICTURES 

(Continued from page 32) 

a U. S. network. A half hour is 26' 2 
minutes in Cuba. 

In 1939 Goar Mestre, having set up a 
distributing business in Cuba and desir- 
ing to use broadcast advertising, bought a 
block of time from RHC. He promised to 
produce worth-while programs instead of 
a lot of spot announcements sandwiched 
in between sessions of rumba music. He 
asked for and received a substantial con- 
cession of a two-hours-for-the-cost-of-one 
nature. Soon his programs were the most 
listened-to on the island. RHC, which 
prior to Mestre's commercial programing 
trailed other broadcast operations, began 
to climb in importance. Finally it passed 
CMQ, the other network on the island, 
and RHC management in 1943 decided 
it had given Mestre too generous a deal. 
It cut the time made available to him by 
one-third, which in turn drove him to 
talking business with the competition. 
He told CMQ management that he 
wasn't interested in buying time and then 
being squeezed for more money after he 
built an audience for his programs and 
the network. CMQ needed money and 
Goar Mestre bought in on the operation 
and today with two brothers (Abel and 
Luis) and Angel Cambo operates CMQ 
in a newly-opened multi-million dollar 
Radiocentro in Havana. 

Mestre brought soap operas to Cuba — 
for better or for worse. Even the sunlight 
hours deliver ratings of 18 and 20, against 
Hooper and Nielsen ratings for similar 
programs in the States of 6 to 10. Prac- 
tically all the high-ranking programs in 
Cuba are dramatic serials, with two 
possible exceptions, Lo Que Pasa en el 
Mundo, a Cuban March of Time spon- 
sored by P&G, and La Guantanamera, 
which dramatizes the crime and triangle 
stories in the news each day with a crime- 
doesn't-pay slant but with all the pory 
details. La Guantanamera is sponsored by 
Colgate-Palmolive-Peet. 

A typical report of leading programs, 
in their rank order, would generally show 
up something like this: 



Program 


Network 


Sponsor 


"El Dereeho de N'acer" 






" 1 he Right to Be Born" 


CMQ 


Krcsto 


"Tamakum" 


KI1C 


P&G 


"Angeles de la Calle" 






"Angels of the Street" 


CMQ 


CPP 


"Los Tres Villalobos" 






"The Three Villalobos" 


RHC 


P&G 


"Novela Palmolive" 






" 1 he Palmolive Drama" 


CMQ 


CPP 


"Lo Que Pasa en el Mundo" 






"March of Time" type 


RHC 


P&G 


"Novela de la~ 1" 






"4 o'clock Drama" 


CMQ 


P&G 


"La Novela del Cafe Pilon" 


CMQ 


Pilon Coffee 


"La Guantanamera" 


CMQ 


P&G 



"La Ranchurlrr-T RHC CPP 

"Radio Novela Dermos" CMQ Gravi 

The 12 leading advertisers in the order 
of their budgets are: 

Crusellas & Cia (Colgate-Palmolive-Peet) 

Sabates, S. A. (Procter & Gamble) 

Laboratories Gravi. S. A. 

N'urv.i Fabrica de Hielos (< ristal & Tropical Beer) 

Trinidad & Hno (Cigarettes) 

Domingo Mendoza & Hijo (Cigarettes) 

Partagas S. A. (Cigarettes) 

Standard Oil of Cuba 

Sterling Products International 

krrsto (Bestove Products) 

Bacardi 

Canada Dry (soft drinks) 

Even Canada Dry, ranking 12th in 
advertising budget, spends over $100,000 
a year in Cuba. This is one fact that 
Cuban advertising men want stressed to 
U. S. manufacturers — "It costs money 
to reach Cuba and it can't be done with 
Central American budgets of a few 
hundreds a month." 

It's also an important Latin American 
market in which broadcast advertising 
has been placed on a real business basis. 
Even a government official who broad- 
casts has to buy commercial time. No 
matter how great the occasion every 
speech by a politico is commercial and 
time must be paid for before the broad- 
cast. Typically, several years ago Presi' 
dent Ramon Grau San Martin was 
making his regular 10 October speech 
(Cuba's Independence Day). The gov- 



r~ 




MEMPHIS 




ON YOUR 



10,000 Watts Day Time 
5,000 Watts Night Time 




RENCi 



*f k^ ^E tttf 



RADIO REPRESENTATIVES, INC. 

480 Lexington A«e„ tow York, N. Y. 




ANOTHER RECORD.' 

KQV's terrific daytime audience goes right on setting 
response records that amaze even the experts. Take 
our new give-away show sponsored locally, 9:45 to 10 
a.m. three days a week, with plenty of sock competition 
like the Breakfast Club. Yet, during the first few days, 
over 7,000 listeners flocked into the sponsor's store to 
register their telephone numbers. Proves once again 
that nothing in the Pittsburgh market can touch the 
results you get from KQV's Aggressive promotion! 



PITTSBURGH'S AGGRESSIVE 
RADIO STATION 

Basic Mutual Network • Natl. Rtps. WEED A CO. 



NOVEMBER 1948 



99 



WMBD 



cbynti*tatk4- 
PEORIAREA 




Local advertisers base their adver- 
tising on RESULTS . . . and in the 
highly competitive Peoria market, 
local retailers buy more program 
and announcement time by far on 
WMBD than on any other Peoria 
station. Here's why . . . 

^ SHARE OF AUDIENCE 

Greater than ali other Peoria sta- 
ll is COMBINED! (Hooper I'eoria 
III. Fall - Winter Report. Oct.. 
1947 - Feb., 1948). 

^ PROGRAM Know-How 

Full stair orchestra ... 1 veteran 
newsmen . . . T.\ other program 
personalities presenting 14 hours 
live entertainment weekly. Total 
.staff of fir. trained personnel. 

/~* PROMOTION AND 
^^ MERCHANDISING 

FULL SCALE! 70 Announcements 
v... kly . . . newspapers . . . ear 
cards . . . displays . . . direct mail 
. . . merchandising publication. 

^ NEW FACILITIES 

New AM and PM powei 

watts AM with 20,000 watt I ■> 
at no extra cost) . . . increa 
coverage . . . new, modern theatre 

& studios. 

\^K FREE & PETERS 




PEORIA 

CBS Affiliate • 5000 Watt. | 
Fret A Petert, Inc., Nat'l. Reps. 



eminent had paid the network for an 
hour'^ time but Dr. Grau was still going 
strong as the 60 minutes drew to a close. 
The network's program manager called 
the seat of the government (the Palace) 
and spoke to the official who controlled 
the budget foi broadcasting. He asked 
whether or not he should cut the Presi- 
dent off the air at the end of the hour. 
The official said "no" and asked how 
long the program manager thought 
Grau would go on speaking. The pio- 
gram manager answered, "half an hour 
and that means $300 more must be 
here at the station befoie the hour runs 
out." The cash was at the network in time 
to avoid interference with the oration. 
All political talks must be paid for in 
advance in Cuba just as they are paid 
for in advance at many stations in the 
United States. 

Cuban listeners are conditioned to a 
lot of advertising. It's not even unusual 
for local stations to program spot an- 
nouncements for competing products 
right next to each other. Cuban audi- 
ences are not surprised when they hear a 
Coca-Cola announcement on the "Pause 
That Refreshes" followed by a Pepsi- 
Cola jingle, both in the middle of a block 
of announcement advertising. Indicative 
of how Latins are conditioned to com- 
mercials is Havana's time signal and news 
station. The time is broadcast every 
minute followed by a five- or ten-second 
commercial, with the rest of each minute 
being devoted to news. This station 
(CMCB) operates under an unique per- 
mit from the Cuban government which 
has not only issued a special "public 
service" license but, because of the special 
license, has established a rate card for 
the station as well. Only one other station 
like CMCB is said to be operating and 
that is a Mexican station (XEQK). 
By special permission of the Mexican 
government, XEQK is permitted to 
broadcast nothing but time signals every 
minute, and commercials. Watches aren't 
as universal in the Latin American 
countries as they are north of the border 
and so time signals are important. 

Cuba is one of the few Latin American 
nations with a sizable dollar balance. 
There's no shortage of dollar exchange 
in the nation ,is there is in many other 
South American nations. Sugar is a 
major export and the U. S. takes most of 
it. There is very little manufacturing 
done for sale and distribution mi the 
island, except cigars, rum, some cotton 
fabrics and soaps and cleanup. Imports 
from the U. S. exceed $200,000,000. 
Because there is a health) dollar balance 
available, Cuba is being shipped not only 



its own allotment of manufactured goods 
but a good part of the allotments of other 
nations which are short of dollai bal- 
ances. The result is that there is no 
dearth of U. S. products. They're 
expensive of course, since Cuban import 
duties are as high, for instance, as 
33 V^ c , on Foid cars. That doesn't mean 
that a considerable number of Ford cars 
aren't bought, but that even the "low" 
priced model? in the line cost well over 
$3,500, The Cuban government is 
largely supported by import duties 
instead of income taxes. The latter are 
so low that a man earning $15,000 
pays less than $300 in personal imposts. 

Local cigarettes dominate the tobacco 
sales, since they cost smokers only 10c, 
while imported U. S. brands cost 35c. 
The Cuban is generally classified as a 
national who lives for today. His worries 
about manana are reserved for manana. 
What he has in his pocket today is ex- 
pendable. He likes the good things of 
life and doesn't hesitate to buy them. 

Firms like Sterling Products Inter- 
national, American Home Products, and 
other purveyers of pharmaceuticals who 
moved into the Latin American markets 
during the early unorganized days of 
South and Central American radio, are 
cutting their budgets. Home office orders 
to watch the pennies have been given 
and drug budgets are being cut not only 
in Cuba but in many other Spanish 
speaking countries. More and more 
advertisers however are using radio in 
Cuba. Nowhere in the world is there a 
city like Havana with 28 standard 
broadcasting stations and 14 short wave 
outlets. All fight for Havana's audience but 
five to six reach a majority of the dialers. 

The newest of the stations in town 
(CMBF) is owned by CMQ and is pat- 
terned after New York's WQXR. It 
went on the air during March of this year. 
There is insufficient data currently to 
justify any report on the Cuban capital's 
acceptance of the "good music" formula. 

Cuba is a lush market for U. S. adver- 
tisers. Adapted to local conditions the 
same program formulas which appeal to 
dialers in the 48 states appeal to Cubans. 
Audience participation programs, give- 
away shows (they were very big until war- 
created product shortages killed the jack- 
pots and they're coming back) and, 
above all, soap operas, appeal to the 
Latin mind. 

There's only one surprise much as 
the) like to dream and escape via the air, 
they arc not too disturbed when com- 
mercials briny them down to earth — 
just as long as they have the cash to buy 
what is beint! advertised. 



100 



SPONSOR 



RELIGION 

(Continued from page 72) 

limited exclusively to the theme of prayer 
in the home. Don Ameche, E. G. Robinson, 
Eddie Cantor, Irene Dunne. Ethel Barry- 
more, Loretta Young, and Maureen 
O'SuIlivan are some of the stars of stage 
and screen who have already appeared. 
The "commercial" following the play is 
an appeal calculated, in Father Peyton's 
own words, to "help counteract influ- 
ences that are pulling the family apart." 
It is his feeling that if prayer is restored 
in the family, the most powerful means 
of keeping them together is achieved. The 
average American businessman, a family 
man, feels that Father Peyton's appeal 
for keeping the family together is con- 
structive. His signature is the slogan 
"The Family that Prays Together — Stays 
Together." This slogan is featured on 
streamlined illuminated billboards, 60 
by 16 feet, placed in strategic locations in 
37 U. S. cities at the present time. These 
billboards are the gift of National Out- 
door Advertising, Inc., which encourages 
its members to donate billboards. 

Father Peyton has had his most 
difficult time procuring sponsors for the 




~Wti/>ua4. 



WDSU 



WDSU broadcasts 5000 watts 
from the French Quarter to 
the Gulf and South Louisiana listeners. 

From daily association with time-honored 
New Orleans institutions WDSU has 
developed a high quality of integrity. 
WDSU devotes program time regularly 
and exclusively to the St. Louis Cathedral, 
the International House, Moisant Inter- 
national Airport, Tulanc University, 
Union Station, the Municipal Auditorium, 
Symphonies and Operas. 

WDSU's dominate Hoop, 
crating proves that hon- 
oring local institutions 
creates high listener 
loyalty. 



\ 



V 



ORLEANS MinC II Affifiafe 

'280 kc wans 

John Blair & Company, Representative 



program (cost about $1500 a week). 
This is what is "breaking his back." His 
plan is six corporations and six groups of 
men in various cities throughout the 
country to pledge support of the pro- 
gram for a specific month, each year. 
He already has three months pledged: 
the president of Firestone is personally 
underwriting the month of January; a 
group of men in Rochestei, N. Y., have 
pledged the month of July; and busi- 
nessmen in Pittsburgh have pledged one 
month a year. Swift & Company has 
paid for five shows to date, but is not 
committed to a revolving pledge. 

The Family Theater, in its dramatiza- 



tions of social and spiritual problems, 
presents the solutions from the Roman 
Catholic viewpoint. Father Peyton is 
quick to point out that the program is 
by no means to be considered an inter- 
taith program. He feels, strongly, that 
the program represents the Roman 
Catholic dogma in its relation to the 
basic social unit, the family. 

Religious broadcast programing need 
not be grasping or predatory. It need not 
solicit funds over the air. It can sell itself 
as any product does, by making its mes- 
sage so convincing that people will want 
to buy— to turn to God and to religion 
to learn more about Him. 



QoUuf cM-iCflte/i Coesiy Ifed/i! 

The last three Hooper Station Listening 
Index Surveys made in Roanoke show an in- 
creasing preference for WDBJ, the Pioneer j? 
radio station in this wealthy market. Here are 
the daily average -share -of- audience figures: 

1947 (Winter) 50.1%— 1947 (Summer) 53.3% 
—1948 (Winter) 54.2%. 

Ask Free and Peters! 




CBS • 5000 WATTS • 960 K 

Owned and Operated by the 
TIMES-WORLD CORPORATION 

ROANOKE, VA 

FREE & PETERS. INC.. National Representatives 



NOVEMBER 1948 



101 



SPONSOR 




SPEAKS 



It's Murder 

There was a time when one juicy radio 
murder would suffice for the evening. But 
judging by the current crop of homicidal 
programs, it's quantity that counts today. 
Not only is the total of murder broadcasts 
at a high ebb, but apparently the scripter 
who fails to do away with at least three 
homo sapiens per stanza stands to be 
blackballed from the Guild. 



We suppose the average listener likes 
all this, judging by the ratings. But we 
welcome the day when the inevitable 
shift from wholesale murder to wholesome 
entertainment occurs. 



Selective 

With this issue sponsor, in collabora- 
tion with eight of its contemporaries in 
the advertising trade paper field, changes 
from spot to selective. Henceforth that 
segment of broadcast advertising pur- 
chased and used on a market-by-market 
basis will be termed selective. On some 
occasions the usage will be lengthened to 
selective radio, on others to selective TV. 

The reasoning behind the shift is aired 
on page 33 of this issue, and has been 
aired in several preceding issues. In 
brief, our objective from the start was to 
do something to eliminate the confusion 
caused by the double connotation of the 
word spot in broadcast advertising circles. 
Spot will continue to mean announce- 
ments, station breaks, singing commer- 
cials — all the short shorts. Selective will 
be the overall term. 

A transition of this sort isn't easy. But 
with a right objective, and the teamwork 
of nearly all of the advertising trade press, 
we think the job will be done. In last 
analysis, it's usage that will decide how 
fast the new name catches on. 



SPONSOR goes biweekly 

Of all the advertising media, the tempo 
of radio and television is fastest. Devel- 
opments crowd in day after day, shifting 
with the speed of light. 

It was this scene that sponsor entered, 
a fledgling monthly for buyers of broad- 
cast advertising, two years ago. And its 
growth has paralleled the growth of the 
medium. 

As it approached its third year, 
sponsor felt the necessity of stepping up 
its factual content to keep pace with 
broadcast advertising. A biweekly oper- 
ation seemed logical. But did sponsor's 
readers want it? First came a door-to- 
door inquiry. Throughout the month of 
August sponsor's publisher, editor and 
staff visited agene'es, advertisers, sta- 
tions, and station representatives. They 
liked the idea ... it would give them 
better article coverage, a shorter span 
between issues, facts behind trade news 
while it is still news. 

In September a postcard survey was 
The question: "Shall sponsor go bi- 
weekly?" The response was 2 1 -i to 1 in 
favor of the move. 

So, effective with the issue of 3 January 
1949, sponsor will appear every second 
Monday. 

With this announcement goes a prom- 
ise. Sponsor's content, direction, format 
will continue as before. We will not 
become a trade newsmagazine. 




Applause 



■""" -* 




SPREADING THE GOOD WORD 



Eighteen months ago sponsor proposed to the broadcast 
industry that an intensive campaign to explain that "broad- 
cast advertising pays" was necessary. The entire publication 
thesis of sponsor is based upon the premise that the more an 
advertiser knows about the broadcast advertising forms the 
mmi they become effective mediums for him. While a year 
and a half ago the industry collectively wasn't prepared to 
carry the torch forradio'scommercial effectiveness, since that 
time individually, networks, the station representatives, and 
a numbei of stations have begun to focus their promotion upon 
the sales aspect of broadcasting. 

Currently the industry campaign to sell broadcast advertis- 
ing to top management in all fields is well undei way. The 
inertia whi< h first met sponsor's suggestion for a t'nited cam- 
paign to tell advertising just what broadcasting can do, has 
be< n disturbed. A great deal of constructive industry think- 
ng is behind campaigns to spread the word of what broad- 



casting can do, when used intelligently. Recently our con- 
temporary, Broadcasting, surveyed stations on their reactions 
to the All-Industry presentation on broadcast advertising and 
reported that 959? of the nation's stations realize that educa- 
tion of the advertising industry on radio and television is 
essential. Broadcasting is now also canying the torch which 
lights up the truth of Broadcast Advertising Pays. 

Spreading the word that broadcast advertising pays is a 
big job and one that requires the teamwork of all the publica- 
tions in the field of advertising and sales. Sponsor never 
pictured itself as the sole protagonist for broadcast advertis- 
ing. Just as in the case of its fight for a new name foi "spot," 
sponsor wants to submerge its identity in an industry- 
wide effort. 

There really is advertising magic in broadcasting, and we're 
happy indeed that 95% of the industry believes that the good 
word must be spread . . . and is doing something about it. 



102 



SPONSOR 



Time - on - the - Air 
Isn't All ! 



WllQt happens when a manufacturer or his 
agent comes to WLW with a sales problem? If 
it's at all possible, he gets help. And help through 
time-on-the-air is by no means all. 

At The Nation's Station, this fact has long been 
recognized: advertising alone is seldom the com- 
plete answer to a sales problem. So WLWs ser- 
vice to advertisers goes much deeper. With a 
"know-how" peculiar to the area — and with un- 
rivaled facilities — WLW can help smooth out 
problems of distribution, selling appeal, packag- 
ing, dealer and consumer attitude and other 
factors which must be right if advertising is to 
be fully effective. 

Here's a Case history: Several years 
ago, a small local manufacturer came to 
WLW. Distribution was limited in Cincinnati 
— light and spotty in WLWs 4-state area. A 
distribution campaign, conducted by WLWs 
Specialty Sales division, was followed by a 
modest schedule of spot announcements. 
Recommendations were made on packaging, 
selling appeal, display and supplemental 
media. WLWs Merchandising Department 
helped secure dealer acceptance and store 
display. 

The result? Sales increased and expansion 
followed. In this area, the product is now the 
largest seller in a highly competitive field. 
The manufacturer is also one of WLW's larg- 



est and most consistent advertisers . . . the 
reason, we believe, why "radio advertising" 
was given as the factor which influenced pur- 
chases among nearly 70%of the product users, 
in a recent survey of WLW's consumer panel. 

Further, this advertiser has followed the same 
basic formula in other sections of the country 
... so successfully that two additional plants 
have been established to supply the sales 
demand. 

The lessons and experience you may learn in 
WLW-Land will apply for all the nation. For the 
WLW Merchandise-Able Area is a true cross- 
section of America, an ideal proving ground for 
new ideas, products packages and techniques. 

Yes, the nearly 14 million people who live in 
WLW-Land mirror America. And with its un- 
equalled facilities — its man power and "know- 
how". WLW can help you learn how to reach 
them . . . and sell them. 



( ) 

THE NATION'S MOST MERCHANDISE-ABLE STATION 







MORE 

LISTENERS 

PER DOLLAR 



• Cleveland's Chief Station gives 
sponsors complete co-operation . . . 
combines programming and promo- 
tion to deliver more listeners per dollar 
than any other Cleveland station. Take 
full advantage of this dominating cov- 
erage. Gear your sales and advertising 
plans accordingly! 



BASIC 

ABC Network 



Bill O'NEIl, President 




CLEVELAND 



850 KC 

5000 Watts 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY HEADLEY-REED COMPANY 



EMBER 1948 • 50c a copy 



Why sponsors shift networks— p. 21 

P&G sponsors a TV fashion show— p. 29 

Sales managers' lament— p. 32 

Ups & downs in selective radio— p. 62 

1947 version: Smith Brothers in the Trade & Mark tradition — p. 24 





The modern-day magic carpet is television. 

Through the air it glides, enchanting whole cities, 
captivating every member of the family. 

In Richmond the magic carpet is WTVR, 
"the South's first television station." 

Via the NBC Television Network WTVR brings the 
entertainment delights of distant regions to its 
viewers; just as its sisters, AM station WMBG 
and FM station WCOD, are delivering NBC favorites 
to Virginia listeners. 

Small wonder that Havens and Martin Stations 
are a habit throughout their area. 




\AFMBG am 
WTVR tv 
WCOD fm 



&fadf *-ffafamA iff ^ts/jyr'/Hti 



Havens and Martin Stations, Richmond 20, Va. 
John Blair & Company, National Representatives 
Affiliates of National Broadcasting Company 





TS.. .SPONSOR REPORTS. . 



OVER 1,000 
MANUFACTURERS 
SHARING RETAIL 
RADIO COSTS 



FOOD AD-DOLLARS 
PRODUCING MORE 
SALES IN 1948 



CLEVELAND LEADS 
IN TV SET SALES 
FOR ITS SIZE 
AREA 



CBS LOVES 
BING 



DIVIDENDS 
CONTINUE UP, 



ELECTION 
SPONSORS 
GET RADIO'S 
GREATEST 
BONUS 



BAKING INDUSTRY 
MAKES RADIO 
PLANS 



..SPONSOR REPORT 



December 1948 

Although NAB's report on cooperative dealer advertising reported 
over 330 firms sharing dealers' costs of advertising product of 
manufacturers (usually on 50-50 basis), actual count indicates total 
paying part or all of dealer's broadcasts nearer 1,000. NAB relied 
upon stations reporting and in many cases stations do not know if 
program cost is shared or not. 

-SR- 

Food sales per advertising dollar are currently 73% ahead of 1942, 
it is reported by Art Nielsen of A. C. Nielsen research organiza- 
tion. In same report Nielsen points out that retail food stock in- 



ventories are very low and that gross profits for independent 
grocers for 33 food products research-checked by his organization 
were off 3.3%, from 1947. 

-SR- 

Even before WNBK (NBC's owned and operated TV station in Cleveland) 
hit air, Cleveland was selling television sets faster, in relation 
to its population, than any other area. With WEWS operating alone, 
first nine months of 1948 indicated a minimum of 16,572 sets sold. 

-SR- 

WCBS' acceptance of "This Is Bing Crosby," Minute Maid Frozen Orange 
Juice transcribed program, only commercial recording scheduled for 
many a moon, is just another instance of how CBS is going all out to 
show what it could do for Philco evening Crosby program, if it were 
on CBS. 

-SR- 

Cash dividends for the third quarter of 1948 were up 14% over 1947 
with SI, 385, 300, 000 being disbursed this year against $1,217,200,000 

last year. 



-SR- 

Sponsors of network and TV election night returns received greatest 
bonus ever presented to advertiser in history of broadcasting. No 
sponsor received less than 100% ; more time than he had expected and 
several reached several hundred times their expected audiences. One 
chain received bid for sponsorship of next presidential election on 
TV and radio on 3 November, voting day plus one. 

-SR- 

American Bakers Association is planning network public relations 
program for members. Broadcast will have twofold objective - tell- 
ing story of bakery foods and baking industry's attitude on national 
questions while current. 






SPONSOR. VoL 3. No. 2. December I!)'i8. Published monthly by Sponsor Publications Inc. Publication offices: 5800 V. Marcint St.. Philadelphia 'it. Pa. Advertising. Kdili 
iat. and Circulation offices. ¥) W. 52 •*>(., New York 19. N. Y. Acceptance under the act of June 5. I93'i at Philadelphia. Pennsylvania, authorized December •}. 19'i7 



DECEMBER 1948 



REPORTS... SPONSOR RE PORTS. .. SPONSOR R 



RESEARCH 
SUFFERING 



TV VIEWING 
CONTINUES UP 



RURAL RADIO 
NET EXPANDS 
BEYOND N. Y, 



SET SALE 

PROFITS 

INCREASE 



52 WEEK PROGRAM 
SCHEDULE MAY 
BE NETWORK 
REALITY 



NO GIVE-AWAY 
REGULATIONS 
IN DECEMBER? 



INDEPENDENT 
STATION PACKAGE 
DEAL STILL 
IN WORKS 



While practically all opinion-research organizations lost few 
clients due to election polling fiasco, there is no record of 
any quantitative radio research organization receiving cancella- 
tions. Qualitative radio researching, especially those doing "pre- 
testing" of programs and commercials signed no new contracts during 
November, and in several cases lost clients. 

-SR- 

Metropolitan New York, which is still bellwether for what's going to 
happen when "everyone" has TV as well as radio set, had straw-in- 
the-wind report from Pulse, Inc., during November. Sets-in-use 
figures for TV-Radio homes for New York for August, September, 
October were released during month. They were: 

Combined TV-Radio TV only Radio only 
August 1948 30.2 20.2 11.7 

September 1948 33.0 23.5 11.1 

October 1948 33.5 24.1 10.8 

These figures were for "average quarter hour sets in use for entire 
week, noon to midnight." 

-SR- 

Farm coverage is joining transit radio and storecasting as possible 
special service for FM stations. Although original plans of Rural 
Radio Network call for New York State network, stations in Connecti- 
cut and Massachusetts are being added. Since no telephone lines are 
used for connecting chain, low cost operations are possible. 

-SR- 

Most radio set manufacturers are reporting higher gross and net in- 
comes, with an important part of their income coming from TV set 
sales. RCA's first nine months showed net of $15,128,783 as against 
$12,233,758 for the same period in 1947. Philco reported $6,631,000 
against $5,632,000 in 1947 despite increased reserve for "inventory 
control . " 

-SR- 

Despite union opposition all four networks will have more programs 
on 52 week basis in 1949 than ever before. Since networks are will- 
ing to make special payments for non-star performers used in repeats 
of midseason shows via transcriptions there isn't much unions can do 
about it. 

-SR- 

Regulations on give-away programs which were expected in December 
may not be handed down until well into new year. FCC would like to 
issue stringent rules "for good of industry" but don't like its de- 
cision being appealed to the courts, which it will be if tough. 

-SR- 

Plans for "package deal," whereby sponsors will be able to purchase 
sectional and eventually national coverage of all important markets 
through number of non-network stations being sold with one contract 
and one invoice, are moving slowly. 'Need of lining up key inde- 
pendents that are accustomed to going it alone has delayed deal. 



SPONSOR 




(J) Since 1922 
( fy Since June 1947 
li^l Under Construction 



Represented by 
the K a 1 1 Agency 




RvJODELfNO and mwlifieaiwaj-of the 
re in Oklahoma Oiiy's Municipal Auditorium 
Ts neat -ly Complete, V iUIkhl-MuI W KY-TV r operations . . . 
New mohih'T^i^^rin be mos^^ijftipfete and elaborate 
in industry; installation of equipment nearly 
completed . . . WKY-TV antenna, atop WKY's 915-foot 
AM antenna, will be the highest structurally supported 
TV antenna in the world . . . Exclusive contracts have been 
signed to telecast all University of Oklahoma football 
and basketball games, professional wrestling matches and 
midget auto races . . . Engineering, production and 
programming staffs are drilling and rehearsing . . . When 
\\ KY-TV goes on the air early in 1949, it will be television 
at its best, up to the established high standards of 
W k i ... It's not too early to make reservations for time 
on Oklahoma City's first television station. \\ KY-TV 
on the air early in 1949. 



Owned and Operated by The Oklahoma Publishing Company: 
The OKLAHOHAN and Times — ■ The Farmer-Stockman — KVOR, 
Colorado Sprincs and KLZ, Denver (Affiliated Management) 



DECEMBER 1948 



flL * »■ 



1 WS» 



%&l ^ 



SPONSOR REPORTS 


1 


40 WEST 52ND 


4 


ON THE HILL 


10 


MR. SPONSOR 


12 


P.S. 


14 


NEW AND RENEW 


17 


WHY SPONSORS CHANGE NETWORKS 


21 


RADIO SELLS COUGH DROPS 


24 


CRASHING FARM CIRCLE 


26 


P&G BUYS TV STYLE SHOW 


29 


SALES MANAGERS' LAMENT 


32 


GREETING CARDS ON AIR 


34 


MR. SPONSOR ASKS 


36 


TV RESULTS 


38 


SELECTIVE TRENDS 


62 


4-NETWORK COMPARAGRAPH 


67 


TV TRENDS 


76 


SIGNED AND UNSIGNED 


80 


SPONSOR SPEAKS 


86 


APPLAUSE 


86 




Published monthly by sponsor publications inc. Executive, 
Editorial, and Advertising Offices: 40 West 52 Street, New 
York 19. N. Y. Telephone: I'laza 3- 021 G. Chicago Office: 1 300 N. 
Michigan Ave., Telephone Financial 1556. Publication Offices: 
6800 North Marvinc Street, Philadelphia 41, Pa. Subscrip- 
5"i a year; Canada $5.50. Single copies 50c. 
Printed in U. S. A. Copyright 1948 SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC 




COVER I'K 'I l l:l Toda ' Sn ithBrothere (William W. Smith 
II and Robert I. Smith) phow how they would have lo 

l founded the coughdrop firm. If fogrow 

the chin adornment. 



400 West 52nd 



WRONG BISHOP 

In your very interesting article Religion 

Learns to Use the Air, in the November 

1948 issue, there was a flaw, which in the 

interests of accuracy, I know you will 

wish to correct. The identifying caption 

of the picture on page 40 reads "Bishop 

Sherrill and Walter Abel interviewed at 

Great Plays opening." Instead of Bishop 

Sherrill, the caption should read Bishop 

De Wolfe of Long Island, as the picture 

was taken in Cathedral House, Garden 

City, L. I. on the occasion of Bishop 

James Permette De Wolfe's reception for 

the stars Celeste Holm and Walter Abel 

following the recording of Dark Victory. 

Philip Kerby 

Publicity Director 

H. B. Humphrey Co., 

N. Y. 



AGENCY LAMENT 

Your story on Station Managers' 
Lament was read very carefully at the 
agency. Several points were well made 
and will lead to some revisions in our own 
practices. However, I believe a major 
point which militates against stations is 
the original approach they use either 
through a sales rep or a member of the 
station executive staff. 

Agencies know that stations cannot 
spend too much time and /or money on 
network show promotion. I doubt 
whether many agencies actually expect a 
particular show or shows to receive much 
personal time and attention. Why, then, 
do stations insist on blowing their horns 
so loudly about what terrific promotional 
jobs they do for agencies and shows? 

The station oversells. The agency 
calls its bluff. The station backs out. 
Result: Pique on the part of agency and 
station. Let the stations try a little low 
pressure work from now on and some of 
the pressure would be lifted from their 
shoulders. 

When an agency has a really special 
promotion, something which would be 
good for everybody, the station should 
make an effort to handle same. This 
holds true, I believe, especially where a 
show has run for a number of years and 
consistently delivered audiences for the 
station. It doesn't happen often, un- 
fortunatelj , 

Additionally, agencies are in receipt of 
many a bound piece of literature with one 
radio spot enclosed as evidence that a 

(Please turn to page 6) 



Listeners 
Are a Dime 
a Dozen 

...in Do/far Rich 
Pittsburgh 



That is. when you buy them on 
Pittsburgh's Major Independ- 
ent. WWSW! 

A 1 6 year long listening- 
habit, plus more sports, 
more news, more music, 
more special events will 
bring you a consistently 
higher percentage of the 
Pittsburgh audience for 
every cent spent! 

Right now, the RIG buy is 
the bright new afternoon-long 
"Melody-go-Round" — open 
for a limited number of an- 
nouncements every afternoon, 
Monday through Friday from 
1 to 5 o'clock. Four hours of 
uninterrupted melody that is 
bringing substantial reaction, 
indicating a strong feminine 
listenership, day in and day out ! 

Join the throng of na- 
tional* and local adver- 
tisers who KNOW that 
it PAYS to use 




PITTSBURGH'S 

Major Independent 

WWSW, Inc. 
Sheraton Hotel, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

*Ask For joe 




Here in the prosperous corn-and-wheat 
belt, Mid-America's grocery bill last 
year was well over a billion dollars. In 
Kansas City alone, the average KCMO 
listener-buyer spent $793 in food stores for her family. 
Naturally, most of this food spending is done by women 
. . . and Mid-America women listen to KCMO . . . 
because they like KCMO's daytime schedule of 
woman-interest programs. Careful attention to woman- 
appeal programming means your food product advertis- 
ing on KCMO gets an extra chance to increase your 
share of the Mid-America grocery bill. 
To sell Mid-America's women . . . center your selling 
on KCMO. 

50,000 WATTS DAYTIME-Non-Direcfiono/ 

10,000 WATTS NIGHT-siofcc. 

National Representative: JOHN E. PEARSON COMPANY 

data from 1947 Sales Management Survey 
of Buying Power 



£^, 



OmDm/t-in/Wd-fherica! 




MID-AMERICA FACTS 

Population: 5,435,091 

Area: 213 counties inside 50,000 watt measured V2 
millivolt area. Mail response from 466 counties 
(shaded on map) in six states, plus 22 other states 
not tabulated. 

Population Distribution: Farm, 48%; city, suburban, 
and small town, 52%. 

Net Average Income: $3334 per family. 

Net Average Income Per Family in Nine Major Cities: 
$5606.* 

Food Sales— 9 Major Cities: $446,273,000 

Total Mid-America Food Sales: $1,182,227,000' 

KCMO 

and KCFM...94.9 Megacycles 
KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI 

Basic ABC for Mid- America 






ONE station • ONE set of call letters 
ONE rate card • O NE spot on the dial 



DECEMBER 1948 




NOW ! - 

television 

FOR THE WCH 
TRADING AREAI 

•, November 24, **•» 
WA VE-TV went on the a.r ^ .„ d n 

tow n Lou.sv.Ue, and ^ lotalg 41 J 

combined expeneoee 



el 5. 



-nleen honrs per wee "V 
W e are now t^eeasUug severe sports , and 

feuding eig" ^"JcUereiaV —— 
ffi „re than two Hon 

lt ed «»«» bo '" '..., hv Free & 



joth NBC and ABC 
affi, rl represented bv " 



Televis» oU 



Networks 



^■SS, KENTUCKY 



CHANNEL 5 

PETERS, INC 




N „«)HrU REPRESENTEES 



10 West 52nd 

continued from page 4 



station has been promoting a program for 
60 or 90 days. That type of evidence is 
more annoying than comforting. It 
would he better to keep the spot at home. 

We don't blame stations for not coming 
in on promotions. We do say they should 
be honest about the situation and not 
write a series of "hail fellow well met" 
letters indicating they are going to do 
something, when we know (and they 
know) they're not. 

Stations might remember that most of 
us have worked for networks and stations 
at one time or another. We, too, can de- 
tect the tongue-in-cheek and the empty 
gesture. 

As for prizes for all, some time ago we 
i ilk-red cash to stations carrying one of our 
programs. Any station could get the 
money to either pay for a single promo- 
tion stunt or help pay for a stunt built 
around the program. Well, quite a few 
stations asked for the money and came 
through with good stunts. Many did not. 
The question is: What will make a station 
do a promotion if cash won't? 

We happen to think shows can be made 
by local station effort. We are constantly 
working for better relationships with the 
stations and are willing to help them out 
as much as possible and wherever possible. 
Incidentally, publicity departments some- 
times have a hand in helping to pick sta- 
tions for campaigns. We know which 
stations produce good promotions and 
have no hesitation in recommending them 
when the matter is broached — as it is 
many times during the year. 

The problem is a knotty and important 
one. Perhaps network promotion heads, 
agency radio publicity heads and station 
representatives could sit down somewhere 
and thrash it out with a view toward 
setting up some kind of working arrange- 
ment which would satisfy all sides. 

From our side of the fence, we're per- 
fectly happy to forward good station 
promotion to the clients and bring it to 
the attention of our account executives. 

I refuse to believe the statement which 
a station manager made to me some time 
ago. "Hal," he said brightly, "we'll do 
everything we can to help you — except 
work!" 

Hal Davis 
Publicity Director 
Kenyon & Eckhardt 
N. Y. 



(Please turn to page 44) 



SPONSOR 



Emmet County is part of 



• • • 




IOWA 



SO IS 



Big Aggie 



Sam \<ki>. the winner! 



I capacity croud packed the ha 1 ! park to •.<■<■ the II \ I \ 
Missouri Valley Horn Dance. 



Nothin' likr a celebration. Estherville's 
biggest took place October .l when Sam Naas, 
winner in Iowa of the WNAX 5-state Farm- 
stead Improvement Program, was presented 
$1,000 iii merchandise. 

Like this young Emmet county farmer, 1,043 
other entrants from 203 counties have made 
substantial "Farmstead Improvements" — in- 
spired by this WNAX-inaugurated 3-year 
program. A notable example of hov> \\ N \\ 
continues — Serving the Midwest Farmer! 




Ask a 
Katz man 



It I 

SIOUX CITY * YANKTON *«!»«»• WITH THE AMERICAN BROADCASTING CO. 



DECEMBER 1948 




The empty studio • • • 




No voice is heard now. The music is still. The studio audience has gone home. 

But the work of the broadcast has just begun. All through the week . . . between broadcasts . . . 
people everywhere are buying the things this program has asked them to buy. Week after week. 

From the beginning, the country's shrewdest advertisers have chosen network radio 
to maintain this weekly contact with then- customers. 

And in all radio, no voice speaks today with more eloquent authority or economy than 
that of CBS -first choice, among all networks, of America's largest advertisers. 

THE COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 





Advertising Allowances Must Be Watched 

Enforcement of the Robinson-Patman Act, which has been lax 
during the past 18 months, will be tougher after the first of the 
year. As business conditions become tighter, more independent 
merchants start complaining about "special" discounts and 
advising allowances which they claim are given "the other 
fellow." Innumerable cases where broadcast advertising allow- 
ances have been paid for one dealer and not given another are 
said to be on record. 



Excess Profits Taxes to Increase Ad-budgets 

Increased excess profit taxes, which seem assured next year, are 
already producing some advertising budgets that are bigger 
than they were a year ago. Corporations fear that amount of 
money they spend for advertising won't be permitted to jump 
radically when higher excess profits taxes go into effect. Taxes 
must, say tax experts, increase to at least 50% and there's a 
fair chance that in some brackets they may be set at 60-70%. 
Organizations feel certain that it's better business to spend the 
"excess" earnings in advertising than taxes. 

Social Security Benefits Up 

Increased social security benefits will release a certain amount 
of buying by over-60's who have been watching their nest' 
eggs carefully. Social Security benefits are expected to go up 
about 50% and the starting age to shift from its current 65 
to 60. 



Banks Increase Advertising Plans 

Banks are due for a blast by President Truman who feels that 
they have done nothing to hold back inflation. As a pre- 
cautionary measure a few more advertising dollars will be 
spent by "big" banks throughout the country to "tell" the 
bankers' side of the story. Washington is in a position, through 
the Federal Reserve setting certain interest rates, to make 
banks sweat. 



Farmers Are Smiling 

Farm subsidies, which were held to be in question under a 
Dewey presidency, are now certain to be continued. Farm 
market will therefore receive increasingly more attention during 
1949, from advertisers. 



"Musts" Take Over 50% of Consumer Dollar 

Groceries, direct taxes, apparel and housing, in that order will 
take over 50% of the 1948 estimated per-capita consumer ex- 
penditure during 1948. Groceries alone, according to the 
Bureau of Census, will take 21.9% of all the consumer spends. 
Cost of food will increase, so apparel expenditure is expected 
to decrease in 1949. Apparel took 8.5% of all monies spent 
by U. S. consumers in 1948. 



Tax for TV Bars? 

Looking for tax sources may bring the extension of the 20% 
entertainment tax to bars and grills with TV receiver installa- 
tions. Court decision in State of Washington, that even a 
juke box is entertainment, if a place to dance is made avail- 
able, is a straw-in-the-wind. When all the entertainment 
unions together couldn't stop the 20% tax for regular night- 
clubs, there doesn't seem much chance for TV, equipped bars. 
However, a fund of many thousands has been raised to fight 
the tax and it won't "slip" through without a well publicized 
yell. 

Another P. 0. Rate Increase? 

Postal rates, which jump in certain classifications after the first 
of the year, are due for another jump which will hit second class 
entry publications as well as all organizations using other than 
first class mail. Stepbrother treatment, which other than first 
class material is receiving currently, is just part of the cam- 
paign. P. O. wants to be self supporting, since this will make 
it easier to give the boys in grey some more money, which 
nearly everyone thinks is overdue. 

Richards' Station Case to Point FCC Attitude 

Radio industry is watching what action the Federal Communi- 
cations Commission will take on the charges that the Richards 
stations KMPC, WGAR, and WJR "slanted" news. Reason 
for the close watch is not that Frank Mullen (ex-NBC and now 
Richards stations' president) will he handling the defense, but 
the feeling that the FCC decision will indicate just how tough 
the Commission plans to be for the next four years. 

Washington Has Renewed Importance 

With Truman really in the saddle for the next four years, big 
corporations are laying plans for a far more intensive watch- 
dog operations in the Capital. No plans, they feel, will be 
good, without a clean-cut idea of what the new New-Deal 
will do. 



"Basing Point" Hits National Advertisers 

National advertisers are fighting recent decisions of the Federal 
Trade Commission forcing price setting on an f.o.b. basis and 
prohibiting absorption of freight costs. Business' recent 
tendency (pre-new basing point ruling) to establish a retail one- 
price system throughout the United States will have to be 
forgotten if the f.o.b. ruling stands. 

This will force local cut-ins on every network program using 
price-mentions. More and more price appeal copy is being 
broadcast and network traffic men worry about the day when 
50% of all programs may have regional cut-in announcements. 



10 



SPONSOR 




M LA_M /. FLORIDA 






DECEMBER 1948 



11 






MORE 

People in this Billion Dollar Retail 
Sales Area listen to WPTF Than To 
Any Other Station! 




WPTF dominates all competition at all 
times. That's the report of the 1948 
LISTENER DIARY STUDY. (Con- 
ducted by Audience Surveys, Inc. in 
WPTF's 62 counties with 50% or better, 
day and night, BMB coverage.) 



Findings include sets-in 
use, station ratings, 
share-oraudience flow 
and composition by 
quarter hours. 




Rep. FREE & PETERS, Inc. 




Mr. Sponsor 



Holier I >l. (pray 

Manager, Advertising-Sales Promotion 
Esso Standard Oil Company, New York 



Bob Gray had been with Esso* for just a year when the giant oil firm 
opened up the entire field of sponsored selective newscasts with the Esso 
Reporter in October, 1935. Prior to that, the wire services had been 
jealously refusing to sell news coverage to radio. The Esso deal changed 
all that. Hoosier-born Gray has followed in that pattern of new adver- 
tising wrinkles in the past 14 years. Gray and Esso were experimenting 
in TV as early as 1939 with telecast news on NBC. The TV know-how 
he gathered in those "early" days is paying dividends now. Esso's one- 
minute TV film announcements, seen in eight TV markets in the 18'State 
sales area of Esso Standard Oil, are among the best in video advertising. 

Esso Standard Oil is just one of the many affiliated and subsidiary 
companies of that granddaddy of the oil industry, Standard Oil Company 
(N. J.) but it sets the advertising and sales pace for the other members 
of Standard's far-flung family. It sells its products in states from Maine 
to South Carolina, and in Tennessee, Arkansas, and Louisiana, and 
accounts for a fair percentage of the $2,354,916,766 gross operating 
income Standard had last year. 

At least half of the $2,000,000 plus advertising budget Gray has been 
spending in 1948 was earmarked for one of several forms of broadcast 
advertising. The rest went for outdoor, publication and direct mail 
media. Esso air selling in 1948, under Gray's jurisdiction, included the 
Esso Reporter on 42 stations, film announcements on eight TV stations, 
and the U. of Arkansas football games (in a deal with Standard's Texas 
offshoot, Humble Oil) on Arkansas' Razorback Networks. Gray fre- 
quently urges Esso dealers to use radio on their own, sends them gratis 
air copy and e.t.'s, and reports more than 475 buy air time now. 

Esso's sprawling parent, Standard Oil Company (N. J.), bought the 
New York Philharmonic recently on 164 CBS stations to do a national 
institutional job for itself and member firms. However, Gray and Esso 
Standard have worked out a lend-lease deal by which 18 Esso Reporter 
shows (on CBS stations) plug the symphony on Saturday nights. In 
return, Esso products get a cut-in plug on some 54 CBS stations carrying 
the symphony in Esso territory. Gray makes even low-pressure adver- 
tising do .i selling job for his firm. 



/ o Standard wot formerly called Standard Oil < <■ of %<•"■ Jersey . 
with Oif /hin nf tirm, tin name wot changed m February^ t948, 



1 fter yean <<f l>rtn>i confused 



12 



SPONSOR 



listener 



Post war radio has seen many 
changes in listener trends. A good 
example of this is the recent survey 
made in the North Dakota market. 
Station KSJB (Columbia) with studios 
in Jamestown and Fargo now leads all 
others two to one. But why? 

There are two answers. The first is 
programming. KSJB takes full advan- 
tage of Columbia's shows. Then, every 
local show is designed to satisfy local 
tastes and "build" to the network. 
There are no abrupt changes of pace. 
The switch from "folk music" to 



ADVERTISEMENT 

symphony is gradual and with respect 
for the mood of the listener. An im- 
portant factor in maintaining audience 
and yet satisfying a mass market. 

The second reason for KSJB's re- 
markable gain is power. With 5000 
watts unlimited, at 600 Kilocycles, plus 
remarkable ground conductively, they 
can be easily heard throughout the 
tri'State, 94 county market. 

These are the reasons why more 
people listen to KSJB. . . . They can 
hear KSJB . . . and they like what 
they hear. 



CBS Leads in North Dakota with KSJB 5,000 Watts Unlimited 

8:00 8:15 8:30 8:45 9:00 9:15 9:30 9:45 10:00 10:15 10:30 10:45 11:0011:15 11:30 11:45 12:00 

A.M. A.M. A.M. A.M. NOON 







1 
STATION 


1 1 
'A" FARGO 






















STATION "B" BISMARCK 




















— • KSJB JAMESTOWN & FARGO 


































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This survey was based on 1780 calls made in seven key North Dakota counties by Conlan Radio Reports. Other periods 
were also studied with the same results. KSJB led all the way. In the " Distribution of listening homes among stations" 
KSJB led by 54.4 mornings, 46.5 afternoons and 49.6 evenings, a better than two to one lead over all other stations. 
For complete details ask your Geo. Hollingbery representative to see the latest survey ... he has availabilities too. 



KSJB 



with Studios in Fargo and Jamestown 



/?&&& 




New developments on SPONSOR stories 



'Give that 



s 



ponsor.. 



I" 



A COMPARISON of Rhode Island net- 
work-station rates shows the sponsor on 
the receiving end when he specifies 
\\ I CI . . . for here's complete coverage 
at considerably lower cost . . . releasing 
dollars for duty where the going is 
tougher. 

Current rates of the three com- 
peting 5000-watt full-time stations 
show for a five-a-week one-minute 
spot 26-week schedule — ■ 

STATION "A" 13% Higher 
STATION "B" 16*$% Higher 
STATION "C" 59% Higher 



THE LOW COST NETWORK 

STATION IN RHODE ISLAND 

IS 




5000 WATTS 
DAY & NIGHT 



WALLACE A. WALKER, Gen. Mgr. 

PROVIDENCE, The Sheroton Biltmore 

PAWTUCKET, 450 Moin St. 



Raprti*nt»ttv*t: 

AVERY-KNODEL, INC. 



p.s 



See: "Petrillo Plans Ban Lifting" 

Iccno- October 1948, page 112 and p.s. November 
' 1948, page 20 

en the market? What is 



1948, page 20 

How soon will new records be 
the transcription picture? 



The recording ban is over — all except for the official blessing of the U. S. 
Department of Justice. This is no longer news to advertisers. What is 
news is the fact that all the disk manufacturers have plans ready for an 
intensive group of recording sessions in order to catch up on new tunes 
that have hit the best'Seller sheet-music lists since January of this year. 
The record business has been sorely hit by not having "hot" numbers on 
the dealers' racks. Recent consumer buying has been for necessities, and 
while a hit tune on wax is frequently judged a must for recorded-music 
fans, anything short of the current rage goes begging. Lack of new music 
on disks has also prevented disk jockeys from startling the nation with 
their favorite tunes over independent stations. Regular platter com- 
mentators at stations have held their fallowings with ratings only easing 
off from a fraction of one index point. They have held listeners because 
of their personalities — proving that general thinking was incorrect in 
assuming that it was the disks not the jockeys which were responsible for 
the high listening to record music on local stations. 

There isn't too much enthusiasm over the ban lifting at most transcrip- 
tion organizations. There won't be any great rush of orders for custom- 
built musical transcriptions but there are a number of orders for e.t. 
announcements for disking. Music libraries will of course "freshen-up" 
their collections and will continue at pre-ban levels. 



p.s 



See: "Music Libraries Stress Commercial Programing" 
ISSUd October 1948, page 41 

To what central source can a sponsor go for data on e.t. 
musical library shows? 



It's important to advertiser and agency that they can go to a single source 
for information on the number and quality of transcribed musical library 
shows available for sponsorship. Through their program research service, 
the Paul H. Raymer Company, New York, is now set up to provide data 
on kinds and quantities of music; production; program scripts; promotion 
aids for library-built shows. 

In addition, the Raymer service is compiling information on the selling 
records of transcribed library shows sponsored on Raymer stations. The 
facts are available to anyone interested. 

Not only the management of library service disks and equipment but 
of the entire station disk library calls for a librarian with know-how if 
the station is to avoid headaches, mishaps' and lost dollars in utilizing its 
musical resources. To provide the necessary training of librarians at no 
cost to its stations, Broadcast Music, Inc., the industry's own music 
licensing organization, has just started a series of two-day model library 
courses, given in its New York headquarters. 

Transcribed music for backgrounds, etc., has already become so im- 
portant to television stations that Associated Program Service, Inc. has 
built a special television library of some 2,000 disks which 27 of the 43 
stations on the air. as this story went to press, are now using. The 
library costs $75 per month (two year minimum contract) and at present 
the contract contains no escalator clauses. A station may feed the music 
to a network without extra cost to any station whose affiliates are Asso- 
ciated subscribers. Associated provides 2t lice replacements (breakage, 
wear and tear, etc.) a year, plus 25 new disks monthly which a program 
managei ma\ select either from the firm's catalogue or the regular monthly 
releases. 



14 



SPONSOR 



■■■ 



it's easy, 



IF YOU 
KNOW HOW! 



Okipping the obvious puns about "bull," we'd just like to 
say that running a big-time radio station in the deep South 
requires some pretty fancy stepping which only experience can 
teach. 

KWKH has experience. For 23 years we've been working 
to take the guesswork out of programming — to put Know-How 
in! We know about Dixie devotion to tradition, and we know 
the progressive outlook, too. . . . We know our listeners' social 
and economic picture. We know what they want to hear, 
and when. 

What's the result? Well, of all the rated CBS stations in the 
country, Hooper ranks KWKH 10th in the morning, 9th in the 
evening. If you really want to boost sales in this prosperous, 
four-state area, write us for all the facts! 




KWKH 



50,000 Watts 



DECEMBER 1948 



CBS 



SHREVEPORTf LOUISIANA 



Arkansas 
Mississippi 



The Branham Company 
Representatives 



Henry Clay, General Manager 



15 




16 



SPONSOR 



I 



new and renew 



M m 



New National Selective Business 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT 



AGENCY 



STATIONS 



CAMPAIGN, start, duration 



American Chicle Co 
Bon Ami Co 



Chewing Gum 
Class Gloss 



Colgate-Palmolivc-I'eet, Inc. Colgate Dental 

Cream 
Gruen Watch Co Watches 

Lever Brothers Rayve Home 

(Pepsodent Div.) Permanent 

Vish-Kelvinator Corp 1949 Nash 

(Nash Motors Div.) 

National Dairy Products Corp Sealtest dairy 

products 



Old Dutch Coffee Co 
Personal Products Co 
RKO Radio Pictures 

Vick Chemical Co 



Coffee 

"Yes" tissues 

Movie: "Joan of 
Arc" 

Vick's VapoRuh 



Badger and Brown- 
ing & Hersey 

BBD&O 



led Bates 
Grey 

J. Walter Thompson 

(Chi.) 
Geyer, Newell & 

Canger 
N. W. Ayer 

Pock 
BBD&O 



25-50 

(Re-entering nikts used 

in summer 1948) 

2-3* 

(Test campaign. West Coast. 

New glass-cleaner) 

150-200* 

(Continuation of 1948 sched) 

Indef 
(Pre-Chrlstmas promotions) 

200-300 

(Natl campaign, major mkts) 

150-200* 



E.t. annemts, breaks; Jan 1; 13- 
wks 

E.t. anncmtS, breaks; Dec 1; 26 
wks 



Foote, Cone & 
Belding 

Morse 



E.t. annemts. breaks; Jan 1; 13-52 

wks 
E.t. annemts. breaks; Nov S-l>,-< 

15 (or later) 
E.t. annemts. breaks; Jan 1; 26 

wks 
E.t. annemts, breaks; Nov-Dec 
(Natl campaign for new models) starting dates; 6-8-13 wks 

50* Dorothy Dix (ABC co-op arrange- 

(ABC stas only. Dealer cut-ins ment) as sched MTWTF 1:45-2 
Five O&O stas not co-op) pm; Jan 3; 52 wks 

0-15 E.t. annemts; Nov starting dates 

13 wks 
E.t. annemts; Nov starting dates; 

13 wks 
E.t. annemts. breaks; from Nov 1 1 
on; 1-2 wks per campaign 



(Limited regional campaign) 

15* 

(Limited natl campaign) 

Indef 

(Intensive regional campaigns 

with roadshow dates) 

100* 

'Adding small stas in existing 

Vick major mkts) 



E.t. annemts; Dec 1; 6 wks 



*Station list set at present, although more may be added later. 

(Fifty-two weeks generally means a 13-week contract with options for 3 successive 13-week renewals. It's subject to cancellation at the end of any 13-week period) 



fl^y New and Renewed on Television (Network and Selective) 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET OR STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



American Tobacco Co 

(Lucky Strike) 
Elizabeth Ames Co. 

(Perfume atomizers) 
Anheuser-Busch. Inc 

(Budwelser Beer) 
Artistic Foundation Co 
Associated Lace Corp 
B. T. Babbitt. Inc 
A. S. Beck Shoe Corp 



Botany Worsted Mills 



V \V. Ayer 

Ray Hlrsch 

D'Arcy 

Hirshon -Garfield 
Ray Hlrsch 
Duane Jones 
Dorland 

Sllherstein-Goldsmith 



Brentwood Sportswear Co J. R. Kupsick 



Bristol-Myers Co 

(all acceptable prods) 
Bulova Watch Co 



BVD Corp 
Celomat Corp 

(Vu-Scope TV lens) 
Chevrolet Dealers of N. Y. 
Cluett. Peabody & Co Inc 
Conmar Products Corp 

(zippers) 
David Crystal. Inc 
Curtis Circulation Co 

Dan River Mills. Inc 
Egan Fickett & Co 

(Punch & Judy oranges) 



Florida Homesltes. Inc 
Ford Motor Co 



Doherty. Clifford & 

Shenfield 
Biow 



Grey 
Tracy-Kent 

Cambell-Ewald (N. Y.) 
Young & Rubicam 
William II. Welntrauh 



BBD&O 



John A. Cairns 
Moore & Hamm 



Flint 

Kenyon & Eckhardt 



WRGB. Schen. 
WPIX. N. Y. 
WJZ-TV, N. Y. 

KSD-TV, St. L. 

WJZ-TV. N. Y. 
WJZ-TV, N. Y. 
WCBS-TV. N. Y. 
WNBT. N. Y. 
WCBS-TV, N. Y. 
WXYZ-TV, Detr. 
KTLA. L. A. 
WBKB, Chi. 
WNBT, N. Y. 
WBZ-TV. Bost. 
WRGB. Schen. 
WJZ-TV. N. Y. 

WCN-TV, Chi. 
WNBT, N. Y. 
WMAL-TV, Wash. 
WGN-TV. Chi. 
WNBW. Wash 



WCBS-TV. N 
NBC-TV net 
WJZ-TV, N. V. 

WJZ-TV, N. Y. 
WBKB. Chi. 
KTLA. L. A. 
WJZ-TV, N. Y. 
WPIX. N. Y. 

WJZ-TV, N. V. 

WPIX. N. Y.l 
WBKB. Chi. 
K I I \ . L. A. 



\ . 



DECEMBER, 1941 

| ~— ~-~-~r~ 1 . r • v , 



Film annemts; Oct 15; 13 wks (n) 

Film annemts; Oct 25; 9 wks (r) 

Partic In "Fashion Story" ; Th betw 8-8:30 pm; Nov 4; 13 wks (n) 

Snapshots from Hollywood; 10-min as sched weekly; Nov 18; 

13 wks (n) 
Film annemts; Nov 12; 26 wks (n) 

Partic In "Fashion Story"; Th betw 8-8:30 pm; Nov 4; 13 wks (n) 
Missus Coes A-Shoppin'; Wed 1 :30-2 pm; Dec 8; 52 wks (r) 
Film annemts; Nov 5; 4 wks (n) 
Film annemts; Oct 22; 13 wks (n) 

Partic In "Lady of Charm"; Tu as sched; Nov 16; 13 wks (n) 
Weather annemts; Nov 8; 13 wks (r) 

Weather annemts; Nov 5; 2-wk test, continuing if effective (r) 
Weather annemts; Oct 29; 13 wks (n) 
Weather annemts; Oct 8; 13 wks (n) 
Film annemts; Oct 22; 52 wks (n) 

Time annemts; Oct 29; 13 wks (r) 
Time annemts; Oct 12; 25 wks (r) 
Time annemts; Nov 1; 52 wks (n) 
Film annemts; Nov 1 ; 13 wks (r) 
Film annemts; Oct 30; 6 wks (n) 

Film annemts; Nov 12; 13 wks (r) 

Phil Silvers; Wed 8:30-9 pm; Nov 24; 13 wks (n) 

Partic in "Fashion Story"; Th betw 8-S:30 pm; Nov 4; 13 wks (n) 

Partic in "Fashion Story"; Th betw 8-8:30 pin; \o\ 4; 13 «ks (n) 

Film annemts; Nov II (thereafter monthly for week of publica- 
tion of Ladies Home Journal); indef (n) 

Partic in "Fashion Story"; Th betw 8-8:30 pm; \..\ I. 13 wks (n) 

Partic in "Comics on Parade"; Sun betw 5:30-6 pm; Nov 21; 
4 wks (n) 

Partic in "The Fitzgeralds"; Mon betw 7:15-7:30 pm; Noi 21; 
6 wks (n) 

Annemts; Oct 11 ; 24 wks (n) 

Ford Theater (teletranscriptions); Sun 1-hr as sched monthlj 
Oct 17; 52 wks (on K Ti.\. until CBS affil starts telecasting) (n) 




Genera] Electric Co 



Maxon 



Gruen W atch Co 
A. 1). Juilliard Co 
Lever Brothers 

I bus. II. Lipton l)iv.) 
I Iggetl .\ Myers Tobacco Co Newell-Emmetl 



Grey 

Gotham 

^ oung & Rublcam 



Lionel < !orp 
PhiUp Morris & Co 
National Plywoods, Inc 

< llilsinol.il,- |)iv. of 

General Motors < !orp 

iv |.si ( ola (in of <:iii. 

Pioneer Scientific Corp 

(Polaroid I \ lens) 

Procter & Gamble ( !o 
C. H. 1). Robbins Dress Co 
Ronson Art Metal Works 
Sta-Neet Corp 

(haircut comb) 
Sterling Drug, Inc 

(Centaur-CaldweU Di\. for 

"Mulle Brushless") 
Transmlrra Products 

(TV filters) 
Trans vision, Inc < T\ kits.) 
Unique Art Mfg Co 



K.iss 

Blow 
MacDonald-< took 

I). P. Brut b. ■ 



i ay ton 



( lompton 

Henry .1 Kaufman 

Cecil & Presbrej 

Mayers 

Young & Rublcam 



Smith. Bull ,N 

Mil reerv 
II. J. Gold 
Gram 



l niud Cigar-Whelan 

Stores, Inc 
Vlck Chemical Co 
WaU n Tele-Vue Lens I .• 

Stephen F. Whitman 



Stanton B. Fisher 

Morse international 

( '.ay ion 

Ward W heelock 



ABC-IA nil 

WFIL-TV, Phila. 
WJ/.-IN \ 1 
I Its- I \ nil 

W \\ /-I \ . Deir. 
ABC-IA mi 
W B/- T\ . Bust. 
WENR-TV, Chi. 
VVNB1 n 1 

WGN-TV, Chi. 
VVRGB, S, hen 

W Mil. N. V. 
WNBW. Wash. 
NBC- TA in i 
W M \l I \ . Wash 
WBZ- I A . Bust. 
WCBS-TV, N. V. 

W Mil V V. 



VVNBT, N. Y. 

WBZ- l \ id. si 
WBKB, Chi. 
KTI.A. I \ 
\\ MIT, N. Y. 
DuMont nel 

NBC-TV nel 
NBC-IA mi 

WPIX, N \ 



Stop Me If You've Heard This One; Sun 8-8:30 pm; Jan 2; 

52 w ks (n) 
Time anncmts; Oct 25; [3 wks (n) 

Par tic in "Fashion Story"; Th hctw S-«:30pni; Nov 4; I3wks(n) 
Client Scouts (simulcast with AM radio); Moll 8:30-9 pm; 

Dec 6; 13 wks (n) 
Film anncmts; Nov 17; 52 wks (n) 

Tales of the Red Caboose; Fri 7:30-7:45 pm ; Oct 22; 13 wks (n) 
Film anncmts; Oct 25; 13 wks (n) 

Second Guessers; 15-min as sched weekly; Nov 7; 13 wks (n) 
NBC-TV Newscasts; Wed 10-10:10 pm; Oct 27-Nov 10 (thereafter 

on full NBC-TV net); 13 wks (n) 
Sparkling lime; Wed 8:30-9 pm; Nov 10; 13 wks (n) 
Film anncmts; Nov 3; 13 wks (n) 
Film anncmts; Oct 30; 13 wks (n) 
Film anncmts; Nov 6; 13 wks (n) 
I'd Like to See; Fri 9-9:30 pm; Nov 5; 13 wks (n) 
Parti C in "Fashion Story"; Th hctw- 8-8:30 pm; Nov 4; 13 wks (n) 
Time anncmts; Oct 11; 12 wks (n) 
Film anncmts; Nov 15; 13 wks (n) 

Film anncmts; Oct 16; 8 wks (n) 

Film anncmts; Nov 8; 13 wks (n) 

Anncmts; Oct 15; 6 wks (n) 
Film anncmts; Oct 1; 13 wks (n) 

Film anncmts; Nov 24; 13 wks (n) 

Charade Quiz; Th 8:30-9 pm; Oct 21; 13 wks (r) 

Picture This; Wed 8:20-8:30 pm; Nov 10; 13 wks (n) 

Great Fights; 5-min film as sched following Gillette bouts; 

Oct 15; 13 wks (n) 
Film anncmts; Nov 15; <i wks (n) 



New On Networks 



SSSS 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



< i. me Products Co Inc 
Elgin National Watch Co 
Kins, i Frazer < !orp 
Mars lo. 

Revere ( illllrra Co 



Bermingham. Castleman id 

Pierce 
I w altei l hompson 

w iiii.im Welntraub 

Gram 

Roche, Williams & Cleary 



MBS 


17 


NBC 


165 


MBS 


476 


NBC 

ABC 


42 
46 



Your's for a Song; Fri 9:30-9:55 pm; Nov 19; 26 wks 

Holiday Star Time; Th Nov 25. Sat Dec 25 4-6:00 pm; 

Nov 25 
Adventures ol the Thin Man ; Th 9-9:30"pm; Oct 28;52«ks 
Meet the Boss; n.ii 9:30-10 pm; Oct 2.K; 52 wks 
Dr. I. 0. Jr; Sat 5:30-6 pm; Jan 8; 52 wks 
Jo Stafford; Th 8:30-8:55 pm; Nov 11; 52 wks 



■ Fifty-two weeks generally means n 13-week contract with t>f>li"its h>r tttrre successive 13 week renewals, lis subject to cancellation at the end of any 13-ic*ek /* 



Renewals on Networks 




SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



( barter Products Inc 

Club Aluminum Products Co 
Continental Baking Co 
International Milling Co 

Ludens in. 
Swift &■ Co 



Sullivan. Stauffer. Cnlwell & 


ABC 


S9 


Bayles 






I.eo Burnt- 1 i 


Mil 


5(, 


leil Bates 


CBS 


IV 


( rooks 


MBS 


117 


.1. M. Mai his 


CBS 


161 


.1 Walter Thompson 


Mil 


289 




NBC 


162 



Jimmie Fidler; Sun 10:30-10:45 pm; Oct 3; 52 wks 

Club Time; Tu 10:45-11 am; Nov 2; 52 wks 

Grand Slam; MTWTF 11:30-11:45 am; Nov 22; 52 wks 

Oueen for a Day; MVYF 2-2:30 pm (alt 15 min segs); Oi I 

1 1 ; 52 wks 
Strike It Rich; Sun 5:30-6 pm; Nov 28; 52 wks 
Breakfast Club; MTWTF 9:15-9:45 am; Oct 25; 52 wks 
Meet the Mccks; Sat 11-11:30 am; Nov 6; 52 wks 



New Agency Appointments 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT (or service) 



AGENCY 




I III illl \llllll 111! V \ 

Arnold Bakers Inc. Port Chisi, i N 1 

\/ni Brewing Co. San Diego 

c ii i ei Produi is In, N ^ 

Cinderella Foods Inc. Dawson Ga. 

Iiilsi.n Candy Co, N t 

Eberhardl & Ober Brewery, Pittsb. 

Emerson Radio Co. N. Y. 

Federal Old Line Life Insurance Co. Seattle 

Gantner .N Mai urn s l 

Garcia & O'Connell, Sebastopol Calif. 

Iladilail-Wllhclm Inc. 1 A 

Hance Bros & While Co. Phila. 

Harvard Brewing Co. Lowell Mass. 

John l r \ i nii shoe Corp, Boston, 

Karlcrs Cough -I ./>■ Co, Detroit 

Kellogg Co I. id. London Ontario 

Levei Brothers < •■ (Pepsodenl dlv), Cambridge Miss 

Mill, i Brewing Co, Milw 

Nestled, n ^ 



Wines 
Bread, rolls 
A. B. C. Beii 



Si ,il> Inc. Chi. 

■ ayloi Reed • orp, Glenbrook Conn. 
I nlversal Carloadlng & Distributing Co Inc, N. 
w hltehall Pharmacal Co, N ^ 

u ii Mfg • .. In. l'hila. 



n.ii i asan 

Peanut but lei 
Delson I hin minis 
Beer 
Radio 

Insurance . 
Swim suits 

i Sauce dehydrated apples 

Dolly Madison Wines 
Pharmaceuticals 

Beer, Ale 
Shoes 

Cough-Eze 
Breakfast foods 

Lypsyl 
Beet 

Nis. afe. milk prods 

Mil I IISSIS 

i ocoa-Marsh Tumbo Puddings 
Frelghl foi warder 

Mj st i. Il.iii.l ( acam 

U Miliar Peanut But tit 



William von /.chic. N. Y 

Benton & Bowles. N. V. 

Zeder Talbott, Detroit 

Raymond Sped or, N \ 

Beaumont & I li.li iii.m . Atlanta 

Samuel CroOt . N ^ 

Smith, Taylor & Jenkins, Pittsb 

Blaine- I hompson. N. Y., for TV 

Pa* ilu Nai ional. Seat lie 

Kim hi mil & Ryan. S. F. 

Beaumont id llohman, S. F. 

Davis, L. A. 

Aitkin- Kynet I. Phila. 

Duane Jones. N. Y. 

Kay Austrian. N. Y. 

Luckoff. Wayburn & Frankel, Detroit 

kenyon & likhanll. Toronto 

RutiirauiT i\ Ryan, V y., foi Canada adv 

klau-Yan Piiiiisniii-Duiilap, Milw. 

Dohirtv. Clifford & Mi.iih, I.I N ^ 

Robert w . on. N. V. 

st. Georges & Keyes n \ 

Raymond Spector. N. Y. 

Harry B Cohen, N \ 

( Jemenis. Phila. 



I 'lease turn to page 80) 



OPENING COMMERCIALS ARE 

REMEMBERED BY 



IOWA LISTENERS/ 




he 1918 Iowa Radio Audience Sur- 
vey* proves that Iowa listeners remem- 
ber the opening commercial of the first 
program heard each day, and can later 

identify the product! 

48. 3 ( r ' ( of Iowa women and 47.3% of 
Iowa men report they hear the first 
commercial of the day's first program. 
70.7% of the women and 65.3% of the 
men could definitely identify the prod- 
uct advertised ... 

Conclusion: Iowa radio listeners give 
extraordinary listenership to radio! 

The 1918 Iowa Radio Audience Survey 
is full of just such "new information 
not previously gathered about listening 
habits in Iowa," as well as the newest 
and most up-to-date revisions of stand- 
ard information on station and pro- 
grain preferences, etc. 



Send for your complimentary copy 
today! Write us or Free & Peters. 

* The 1948 Iomu Radio Audience Survey is a "must" 
for every advertising, sales, or marketing man who is 
interested in the Iowa sales-potential. 

The 1918 I iliiiini is the eleventh annual study of 
radio listening hahits in Iowa. It was conducted hy 
Dr. F. L. Whan of Wichita University and his staff, is 
based on personal interviews of 9,224 Iowa families, 
scientifically selected from the city. town, village and 
farm audience. 

As a service to the sales, advertising, and research 
professions, WHO will gladly send a copy of the 1918 
Survey to anyone interested in the subjects covered. 

WIN® 

+/©r Iowa PLUS + 

Des Moines . . . 50,000 Watts 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 

I*. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 

FREE, .^PETERS, INC., National Representatives 



DECEMBER 1948 



19 




, ■iii ,, 'iiiiiiiiiiii Hiiiiip 





There's a lot more to it than this . . . 



The real question is — where and to whom is that commercial 
message going? . . . and what is it going to do when it gets there? 

Radio waves travel indiscriminately in all directions. 
So do a lot of sponsors' sales stories. In advertising this means 
waste circulation, a very expensive luxury. 

If your aim is to reach exactly the people you want in exactly 
the markets you want ... if you appreciate being able to 
concentrate your sales effort in one area and go easy in another 
... if the flexibility of short-term contracts appeals to you . . . 
if you like to select your own program times regardless of zone 
differentials ... if you want to make every advertising penny count 
(and who doesn't! ) . . . then — the place for a large share of your 
advertising budget is National Spot Radio . . . and the place to get 
all the information, guidance, facts and figures about Spot Radio is... 



Weed 

a n ci co m p a n y 



radio and television 
station representatives 



new y o r 



boston 



Chicago 



S .1 II 



I .1 11 C 1 s c o 



a t 1 a n t a 



20 



» d e t t o i t 

Hollywood 

SPONSOR 




At meetings such as this, sponsors change networks. (Left to right) Bill Weintraub, Ed Kobak (MBS), Edward Kaiser, Guy Lombardo, Harry Trennef 

Why sponsors change networks 



^^^to-i^ Sponsors change networks 
for every reason from pique 
" to interlocking directorates. 
And there are more changes because of 
irritation than because of the fact that an 
advertiser's stock is held by interests 
which also hold stock in a network. 
Colonel Robert McCormick for instance 
is an important stockholder in General 
Foods but G'F buys very little time on 
WGN, which McCormick owns or on 
Mutual, of which WGN is a 20 c ( ' owner. 
A like situation exists with Rexall, of 
which Edward J. Noble, majority owner 
and chairman of the board of ABC, is an 
important stockholder. ABC has still to 
have any Rexall network business shifted 
to it. 

DECEMBER 1948 



On the other hand the shift of American 
Tobacco's Hit Parade from CBS to NBC 
is said to have been more because of the 
recommendation of a program executive, 
eX'vp in charge of programs of CBS and 
radio head of the then ATC agency, 
Foote, Cone & Belding, than because of 
any other single reason. His memory of 
CBS was said to be not too happy. The 
entire broadcast schedule of a condensed 
milk firm shifted from one network to 
another because of the manner in which 
the sales manager of the network handled 
the shifting of a necessary time slot for the 
milk firm. 

In the pique shifts, there is always an 
apparently good reason for the moves. 
Seldom is a changeover from chain to 



chain made unless it will stand up on the 
surface. It is axiomatic that the madder 
a man becomes with a medium, the more 
energy he expends in finding a good sub' 
stitute for the medium which has raised 
his ire. NBC is delivering a higher 
Hooper for the Hit Parade than its previ' 
ous network. The milk company's pro- 
grams haven't been too set in their 
present slots to give a clearcut indication 
of how they'll deliver. In the latter case 
the annoyance of the executives with 
their former network was such that the 
president of the company in a closed cir- 
cuit talk to station managers of his new 
network pointedly told his listeners that 
he was on the new network because "we 
have not been entirely happy in our per- 



21 



Program shifts cost ehains sponsors. When Lever Ilros. wanted CHS from U to I O.: ; 




Lux Theater was producing audiences for Lever 
Brothers so they wanted to collect on them 



2 



"My Friend Irma" was building quickly so 
Lever wanted it real close to Lux Theater 



"Screen Guild Theatre" had to move to make 
way for "Irma," so NBC landed the Camel show 



sonal relationship with the network with 
which we have been associated." It was 
necessary that he explain the shift s'nce 
the business of his firm had increased 
316% while he was on the old network and 
at a rate 4 1 ■> times faster than the rest of 
the industry of which the company is a 
part. And 100% of this company's adver- 
tising was in broadcasting on the old net- 
work during this period. 

For years, shifts from network to net- 
work have been from lesser to larger 
chains, from a big network to a bigger. 
These automatic shifts are becoming less 
and less and each of the four nationwide 
webs takes clients from each other. There 



are many reasons for this, not the least of 
which is the fact that each of the net- 
works has time periods in which it 
dominates listening. 

Each of the networks have price sched- 
ules that differ. Although there is very 
little ratewise to choose between CBS and 
NBC, there is a great difference between 
ABC rates and the major networks and 
still greater differences between IV1BS and 
the other three chains. 

When it comes to cost-per-listener, rate 
cards are virtually discarded and it's 
every salesman for himself. Since pro- 
grams, not facilities, are responsible for 
listening, costs of reaching prospective 



buyers of each advertised product, cannot 
be based upon station coverage, signal 
strength, and other facility factors. Thus 
network sales promotional men have field 
days when they go to work on a prospec- 
tive advertiser. One chain made a pre- 
sentation to a client which included five 
errors of facts and figures. A competing 
network was shown the first web's pre- 
sentation and answered it with a well 
thought out and documented broadside 
titled No Hits! No Runs! Five Errors! 
P.S.; the second network landed the 
account. 

Presentations seldom are credited with 
bringing an account to a network. They 



Nine Reasons. Why Sponsors Change Networks 









Time Petty 

Availabilities* Annoyances 

' Including ad|ac«nci« 1 



More 
Promotion 



Programs 



Costs 



Network Friendship Ftomctol Interest Salesmanship 

biie & Coverage in Networks 



>lon«l ;i> h i liis happened 




imel wanted both NBC and CBS audiences 
- shifted Bob Hawk to CBS 10:30 on Mondays 



pave the way for an advertiser to be sold, 
that's all. For a number of years before 
U. S. Steel was ready to use broadcast 
advertising CBS had been making annual 
presentations to them on how to use the 
medium profitably. When Steel finally 
made up its mind, CBS had no satisfac- 
tory time slot available and ABC landed 
the very luscious plum. CBS has been 
fighting during the last few years to bring 
Steel to Columbia but thus far ABC has 
held on the business. 

In the past the number one considera- 
tion in a network shift, barring personal 
considerations, has been time availability. 
When a spot was relinquished by a big 
sponsor on NBC a few years ago there 
was a priority system which made the 
spot available to an established waiting 
list. This "favorite son" type of opera- 
tion has been discontinued recently and 
now it's a matter of program and other 
considerations that makes an NBC good 
time period available to certain sponsors 
— when it is available. A sponsor with a 
hot audience appeal program is always 
welcome at NBC which is generally far 
more interested in the vehicle a sponsor 
will bring to the network than the adver- 
tiser himself. This doesn't mean that an 
advertiser receives short shrift at the 
senior network but that he must be show- 
manship minded if he wants a premium 
time spot on NBC. Programs build 
listening habits as well as products and 
networks, and the advertiser who has a 
high Hooper program will have networks 
move heaven and earth to win him. 



One of the most desired programs on 
any network is CBS's Lux Theater. There 
hasn't been a year that NBC executives 
haven't traveled to Cambridge, Mass., to 
talk to the executives of Lever Brothers 
in an effort to sell them the idea of shifting 
the program to National. In its efforts to 
hold Lux, CBS was forced to ask Johns- 
Manville to give up the five-minute daily 
8:55-9 p.m. newscast which it had spon- 
sored for years. Lever wanted to sponsor 
the program aired before and after its 
Lux Theater, and didn't want its block of 
programs interrupted by a newscast. 
There was also the consideration that 
Campbell Soup's sponsorship of Edward 
R. Murrowat 7:45-8 p. m. was thought 
to be too near the 8:55 p.m. period to 
justify two newscasts. Thus Johns-Man- 
ville was requested to shift to another 
time period . . . later in the evening. That 
didn't sit too well with J-M and so the 
program moved, newscaster Bill Henry 
and all, to Mutual. Lever Brothers there- 
fore has a block of contiguous programs 
from 8:30 to 10:30 p.m. This made 
possible a sizable discount for Lever 
Brothers. It also made it possible to 
collect upon the fact that Lux Theater's 
audience was one of broadcasting's top 
group of consumers. Listeners generally 
don't change their dial settings before and 
after every program. They put the Lip- 
ton Tea (a Lever subsidiary) program, 
Arthur Godfrey's Talent Scouts, right be- 
fore the Lux Theater and My Friend Irma, 
now selling Pepsodent, directly after it. 
Since these are three non-cempeting 



products, all profit from the move. These 
moves were not without theirsponsor attri- 
tion to CBS. Before the Lever Brothers 
block was scheduled the Camel-sponsored 
Screen Guild Theatre followed Lux and 
was frequently in the Hcoperated First 
Fifteen along with Lux Theater. CBS 
notified Camels that Screen Guild Theatre 
would have to move to 10:30 p.m. 
Dramatic programs at 10:30 p.m. seldom 
gain sizable audiences (as a matter of 
record listening tapers off starting around 
10:15 p.m.), and so NBC made a pitch to 
Camels to shift the Screen Guild Theatre 
to NBC Thursdays at 10 p.m., a spot 
which then was occupied by Camel's Bob 
Hawk Show. The case it made for a 
dramatic program to follow the Thursday 
situation comedy block which had been on 
NBC for years Aldrich Family, Burns & 
Allen, Kraft Music Hall, and Scaltest 
Family Store sounded logical. NBC won 
the Screen Guild Theatre for Thursdays 
but Inst Bob Hawk to CBS in the shift. 
It did a good job selling the shift of the 
dramatic program but didn't prove its 
point that both programs ought to be on 
NBC. Bob Hawk took over the 10:30 
p.m. slot on CBS Mondays still holding on 
to some of the audience that Camels had 
had with Screen Guild Theatre previously 
30 minutes earlier. 

Forced program shifts have lost spon- 
sors to networks. This is true even when 
the shifts appear to be for the benefit of 
the advertiser. Some years back CBS de- 
cided to try to build a listening habit for 
( Please turn to page 82) 



DECEMBER 1948 



23 




21 Tears in Radio 



itio.nh ;in| in^ up and down with 
tin* Sin i ill ItrotlicrK 




TRADE 



MAR K. 



Eighty-nine years after they 
first advertised their prod' 
uct,* modestly for the times, as "a cure 
for hoarseness and every kind of cough 
not positively incurable," radio changed 
the basic product advertising policy of the 
venerable Poughkeepsie firm of Smith 
Brothers, Inc. 

Changes come slowly to Smith Brothers, 
and to many another U. S. firm that has 
survived a century of hard competitive 
business. Advertising tends to develop 
into a sort of ivy-covered tradition. But 
in 1941, something happened to change 
nearly ten decades of Smith Brothers ad- 
vertising, and that something was selec- 
tive radio. 

Smith Brothers' tendency was to try 
and sell most, or all, of their products at 
one time in their advertising. The idea 



was that if "you sell the company, you 
sell the products." It had worked for 
years, never with startling success, in 
space advertising (but bearded Smiths be- 
came part of Americana as a result) and in 
network radio. When Smith Brothers 
added menthol cough drops to their orig- 
inal line in 1922, they sold them as 
"SMITH BROTHERS . . . black or 
menthol." 

By 1941, the menthol drops were well 
established in the markets (East, North 
Central, and Northwest U. S.) where the 
major part of America's $25,000,01)0 
annual business in cough drops is done. 
Menthol drops accounted for nearly J5 ( , 
of the Smith firm's then-$5,000,000 yearly 
sales. 

At that point in the history of Smith 
Brothers advertising, the advertising bud- 



get of some $100,000 was split between 
magazines (50%), newspapers (30%) and 
national selective radio (20%). Radio 
was handled on a "live" basis, with local 
announcers reading the familiar copy 
themes sent them by the J. D. Tarcher 
agency. Selective radio was being used, 
because after 10 years of seasonal network 
radio Smith Brothers had switched over 
to the selective basis in 1937 to cope with 
reduced budgets. 

One of the Smith executives, Lewis 
Shaw (then assistant to the late J. Stuart 
Bates, vp in charge of sales and advertis- 
ing; currently holding Bates' job since 
1945) had the feeling that something was 
definitely wrong with the Smith Brothers' 
use of the air. The Tarcher agency, 



"The first advertising appeared in 1852, pit years after 
Smith Brothers went into business. 



It was in the back of this store that "cough candy" was first cooked. Store still houses a restaurant with a national reputation-Smith Brothers 




Cough Candy. 

THE subscriber, at N .. 23 Market Street, Pongh 
keepsie, manufactures a COUGH CANT) V which 
has stood a test which has established its superior qualities t« 
the Hatisfaction of all who liavo had occasion to try it. That 
it is of the highest value for the purposes for which ita inten- 
ded might be shown by scores of certificates, bnt they are un- 
necessary where the article is manufactured. Its reputation 
as a cure for hoarseness and every kind of cough not positive- 
ly incurable, is established so firmly that it cannot be shaken, 
and those who want convincing only need to make a trial. — 
All riftlicled with Hoaiseness, Coughs, or Colds, should test 
its virtues, which can be done without the least risk. 

Sold wholesale and retail at 23 Market Street, and also by 
Dr. E.TiuvETT.and Van Valkkniu'Roii & Cokkin, Drug- 
gists. A liberal discount made to dealers. 

WILLIAM SMITH. 

Poughkeepsle, Dec. 10. 1852. 3m67 



This ad introduced Smith Brothers cough drops. For 75 years newspapers carried S-B ad burden 



which had been placing Smith advertising 
for nearly 25 years, assured him politely 
that he was wrong. Selling menthol 
cough drops and black ones separately 
(Shaw's idea), said the Tarcher agency, 
wouldn't make any difference. 

Shaw determined to find out for him- 
self. 

One of the local voices that had sung 
the praises of Smith Brothers was the 
sleepy-voiced, red-headed guy named 
Arthur Godfrey. When Godfrey came up 
from Washington's WTOP to do a morn- 
ing show on WCBS (then WABC), Shaw 
went to him with a proposition. Over a 
luncheon table, Shaw said that he was 
going to buy time on Godfrey's show, but 
he wanted Godfrey to plug the menthol 
cough drops only. 

During the seasonal cycle of Smith 



Brothers advertising in the 1941-42 
period, Godfrey bore down hard on 
menthol. The New York market that 
Godfrey was selling to was a good test 
case, because the other Smith advertising 
in New York, like the entire national 
media used by Smith, was selling both 
products at once. Furthermore, the sale 
of Smith Brothers menthol cough drops 
in New York was below the national 
average. 

When Smith Brothers sat down to view 
the returns at the end of the season, they 
found that their national increase in the 
sale of menthol cough crops was 12%. 
But, their sales increase in the New York 
market for menthol was 30' , . 

Smith Brothers decided there and then 
(Please tarn to page 40) 




In 1927, Scrappy Lambert and Billy Hillpot 
(with Shillkret in middle) sold SB cough drops 




Arthur Godfrey proved that the SB had to re 
menthol and black cough drops separately 



All Poughkeepsie turned out to celebrate Smith Brothers Centenary at the SB restaurant. Current SB are in middle under "Trade" and "Mark 
S 






** * v 



±* 






£. 



M 









\fi 



fy&«^— . 



as 



b. 





Comes the moment in a folk music broadcast when the boy and girl step up to sing of love. Dewey Price and Betty Johnson of "Carolina Hayride' 



How I o trash 
the farm circle 



Cowboy groups and religious iiiusie an* 
tin* onlv sure I'ire fuvorilos 



ffi ffi 



26 



To sell a farm audience you've 
got to make them listen, and 
they, like anyone else, listen to 
what they like. What do they like? Do 
their tastes differ sharply from their urban 
cousins'? Are regional differences im- 
portant? 

National surveys throw some light on 
these questions. But the accumulated 
wisdom of stations who cater specifically 
to rural dialers are better guides, in many 
instances, because they take into account 
important regional preferences. A com- 
mercial designed to sell a big city audience 

SPONSOR 



is definitely not, in many cases, an effec- 
tive approach to farm audiences. 

What's the best way to talk to farm 
women in the daytime? Obviousl) 
there's no one "best" way. But station 
managers who specialize in reaching Mrs. 
Farm Housewife and groups who have 
made independent studies of farm listen- 
ing have discovered certain facts as a 
guide. Farm women, like their urban 
sisters, listen to news, service programs, 
and entertainment such as music, drama, 
comedy, etc. News is first with them as 
with city listeners. 

As with non-farm listeners, news and 
music, in that order, are the most popular 
program material with farm women 
throughout the country. 

Music of a religious tone is liked best, 
with oldtime (including folk, western, 
hillbilly, etc.) a close second. Regional 
preferences in music, however, vary con- 
siderably. 

Successful farm stations are extremely 
sensitive to the likes and dislikes of their 
dialers to individual musical artists as 
well as types of music. It is one of the 
unsolved sorrows of many farm station 
managers that they find it so difficult to 
convince the gentlemen of Madison 
Avenue (as one manager put it) of the 
terrific hold folk music has on its rural 
devotees. 

One farm station manager submitted 
four hillbilly-type quarter-hour shows to 
the agency and advertising manager of a 
large soap manufacturer who requested 
daytime availabilities. They rejected the 
shows with unprintable comments (seems 
they weren't hillbilly music fanciers). 
They wanted a typical soap opera. When 
the manager refused on the grounds his 
audience liked his musical shows better, 
the company doubtfully gave in, in order 
to get the desired time. Results made 
believers out of the ad manager and 
account executive involved. 

This same station manager, himself no 
lover of hillbilly music, has an acute sense 
of just what his farm listeners like best. 
"If I find my wife and daughter listening 
to one of my hillbilly units, I get rid of the 
fiddlers quick," he said, "because they're 
too good." What he really meant to 
emphasize, of course, is that folk music in 
just the right groove to best suit the 
majority of his listeners is a highly special- 
ized product and can't vary much from 
the favored pattern without losing 
listeners. 

Other instances of regional preferences 
are reported by a U. S. Department of 
Agriculture survey. Religious music and 
programs are twice as important to 
Southern farm women as they are to 








RANGE MUSIC is big out west, KABC, San Antonio, serves comedy and cowboys lor lunch 




SPIRITUALS are a must for rural programing. WRFD, Worthington, O., features the Columbians 




BARN DANCES attract live and air audiences. KSTP, St. Paul, reaches great audiences with unit 



DECEMBER 1948 



27 




WASHBOARDS are hillbilly ins rjments and nat- TROUBADOURS with guitars give farmers' daugh- 
jally KMBC (Kansas city) features one in a band ters heart throbs. WLW's Kenny Roberts is typical 




"UNCLES" still pull ears of the wee ones in rural SISTER ACTS, like the Murphy Sisters at WFIL 
areas. WMT (Ceder Rapids) has Uncle Warren (Philadelphia) are great farm family drawing cards 




residents in North Central states and four 
times as important to them as to farm 
women in the West. 

Such regional variations aren't limited 
to a single type of program, but apply to 
all types. The Department of Agricul- 
ture national survey of 1945, and indi- 
vidual area surveys since, indicate that 
daytime serials (soap operas) rank some- 
where below news, music, religious pro- 
grams and other entertainment shows. 
But that rank order doesn't always hold 
good in area by area listening. 

A notable farm station like WLW Cin- 
cinnati) produces more than 40'j of its 
own shows. Yet it will have more than 
twenty serial dramas (mostly network 
originations) between 9:30 in the morning 
and 6:00 in the afternoon. There is 
currently a block of 17 afternoon serials. 
At noon and before 9:30 a.m. on week- 
days there are some half dozen news, 
service, and entertainment features pro- 
duced specifically for farm listening. 

Daytime serial listening tends to in- 
crease as the size of the community de- 
creases and the educational level de- 
creases. Nevertheless, this is probably 
the outstanding daytime program type, 
other than news and Breakjast Club type 
shows, the content of which need not 
necessarily be specially slanted in order to 
achieve maximum urban and rural 
listening. 

This has a bearing on the fact that 
another famous farm station, W1BW 
(Topeka), a CBS affiliate, offers its 
listeners only seven daytime serials (two 
in the morning, five in the afternoon^ 
WIBW's programing is designed 1 009c for 
rural listening, and they prefer to build 
the majority of their daytime programs 
with a more pronounced rural appeal. 
The same is true of WLS (Chicago) and 
other leading farm stations. It is es- 
pecially true of farm stations whose cover- 
age includes a more important agricul- 
tural than urban area. 

Stations like WRFD ( Worth ington, 
Ohio), for example, simply make it their 
business to learn the program likes and 
dislikes of farm listeners in their area who 
aren't devotees of the daily strips. 

WRFD first went on the air in Sep- 
tember, 1947. A recent survey of rural 
Families only in Ohio's 88 counties by the 
Fred A. Palmer Company disclosed that 
WRFD was second only to WLW as rural 
Ohio's favorite station from sunup to sun- 
set. when it leaves the air. 

Their audiences like music with the 

"homey" flavor; so they get an abundance 

of familiar show tunes, songs from the 

Community Songbook, hymns, old favor- 

(Please turn to page 40) 



PHILOSOPHERS, home spun style, pull enormous 
mail. WIBW (Wichita) has "Henry's Exchange" 



QUARTETS (boots and saddles give) Western slant 
to Minneopolis' WCCO - Murphy Barn Dance 






PICTURE STORY OF THE MONTH 




1. jrjno behind each script is checked by "Fashions on Parade" executives 
lilt/d President Leon Roth, Arthur Knorr, Charles Caplin and Marty Fink 




2 - clothes 



are picked by commentator Adelaide Hawley, so she always 
sounds authoritative on telecast-pantomime which she voices 




PM 




show 



Soap company's first 
TV venture reaches 

I lie well-ilresscd women 



M^ 



accessories 



lend extra feminine interest to every program and they're 
picked with special care by Miss Hawley for each costume 



Only a small percentage of women even 
pretend disinterest in what they wear. It's 
this fact that has made Friday evening 
lady's night in many TV homes. Friday at 8 p.m. (est) 
Fashions on Parade takes over the DuMont network for a 
half hour. The title is really a misnomer since telecast is 
actually a story of Fashions at Work. This style show is 
presented as a tale in which the Conover Girls are char- 
acters in a story — a bit of fiction designed to demonstrate 
how good clothes and accessories contribute to daily- 
living. Adelaide Hawley, broadcast pioneer and fashion 
commentator, is the voice behind the program. It was 
first sponsored by a number of department stores but 
now its over-all sponsor is Procter & Gamble. P&G pays 
the bills for the time and a number of fashion houses pay 
the cost of the production. It's an expensive present.i 
tion but with the bills split many ways no single sponsor 
is caught with a big tab. While the fashion sponsors 
change from time to time, current regulars are Ivel Furs, 
Gotham Hosiery, Larry Aldrich, Sheila Lynn, Dorian- 
Macksoud, Palter DeLiso and Wilma. 

Each week the staff of Fashions on Parade dreams-up a 
plot in which fashions selected by Adelaide Hawley can be 
telecast beautifully. Each week Procter & Gamble tells 
the fashion-minded viewers why its products simplify the 
care of beautiful wearables. The TV wedding of style and 
its upkeep is a natural for all concerned. 







5. r>nmmnn+irw n carefully checked by Miss Hawley during rehear- 
l/OIMIMcllldry sal, for feminine 



le viewers quickly catch fashion errors 



6" Ctllflin a * DuMont's John Wanamaker installation has as many as six stag> 
OlUUlU as models make'eostume and accessory changes in order that each 



Q * P&fl hllVQ the show. Bill Ramsay signs for sponsor. DuMont's Hum I ■ pntTlTlPrpifll '» designed as a logical part of fashion telecast, demon 

U ' aU UU J° Grieg and Benton & Bowies' Walter Craig look on ,U UUIIHIIWWOI seating the correct sudsing care of milady's wardrob. 





' typical, ""Fashions on Parade" presentation each week. It's a beehive of activity 
wer may find one'item she'd like to own. Most telecast fashions run the price gamut 



■ nrnmntinn to 3 rocer ' s Planned. This is vital since he genera ly doesn't 
pi UIIIU UU1I v j cw a women's program. Agency's Brown Bolte (right) checks 




7 ■ plot 



is written for each program so that good fashion is well demon- 
strated, (above) Aunty isn't impressed by boy's latest love light 



(^ 



•■[mrr 

I I: 

Mi I \ii I 

M Hill \ 




8- Homnnctrotinnc dre woven into eacn s,or y s ° tnat product in- 
UvlllUlloll dllUllo formation is achieved without pain to viewer 

1? ' rP/lPtifin to P ro 9 ram is frequently immediate as viewers phone to 
\ L ICdUUUII gj^ wnere they can purchase items seen on program 




fftje 



Q'v>v>J 








What they want and generally don't get is 
proof of sales effeetiveness 



fl "We're not in showbusiness. 
; We want to do our public 
servicing direct. Our sales policies and 
our products build our good-will ; we don't 
expect our corporate name to carry our 
merchandise, so we don't advertise to 
build good-will but to sell our products 
which in turn build public acceptance 
for us." 

That, in one paragraph, spells out the 



thinking from which springs the laments 
of over 50% of the nation's sales man- 
agers if sponsor's cross-section can be 
projected to all sales managers of national 
advertisers. It's not unexpected that 
sales managers think in terms of sales first 
and feel that sales should build further 
sales and the necessary good-will. How- 
ever, it must be kept in mind at all times 
that over 65% of all advertising managers 



Problems with the medium 

1. There's loo much talk of audiences and too little of sales 

2. Network sales executives generally have too much 
"respect" lor line of authority and contact advertising 
men ami presidents only 

.'i. Only a small portion of the nation's broadcasting sta- 
tions arc promotional minded 

I. Contacts between stations and wholesale dealers in 
their areas are infrequent 

.">. Fad that some stations arc over-priced is hidden in 
lot al net w ork COStS 

6. Few stations deliver audiences in relationship with i li«-ir 

power. Some 50,000 watt outlets are outsold bj I. (HID 

watt stations. hut you'd never know it h\ their rate cards 

7. Direct mail promotion at a station level is generall) inept 
and a greal pari of network mailings is also no greal 
shakes 

ii. Broadcasters talk ahout too much advertising on the 
air and do nothing ahout it when it's 100' , within their 

power to stop ii 



report to top sales management and there- 
fore advertising policy is more often than 
not set by the sales vp. Thus the laments 
of sales managers on broadcast advertising 
are vital and because they have gone un- 
answered in a number of cases sponsors 
have dropped radio as a medium. 

"Sales for our products can't be indi- 
cated by any boxtop formula," explains 
the sales manager of a great shoe manu- 
facturer who used broadcast advertising 
for a number of years and then shelved it. 
"Our programs apparently had a great 
listening audience, our fan mail was inter- 
esting reading but our sales did not rise, 
as they should, when more money is 
poured into advertising. A special survey 
which we conducted proved that we had 
established our trade name on the lips of 
a good segment of the women of America 
(we sell women's shoes) but radio just 
didn't produce apparently the desire to 
buy our product. We just couldn't enter- 
tain them into our dealers." 

Examination of the scripts of the shows 
of, this advertiser indicates that a great 
deal of attention was given to the pro- 
gram and the establishing of the sponsor's 
trade name, but that the commercials did 
not create a desire for ownership of their 
shoes. The sales manager admitted that 
the agency and the advertising manager 
of the firm were of the opinion that it was 
impossible to sell shoes via the air and 
that the actual selling should be left to the 
retailer. A memo from the ad-man to his 
chief underlined the fact that to his mind 
radio could only "bring 'em in," not pre- 
sell them. The sales manager's lament in 
this case should have been directed at his 
advertising agency and advertising de- 
partment, not the medium, Neverthe- 
less, there are literally hundreds of adver- 
tising managers who feel that selling 
should be avoided on the air in favor of 
what they call advertising. They feel 
that punchy commercials are selling and 
that hard hitting advertising isn't "in 
keeping with the dignity of our firm." 
They have yet to leam the difference 
between effective "reason why" copy and 
nerve-wracking repetitive commercials. 

It's more difficult to get "reason why" 
copy across without chasing listeners but a 
partial audience which hears product facts 
is worth a total audience that hears only a 
trade name and obvious slogans. It has 
been mam /ears since networks and sta- 
tions forbade direct-selling copy but there 
are still too many advertising agencies and 
ad-managers, say their sales- manager 
chiefs, who avoid, as though the plague, 
real reason-why copy in air continuity. 

Lack of sales effectiveness data is a 
basic objection that sales managers have 



SPONSOR 



to all advertising media but to broadcast- 
tng especially. They have an enormous 
respect for salesmanship and an amazing 
reluctance to credit advertising with basic 
credit for consumer product acceptance. 
They insist that advertising must carry 
its share of the sales burden. 

"There is no reason why broadcast ad' 
vertising should be looked upon as an 
operating expense. It should be con- 
sidered as a sales expense. Only then 
will an advertising man be considered by 
most managements as productive," is the 
way one sales executive puts it. 

With full realization of the rivalry be- 
tween sales and advertising, one corpora- 
tion makes its sales managers also its ad- 
vertising managers with the title "sales 
and advertising manager." Thus there 
can be no conflict between the sales and 
the advertising objectives in this par- 
ticular firm. (What it does to the nerves 
of some of the executives involved is some- 
thing else again.) Broadcasting has lost 
many an advertising schedule because the 
man who has had to meet a specific sales 
quota has been sold on the belief that 
radio is not an "immediate impact 
medium." The truth of the matter is that 
the air like any other medium can do the 
job assigned to it. The trouble is that 
most national advertisers themselves 
haven't set their sights on immediate sales 
from broadcast advertising. 

The second most important gripe of 
sales managers may be found in the fact 
that money must be spent to promote 
broadcast advertising. "It would appeal 
that the cost of time and talent is the 
total cost of using the air to sell merchan- 
dise," states one sales manager. "That's 



furthest from the fact. We find that it's 
important to have a public relations cam- 
paign planned. This, while not costing 
the $225,000 which Lucky Strike spent 
during the first year of its sponsorship of 
the Jack Benny program, runs into five 
figures and better very quickly. We don't 
have to do that with black and white ad- 
vertising. I know that such a campaign 
increases the audience for our advertising 
but it's never included in our broadcast 
advertising costs. It's sneaked up on us 
after we've decided on a campaign and 
bought the program and the time. 
Either our advertising manager or the 
account executive of our agency sidles up 
to us with the suggestion that we ought to 
"insure" the success of our show by em- 
ploying a press agent. Then there is talk 
of a budget for the public relations man 
and so on, including a cocktail party for 
the press, which frequently sets back a 
sponsor another $1,000. 

"If you refuse to kick-in, you're a 
cheapskate and so you okay the advertis- 
ing department's request. Every time I 
do it, it gets me hot under the collar. 
This is the first time I've had the oppor- 
tunity of sounding off. I know that my 
feelings about these 'extra added' ex- 
penses are not unique with me, so my 
anonymity won't be invaded when you 
print these facts. The party expenses are 
billed to us through the agency and as 
though to add insult to injury the agency 
adds its \5'l to the bill. I know that 
broadcasting is a different form of adver- 
tising but hidden costs are no more ac- 
ceptable to us in radio than they are in 
other media." 

The bigger the advertising budget the 



less sales managers appear to object to 
"hidden costs." That's because great 
corporations have contingency funds 
which are set aside for the very purpose of 
covering unexpected expenses of opera- 
tion. Many and sundry are the items 
that are charged against these special 
funds. It's a good thing, say most sales 
vp's, that auditors have been trained not 
to question too exhaustively items charged 
against contingency budgets. "If they 
did we'd have to think up a lot of new 
names to cover old sales expenses," ex- 
plained the sales chief of a multi-million 
dollar corporation. 

"We've never had a program on the 
air, except a daytime serial that didn't 
develop a veritable plumed tail of extras," 
stated one divisional sales-advertising 
executive of a food corporation. "We're 
used to the plume by now but it irritates 
us nevertheless every time it's pushed 
into our faces," was his postscript. 

Sales managers are constantly worried 
about okaying a broadcast advertising 
theme that hasn't been pre-tested. They 
feel that even the best of the pre-testing 
formulas developed thus far are totally 
inadequate gauges of what will and will 
not sell. They feel that Schwerin's panels 
are too metropolitan in their composition, 
that Wesley's galvanometer samples too 
few consumers and is too "big city" in its 
sample, and that Teldox doesn't report on 
commercial effectiveness. They also have 
little faith in ad-agency "consumer 
panels." They feel that Industrial Sur- 
veys' panel operation is helpful but not 
conclusive and that Nielsen's consumer 
index may eventually help them but that 
{Please turn to page 50) 



Internal 1'robleins 

1. Advertising: managers resent being part of 
sales stalT 

2. Top management is more impressed by 
"presti-je" than by resultful broadcast ad- 



3. Advertising: departments are seldom willing; 
to plaee schedules on the basis of what each 
market produees 

4. Sales activities are seldom coordinated with 
advertising; 

5. Most salesmen slill refuse to properly pro- 
mote their firm's broadcast advertising 

6. Advertising; budgets are seldom flexible 

DECEMBER 1948 



Problems with ageneies 

1. Pretesting of sales effectiveness of broadeast 
advertising campaigns is generally bypassed 

2. They prefer to buy network advertising 
rather than market-by-market (selective) 
broadcasting 

3. Too few account men are sales-trained 

4. There is too little direet contact between 
agency's creative departments and client 
sales management 

5. \\ hen publicity is needed the tendency is to 
"throw a party" and bill the client 

6. Less front and more work 

7. "If only they'd get off Madison and North 
Michigan avenues and find out what sells at 
the retail level throughout America'* 



33 










*=* 



~SJ 



V 



/ 







TH/S 



/ cr^ > 




"Uncle Elmer's Song Circle" on WEEI, with homespun philosophy and hymns, makes New England greeting card buyers aware of Gibson Art 




<iii i iii" air 



Itroaileasl advertising 
lias <*i*4*at<Ml a new brand name eonscioiisiiess 




( •■ Sentiment is big business — 

3 witness over $2 4,000,000 
spent in radio this year to sponsor two 
dozen soap operas. The sentimental ap- 
peal which make daytime dramatic serials 
so popular is also big business for 300' 
odd U. S. greeting card publishers. Greet' 
ing card sales at the wholesale level in 
1948 will top $85,000,000. At retail, 
with an average mark-up of 100%, the 
sum will exceed $170,000,000. 

For years, the greeting card business 
has been one ol strange selling contra- 
dictions. Broadcast advertising lias done 
.in nut standing job for a few greeting 
manufacturers, notably the Kansas 
( it; firm of Hall Brothers, Inc. Radio 
has created "brand conscious" buying of 



greeting cards where little such buying 
was done before. Surveys today show 
that as much as 50% of the customers at 
greeting card counters look first for 
trademarks, and then for style and price. 
The largest firms (they're also the real 
advertisers) are in the so-called "dealer 
group" who sell via a large sales force to 
individual stores, or groups of stores. 
The four largest firms in this group are 
the four largest in the entire greeting- 
card industry — Hall Brothers, Inc.; Gib- 
son Art Company; Norcross, Inc.; and 
Rust Craft Publishing Company. To- 
gether, their combined sales account for 
40% of the dollar volume of the business. 
They are as keenly competitive as Macy's 
and Gimbel's during an August fur sale. 



They steal ideas from each other with 
the tongue-in-cheek nonchalance of Hol- 
lywood gag writers. All four have used 
broadcast advertising with varying de- 
grees of success, but the radio success of 
Hall Brothers since 1940 has been largely 
ignored by other industry leaders and by 
the greeting card industry in general. 

This is surprising in view of the fact 
that Hall's air selling has benefited the 
year-round sales curves of the entire 
industry. When Hall Brothers first came 
to radio to do a network selling job eight 
years ago, the greeting card business still 
did a seasonal business, and marked time 
between the peaks in the sales charts. 

Today, the greeting card business is 
firmly on a 52-week basis. Christmas 



34 



SPONSOR 



cards are a very sizeable portion of the 
business, but the 1948 breakdown of the 
greeting card sales of the average large 
store with a greeting card department 
will be a surprise to many: 



r vi'i: 


% 


Everyday Cards 


45.1 


' hi Mmas 


27.7 


Valentine 


9.4 


Easter 


6.7 


Mother's Day 


5.3 


Father's Day 


2.6 


Graduation 


1.5 


Party Goods 


1.0 


Hallowe'en, etc. 


0.7 



100 

Nearly half of the greeting cards sold 
today have little or nothing to do with 
seasonal events or national holidays! 
They are purely personal, everyday sen- 
timents. 

Here is how the "Everyday" cards 
break down in selling popularity: 



Birthday (gcn'l) 


31.4 


Family members 


18.8 


Anniversary 


9.6 


Illness 


9.0 


Congratulatory 


9.0 


Gift cards 


5.6 


Packaged (party) 


5.6 


Thank Vou's 


3.5 


Sympathy 


3.5 


Friendship 


2.5 


Religious 


.8 


Travel 


.7 



100.0 

In addition to the straight greeting 
card line, the large greeting card pub' 
Ushers have been producing profitable 
side lines during the past decade which 
amount to 5% of their over-all business. 
These include fancy paper napkins, party 
favors, gift wrappings, and repeat-sale 
features such as Hallmark Dolls (which 
can be sent as birthday cards). 



Ever since greeting cards were first 
made and sold in the United States by 
Louis Prang of Boston, in 1875, the greet- 
ing card has been a product that appeals 
primarily to women. At least seven out 
of ten purchases today are made by the 
the ladies, although there has always 
been a certain amount of business done 
in "masculine appeal" cards. 

One greeting card executive, Robert J. 
Bender of Gartner & Bender, believes 
there is a psychological basis for the over- 
whelming percentage of women buyers. 
He has stated that the greeting card 
business is based primarily on a search 
for security, and that women's natural 
desire to cement personal ties is fulfilled 
temporarily in greeting cards. Since 
G&B's sales are mostly to jobbers, 
Bender does little consumer advertising, 
but in his trade promotions he stresses 
the fact that to sell greeting cards, you 
have to sell the women. That it pays 
off is evidenced by the fact that G&B's 
sales have increased 13 times from the 
1935 level, until they now sell 200,000,000 
cards a year for a gross of nearly 
$4,000,000. 

This basic selling factor was one of 
the major reasons for the success of Hall 
Brothers, Inc., now the world's largest 
greeting card designers, publishers, and 
distributors. Their rise to this position 
has been rapid and recent, but it has 
been as a result of sound merchandising 
tactics that the public has become 
"brand name conscious" of Hallmark 
cards. 

The Hall Brothers firm started in a 
small retail book store in Norfolk, Ne- 
braska. The time was 1913. Most of the 



business in greeting cards was done in 
cards imported cheaply from Europe. It 
was an up-and-down, nickel-and-dime 
operation, and shipments often arrived 
too late for seasonal sale. Joyce Hall, 
youngest of the three brothers, told the 
others: "Why don't we make our own?" 
The others— William and Rollie — 
agreed. In 1915 they started their firm 
in Kansas City, and went into competi- 
tion with Gibson, Paramount, Norcross 
and others. Ingenuity often had to make 
up for promotional dollars. They broad- 
ened the line to include not only holiday, 
seasonal and special-occasion cards, but 
the first real everyday line. By 1924, 
they had national distribution for their 
product. By 1936, they built a new 
(Please turn to page 58) 







(above) Luana Patten, Hallmark's paper doll cover girl, shows her dolls 
(right) Miss Patten shows doll book to Lionel Barrymore at rehearsal 
(below) James Hilton, Hallmark mc, knows how to handle sentiment 





Mr. Sponsor asks. 




The 

l*i<*k< k €l Panel 
answers 
Mr. Ilettig 

The question of 
how much money 
or rather what per- 
cent of its gross 
revenue a station 
should spend in 
promoting com- 
mercial programs 
is really the $64.00 
one. During the 
course of a busi- 
ness week this question comes up at least 
a dozen times and quite frankly after 
years of experience there still seems to be 
no single yardstick to apply. However, 
no business has ever been successful that 
does not use merchandising as a tool for 
selling. There are two excellent reasons 
why stations and networks should pro- 
mote programs: 

1. The only way to build audience 
is to tell prospective listeners what 
you have to offer them. 

2. Increased audience means in- 
creased ratings which mean increased 
business. 

It generally follows that programs 
which seem to have the greatest potential 
for capturing audiences are those which 
are promoted the most. There is a direct 
relationship of radio promotion to, for 
example, department store advertising. 
A department store will advertise its 
most saleable goods to attract buyers into 
its store. While in the store the buyer is 
exposed to other merchandise for sale. 



"To be fully effective, network or spot commer- 
cial programs often need good promotion and 
merchandising by stations carrying them.. How 
much in the way of such services should net- 
works and stations provide?" 



R. G. Rettig 



Vice-President 
Whitehall Pharmacol Company, N. Y. 



The same holds true for radio promotion. 
A strong program promoted to its fullest 
will attract listeners to a station and 
while at the dial setting the listeners are in 
a better position to be exposed to follow- 
ing programs. 

A study of stations shows that those 
who in the past have been heavy pro- 
moters are the ones who are now in the 
enviable position of being commercially 
the most profitable. The alert station 
manager uses program promotion as a 
tool not only to secure audience, but also 
to promote the sale of time on a station 
locally. His call letters prominently dis- 
played on all types of promotion lead 
local advertisers to believe that his is a 
wide-awake strongly-saleable advertising 
medium. 

Ted Oberfelder 

Director, Advertising & Promotion 

ABC, New York 



It is our policy 
here at WDSU 
and WDSU-TV 
never to use ads in 
> local newspapers 

to promote na- 
tional selective 
programs, or any 
other programs for 
that matter. The 
newspapers do 
allocate a limited amount of space on a 
courtesy basis to us for a "Radio Hi- 
lites" column. 

WDSU does place ads, shorts, features, 
pictures, etc., in a weekly publication de- 
voted exclusively to radio and widely 
circulated among our listening audience. 
We have found this medium, The Illus- 
trated Press, to be most eflcctivc and we 
employ it more extensively than does any 
other local station. The material used in 




the Press is aimed at ballyhooing pro- 
grams and special events. 

Perhaps the most potent reason for our 
not promoting national selective adver- 
tising is that our rates for this type of 
radio advertising are comparatively low 
in proportion to our advertising budget. 
If we were to have our "praisery" plug it, 
naturally the sponsors' costs would in- 
crease since our own operational cost 
would increase. 

This policy with regard to national 
selective promotion is based on cold busi- 
ness experience. Actually, the sponsor 
loses little or nothing. WDSU maintains 
a consistently excellent Hooper rating. 
Charles Price 
Advertising Manager 
WDSU, New Orleans 



How much pro- 
gram promotion 
should a network 
provide its adver- 
tisers? There's 
really no answer 
other than this 
generality: "more 
than the program 
needs." 
Speaking for 
most networks, but particularly for CBS, 
an advertiser can expect a complete pro- 
motion campaign for his program, whether 
it be fifteen minutes daytime, once a 
week; a half-hour strip, or an evening 
full-hour once a week. 

Program promotion — merchandising of 
a program to prospective audiences — is a 
service of radio over and above its rate 
card. It's for free. And an advertiser 
should come to radio ready to capitalize 
on this service and at the same time, 
prepared to accelerate the efforts of a net- 
(Pleasc turn to page 46) 




36 



SPONSOR 



. . you CAN 

REDUCE YOUR 
1949 SALES COSTS 



Ui, 



iAe DETROIT A*ea 




See, Uaca m^cit l^#l y J Py fT *&&**&> *f&u <f&t o*t 

— C K LW 

We r te Qoinxj, 50 hut. at 800 kc. 

eabui in '4-9 

This Greater Voice, fostering Good Will on both sides of the border, will give the 
Detroit Area's Best Radio Buy a new selling wallop beyond duplication in this region! 

Guardian Bldg., Detroit 26 Adam J. Young, Jr., Inc., Nafl Rep. 

J. E. Campeau, President H. N. Stovin & Co., Canadian Rep. 



DECEMBER 1948 37 



RADIO AMI TV SETS 



-I'oV-nli: 1 1 . .it ..... .. I,\,,l„, ( orp. M.I \< 1 : Dan B. Miner 

< IPS1 M i VSE HISTORY: To increase tragic among 
dealer outlets. Hoffman is spending S500 a week for time 
and talent jot his weekly, 15-minitte sportcast, "Hoffman 
Huddle" mid weekly forecast contest. Outstanding football 
figures are interviewed and predictions for the week's games 
are made. I iewers pick winners on contest blanks obtain- 
able only from Hoffman dealers. In four weeks, 2,695 
entries were received from the 35.000 TV sets currently in 
greatet /.m tngeles. ('ost per inquiry is less than $1. 

M I I \. I,.- Vngcles PROGRAM: "Hoffman Huddle" 



TV 

results 



TV SCREEN FILTERS 



SPONSOR: Pioneer Scientific Co. AGENCY: Cayton, Inc. 

I \i-M i.i: CASE HISTORY: On Friday, 15 October 1948, 

Pioneer used a one-minute announcement on II Rl \-Tl 
to introduce their Polaroid filter to It set tinners. \a- 
tional Television Co. teas identified as the Buffalo retail 
outlet. Sales icere SO satisfactory that on Sunday. 17 
October VTC repeated the spot at their own expense. 
Result: \'l(. sidd 75 Polaroid filters at prices ranging 
from between $10 $20. Ten T\ screen-enlarging lenses 
acre al^o sold to persons i isiling the store to see filters. 

W BEN-TV, Buffalo PROGB \M: L -minute announcements 



4 I OIIIIM. 



SPONSOR: Young-Quinlan VGENCY: Placed direcl 

i VPSUL1 • \-l HISTORY: ) oung-Ouinlan. Minneap- 
olis class specialty •-hue. joinedforces with KSTP-T) to 
telecast fust fashion show in Worthwest. I 'lot revolved 
around a dowdy secretary, who having attended a Young- 
Quinlan fashion show, learned how to dress and married 
the boss. Dramatic action was pantomimed by local 
models anil store personnel and narrated by KS I P's male 
and female fashion commentators. The one-shot hall-hour 

shou received hundreds of favorable comments and directly 

traceable business tun into the thousands. 

KSTP-TV, Minneapolis PROGR Wl: Fashion Show 



PAINT 



SPONSOR: Sustaining 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: "Vanity Fair.- which fea- 
tures fashion, personalities, and "how to do it yourself" 
information, premiered on Tuesday. 14 October. Peter 
Hunt, artist, during a ten-minute segment of the first pro- 
gram, demonstrated how to paint decorative peasant-style 
designs on plain furniture. He offered a booklet, pub- 
lished by du Pont, describing his methods of decorating 
furniture and paints used to the first 500 viewers ret/nesting 
it. liy the end of the week, he had received 1. 1112 letters. 

CBS " TV PROGRAM: "Vanity Fair" 



GAS AND OIL 



SPONSOR: Texas Company AGENCY: Kudner Agency, Inc. 

CAPSULE CASK HISTORY: In about eight months Texas 
Company's "Texaco Star Theatre" has become the highest 
rated regularly scheduled network program in the history of 
radio or TV with a telerating of 63.2. Program opens and 
closes with a service station quartet who stress Texaco 
senice. Commercials are woven into program format by 
street pitchman, a formula that has flushed sponsor identi- 
fication up to 95.5— an all-time high. Of the viewers who 
write in, 75% say they're snitching to Texaco products. 
NBC-TV PROGR VM: "Texaco Star Theatre" 



MEN'S HATS 



AGENCY: Grej Advertising 



SPONSOR: Disney, Inc. 

CAPS1 I.I ■: CASE HISTORY: Disney, makers of medium 
and high-priced men's hats, entered television by sponsor- 
ing a ten-minute weekly newscast. " \ RC Sews Revieic of 
the Week." Response from the retailers in the 21 cities 
where the program is telecast has been gratifying. Nine 
retailers have bought tie-in announcements either before or 
after the newscast. Others are expected to follow. The 
trend in hat sales volume for the field in general has been 
down. Hut not for Disney. 

NBC-TV PROGR Wl : "NBC News Review of the Week" 



TOOTH PAST! 



SPONSOR: Whitehall \(.l \< Y Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample 

< APS1 I I! CASE HISTORY: Starting in October. II hite- 
hall Pharmacol sponsored the second half of the Mil i 
half -hour program. "Small Fry Club." Slum features 
cartoons on film with live narration by Rob Emery. 
Children are encouraged to submit cartoons on safety siih- 
fects and these are shoicn on slides to the II audience. 
Once each program. Rob Pinery announced that Indian 
Skull Caps Would be Sent to children sending in 25 cents 

and a Kolynos box top. By the end of the 12 telecasts. 

orders for 15.000 caps had come in. 

\\ Mil). \.» York PROGRAM: "Small Fn Club" 



KMBC-KFRM 

Provides COVERAGE! 



earn 



NEBBASKA 




( 



Broken line shows Kansas City's primary 
trade territory as determined by Dr. W. D. 
Bryant, Kansas City researchist. 



Black lines show the proved 
.5 millivolt contour of KMBC 
and KFRM. 



The KMBC-KFRM Team is the only single 
Kansas City broadcaster to provide com- 
plete, economical coverage of the great 
Kansas City trade area. 
With programming from Kansas City, the 
Team has a potential audience within the 
proved 0.5 mv/m contour, as illustrated, of 
3,659,828 people ... all important consum- 
ers in this rich Heart of America market. 



Red shows concentrated KFRM listener area 
as determined by summer mail count on 
this station only. Mail received from 253 
counties in 11 states. 



The KMBC-KFRM Team provides, too, 
for the first time, valuable service to the 
listeners in this territory. Market broadcasts 
come direct from the Kansas City Stock- 
yards, grain, poultry and produce quota- 
tions are right up to the minute, and 
practical programs on agricultural prob- 
lems are daily features direct from the 
KMBC-KFRM Service Farm. 



The KMBC-KFRM Team Serves 3,659,828* People 



* 1940 Census 



7th Oldest CBS Affiliate 

KMBC 

OF KANSAS CITY 
5000 on 980 




Represented Nationally by 
FREE & PETERS, INC. 




OWNED AND OPERATED BY MIDLAND BROADCASTING COMPANY 

DECEMBER 1948 39 




"Is there a heart that music cannot 
melt? James Beattie, the Scottish poet, 
asked the question some 200 years ago. 
It was purely rhetorical, of course. He 
knew, as smart advertisers have since 
learned, that music melts all hearts . . . 
and lots of sales resistance, too. Ask the 
advertisers who use WQXR...the sta- 
tion that's all music and such good music 
that more than half a million New York 
families can't tear their cars away from 
it. They're choice families. . .the choicest 
in this choicest of all markets. Thev 
love good things as thev love good 
music . . . and can afford to buy them, 
too. If you've got something you'd like 
melted into the pure gold of profit... 
call Circle 5-5566. 



1 I \ ',' 



• 



AND WQXR-FM 
RADIO STATIONS OF THE NEW YORK TIMES 



THE FARM CIRCLE 

(Continued from page 28) 



ites, and novelty selections, with little or 
no swing or "cocktail" music. Live 
talent groups such as The Melody 
Rangers; The Columbian Singers (twelve' 
voice colored male chorus) ; The Crawford 
Brothers (gospel singers); Al Rogers 
(ballad singer), etc. together with records 
and two transcription libraries enable the 
station to keep their music like their 
listeners want it. 

The Rural Radio Network (Ithaca, 
N. Y.) is a major operation to reach rural 
audiences through FM broadcasting with 
programs designed strictly for them. 
RRN's whole approach to the programing 
problem is based on the study of local 
tastes and preferences. 

RRN, which carries no soap operas, has 
found their listeners like folk and western 
tunes provided they're well-performed 
and straight. To most of us, hillbilly, and 
folk or western, are identical, undis- 
tinguishable. Yet to lovers of Happiness, 
or Home on the Range the difference is 
marked and decided. But RRN audi- 
ences also like a certain amount of 
classical, semi-classical and popular music. 

It is worth noting that despite the over- 
whelming popularity of "oldtime" and 
religious music, there is much evidence 
of considerable listening among farm 
people to both classical and semi-classical 
music. 

A recent check of 20 of its stations on 
rural program preferences by the Paul H. 
Raymer Company, Inc., station repre- 
sentatives, brought out some interesting 
facts. The program research department 
tabulated results as follows: 

Western-hillbilly music took first place 
on 55% of the stations, while dramatic 
shows were first with 25% of the stations. 
Disk jockey programs of popular music 
were first on 10% and news and classical 
music on 5% of the stations. This is a sig- 
nificant variation of the national popu- 
larity ranking of such programs in the 
Department of Agriculture survey of 
1945, and serves to point up the important 
differences by individual areas. 

On second-place listings in the Raymer 
survey 35' ',' of the stations named drama, 
15% named news in a tie with hillbilly- 
western and popular disk jockey music. 
Ten per cent named classical music as 
second most popular. Another 10% of 
the stations reported classical music as 
third most popular with rural listeners. 

It is generally conceded by many sta- 
tion program people that popular net- 
work dramatic and variety shows pull the 
lion's share of rural audiences as they J<> 



in most other cases except where inde- 
pendent stations compete strongly with 
major sport attractions. 

Famous shows like The National Barn 
Dance (WLS), Grand Ole Opry (WSM), 
and others equally potent but less publi- 
cized don't compete against strong net- 
work lineups, since the hayride-hoedown 
type of show is commonly a Saturday 
night feature. They run from one to 
three hours with many different sponsors 
underwriting the various segments. This 
phenomenally successful format features 
a hearty give-and-take humor closely 
tied-in with the music. 

Farm audiences generally show a dis- 
tinct bias in favor of the less sophisti- 
cated, "cornier" type of drama and 
variety show*. 

*A January Sl'ONSOFt report will explore this p<tint. 



SMITH BROTHERS 

(Continued from page 25) 
that after years of selling their products 
together they would sell them separately. 
That policy is not likely to change. 

The lesson that Smith Brothers learned 
from their use of the Godfrey show was 
just the latest of a long series of trial-and- 
error experiences in radio. For Smith 
Brothers, their use of radio in most cases 
has been determined more by what they 
shouldn't use, than what they should. 

Actually, the Smith Brothers firm is one 
of radio's earliest advertisers. They came 
to radio in 1927, with an NBC show fea- 
turing "Scrappy" Lambert and Harry 
Hillpot, a Jones-and-Hare-type duo that 
sang comic ditties and did "blackout" 
routines for a half-hour each week. The 
show lasted through the seasonal cough 
cycles of '27-28, '28-'29, '29-'30, and 
came back in '31 '32. 

In 1031 they added another show, 
Trade and Mark, on CBS (and later on 
Blue) to bolster their campaign to try to 
make their cough syrup the number one 
seller. Trade and Mark were a pair of 
now-forgotten comics who acquired their 
radio names from the famous "Trade and 
Mark" pictures of the original bearded 
brothers, William and Andrew, that have 
been a standard item of Smith advertising 
since the 1870's. 

Both shows, like all Smith advertising, 
were on a purely seasonal basis. This was 
determined by the fact that the incidence 
of colds in the U. S. goes up to nearly 20% 
in the months between October and 
April, and drops back to 5% the rest of 
the year, almost disappearing in summer. 

Still another show made a brief appear- 
ance in that same ' 51 '32 season. It was 
the National Radio Forum, a Saturday 
(Please turn to page 56) 



40 



SPONSOR 




ABC 



DECEMBER 1948 



WJZ 



offers you ready-made audiences for 
your sales story with these popular 
programs of New York's first station 



CO-OP PROGRAMS 

You get the benefits of a big-time, coast-to-coast network show, 
yet you pay only the WJZ share of the total cost! The varied 
appeals of these shows give you almost pin-point selectivity. 



PIANO PLAYHOUSE 12:30 pm Sunday— Spar- 
kling piano music played by outstanding 
artists Cy Walter, Stan Freeman, Earl Wild 
and guest stars. Milton Cross, opera's dis- 
tinguished commentator, emcees. Now in its 
fifth year, this brilliant show has a big and 
steady following. 

MY FAVORITE STORY 3:30 pm Sunday — 

Ronald Colman is host and narrator, as well 
as star, in these dramatizations of literature's 
greatest stories, chosen as their favorites by 
famous folk of Hollywood. Mr. Colman has 
a supporting cast of outstanding screen and 
radio stars in this exciting, glamorous show. 



BREAKFAST IN HOLLYWOOD 2:00 pm 

Monday -Friday — Almost 10,000,000 people, 
an audience built up in seven years on the 
air, are daily listeners to this fun-fest. Jovial 
250-pound Jack McElroy is mc on a half-hour 
frolic. It's a program that assures your mes- 
sage a warm, friendly reception. 

BAUKHAGE TALKING 1:00 pm Monday-Friday 

— Superb reporting skill, accuracy and listen- 
able delivery have won this distinguished 
commentator his loyal following. 60 per cent 
of his sponsors are in their second, third or 
fourth year — because they've found how well 
this program sells for them. 



PARTICIPATING PROGRAMS 

You can link your product with exciting names and glamorous 
places — yet the cost is surprisingly low. And these popular 
WJZ shows produce results for you ! 



LUNCHEON AT THE LATIN QUARTER 1:35 pm 
Monday-Friday — Maggi McNeills and Herb 
Sheldon pack 'em in at the Latin Quarter — 
and they pack a terrific sales punch, too. 
They have a sincerity that puts your product 
across to their live and listening audience in 
a solid, convincing way. 



THE FITZGERALDS 8:15 am Monday -Saturday 

Ed and Pegeen originated a bright and spon- 
taneous style that weaves effective selling 
messages into interesting conversation. Their 
audience is not only large and loyal — but, 
what's most important, listeners go out and 
buy what the Fitzgeralds recommend 1 



Call the A BC spot sales office nearest you for information about any 
or all of these stations: 



WJZ — New York 50,000 watts 770 kc 
WENR — Chicago 50,000 watts 890 kc 
KGO — San Francisco 50,000 watts 810 kc 



KECA — Los Angeles 5,000 watts 790 kc 
WXYZ — Detroit 5,000 watts 1270 kc 
WMAL — Washington 5,000 watts 630 kc 



ABC Pacific Network 



American Broadcasting Company 



41 



1 








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trie man benind over ZUU successful sales curves 


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I' or the sponsor interested in sa/es. Singin' Sam presents a unique _ 


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opportunity. For never in radio's history has there been a personality 




... £, IP • • 1 1 ■• 




like 9am . . . never betore a program series with such an outstanding Si 




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— - record ot major sales successes unbroken by a single tailure. 




T^l 




I hese are strong statements that carry tremendous weight with 




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prospective program purchasers ... it supported by tacts. And facts , **' 




1*11 1 • 1 IT 1 1 




_______ __- W q nave in abundance • • . tngb Hoopers, congratulatory letters, ex- """"1 






















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42 



SPONSOR 







DECEMBER 1948 



43 



WMBD 



PEORIAREA 






H 






Local advertisers base their adver- 
tising on RESULTS ... and in the 
highly competitive Peoria market, 
local retailers buy more program 
and announcement time by far on 
WMBD than on any other Peoria 
station. Here's why . . . 

^ SHARE OF AUDIENCE 

Greater than all other Peoria sta- 
tions COMBINED! (Hooper Peoria 
111. Fall - \\ mt. r K. port. Oct.. 
1947 -Feb., 1948). 

^ PROGRAM Know-How 

^^^ Full stair orchestra ... I veteran 
newsmen . . . TA other program 
personalities presenting 14 hours 
live entertainment weekly. Total 
stall of t'.r. trained personnel. 

A PROMOTION AND 
W ^ MERCHANDISING 

FULL SCALE! 70 Announcemi nt- 
weekly . . . newspapers . . . car 
cards . . . displays . . . direct mail 
. . . merchandising publical ion. 

^ NEW FACILITIES 

New AM and PM power (5, 

watts AM with 20,000 watts KM 
at no extra cost) . . . increased 
coverage . . . new. modern theatre 
& studios. 

ASK FREE & PETERS 




IO West 52nd 

continued from page 6 



SPONSOR'S EBB 

Here I've been bragging about sponsor 
being the tops in its field. I have stated, 
without fear of contradiction, that the 
magazine's articles and editorials were to 
the point, excellently written and re' 
fleeted the considered opinions of ex- 
tremely erudite gentlemen. 

Now, look what I find! The phrase 
". . . murder broadcasts at a high ebb." 
I am utterly confused by the term "high 
ebb." Just what is a high ebb? Is it a 
new figure of speech with an indetermin- 
ate meaning? Perhaps it could be ap- 
plied to the columnists and commen- 
tators who predicted a Dewey victory. 
Maybe you could say ". . . they received 
the news of Truman's victory in silence 
and their feelings were at a high ebb." 
This, of course, would mean that they 
didn't know which end was up (or down). 

Perhaps you can enlighten me, for if 
it's a good phrase, I want to use it and 
not have people pointing me out as "that 
dumb cluck who doesn't know what high 
ebb means." 

C. Wylie Calder 

Manager 

WHAN, Charleston, S. C. 

p> SPONSOR'S face is ebb red.P 



We could certainly make good use of 
this article here in Canada to advance the 
use of transcribed shows on a regional or 
national basis. For that reason, we would 
like to order 200 reprints if they are avail- 
able, or ask your authorization to repro- 
duce the story with publication credits on 
our own. 

Don McKim 

Promotion Manager 

All-Canada Radio Facilities Ltd. 

Toronto 

► Reproduction rights (without deletion) have 
been granted All-Canada. 



MUSIC LIBRARIES 

As an executive of one of the transcrip- 
tion companies that was honored in the 
article entitled Don't Overlook the Music 
Library that appeared in your October 
issue I think it would be rather thought- 
less of me were I not to write and express 
my sincere thanks to you and sponsor. 

I am sure that other companies in the 
library business who were included in the 
article feel the same as I do and that they, 
as I, realize that this well-prepared article 
will go a long way towards correcting the 
misunderstanding that many radio sta- 
tions have regarding the use of library 
service. In my opinion, sponsor, through 
publication of this article, has done a 
great deal for radio. 

Bert Lown 

Station Relations Director 

Associated Program Service 

N. Y. 



PEORIA 

CBS Affiliate • S000 Watt. | 
Free A Peteri, Inc., Nat'l. Repi 



SKippy 

That's a terrific story you have in your 
September issue of sponsor on the suc- 
cess of the Rosefields in boosting Skippy 
Peanul Butter to the top on the sole 
strength of Skippy Hollywood Theatre. 



RESEARCH? 

Whose Face is red? 

"Beating the Gun" is a favorite Ameri- 
can pastime. Among others, many a pub- 
lisher was caught with his "pants down" 
in advertisements and material prepared 
in confident anticipation of a Dewey 
victory. 

The public, as well as the trade, has lost 
much of its faith in political polls. The 
natural aftermath of the poll prediction 
fiasco is bound to have serious repercus- 
sions on non-political research investiga- 
tions which have greatly benefitted 
American industry. For the moment the 
pendulum swings in the wrong direction. 
This is natural and understandable. 

For years, the three well-known politi- 
cal pollsters have enjoyed the popularity 
and prestige associated with accurate 
political preference measurements, despite 
their oft-expressed private opinion that 
some unexpected development or last 
minute change in the attitude of the 
voters might seriously upset their pre- 
dictions. 

These pollsters were well aware that it 
is extremely difficult to measure the 
emotional impulse of the public. 

The study of the human mind is in its 
infancy. It was only during the past cen- 
tury that science was able to solve the 
mystery of the location of man's brain. 
The practice of psychiatry is a compara- 
tively recent field of medical specializa- 
tion. 

It is unfortunate that commercial re- 
search may be somewhat temporarily re- 
tarded in its development because of the 
standpatness of the political pollsters in 
their prediction of a Dewey victory. But, 
it is conceivable that this situation may 
yet prove to be a blessing in disguise, and 
may eventually result in more sound 
methods to evaluate public opinion on 
issues which are exclusively emotional. 
A. Edwin Fein 
General Manager 
Research Company of America 
New York 



44 



SPONSOR 




There is no 2-way stretch in KFH coverage — it's 
5,000 watts ALL the time and it's the TOP audience 
station day and night. Every unbiased survey of 
listening habits gives KFH the TOP rating in 
the Wichita trading area by a large majority. 



5000 Watts - ALL the time 



Source of Data: THE KANSAS RADIO AUDIENCE OF 1948 
• An unbiased survey of the entire state conducted by Dr. F. L. 
Whan in one out of every 75 homes in Kansas * 6,611 families 
reporting divided: 2,256 on farms, 1,762 in villages, 2,614 urban 



KFH 



CBS 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY EDWARD PETRY & CO., INC. 



WICHITA, KANSAS 



DECEMBER 1948 



45 



WIP 

M voduces 




The Huberman Jewelry Stores in Phila- 
delphia, Lebanon, Pa., and Camden, 
New Jersey, have sponsored "Midnight 
Bandwagon" on WIP since 1944. A 
full hour, midnight to 1 a.m. Monday 
through Saturday, the program has not 
only definitely increased traffic in all 
three stores but has stepped up the 
sale of higher priced merchandise. 



A 



WIP 

JPli Uadelph iu 
Basie Mutual 



HvprvHvntvtl Nationally 
by 

EDWAIIll PETRY & I O. 



MR. SPONSOR ASKS 

(Continued from page 36) 

work and its affiliated stations with con- 
centrated promotion of his own radio 
program. 

A case in point: CBS recently prepared 
a promotion campaign for a hard-goods 
advertiser. Our campaign was complete. 
It included on-the-air promotion: an- 
nouncements, recordings, promotion pro- 
grams, tie-in announcements, etc. It in- 
cluded visual promotion: newspaper ad 
mats, billboards, car cards, taxi cards, bus 
cards, posters, window displays, etc. It 
included national exploitation. It in- 
cluded a full-scale local publicity cam- 
paign, supporting the national campaign 
conducted by our own Press Information 
Department. And it included some 
product merchandising helps for stations. 
In turn, this advertiser paid for and 
distributed about 200,000 copies of a 
merchandising piece we had prepared for 
his use. He took newspaper spotlight 
ads, backing up the newspaper advertis- 
I ing our stations had given his show. He 
I used magazine advertising to promote his 
i show. He used gimmick mailing pieces; 
| he used direct mail pamphlets; he pre- 
pared posters for his dealer's use. 

The result: his program now rates 
among the ten most popular programs on 
the air. And he's been sponsoring it less 
than six months. 

Neal Hathaway 

Director of Program Promotion 

CBS, New York 



J 




46 



Advertising can 
create the desire 
for a product or a 
service in the mind 
of the consumer. 
Merchandising 
can convert desire 
into action — the 
follow-through at 
the point of sale— 
and since sale of 
merchandise or service is the ultimate 
goal of media, a well-rounded plan of 
merchandising is the answer to many 
clients' problems. 

Each product or service has a definite 
need for one or more types of merchan- 
dising service. Perhaps, a point-of-sale 
display installed in the individual retail 
outlets featuring product, price, and ad- 
vertising is the answer, or, a call on the 
retailer to tell the client's product story, 
plans, and media tie-in. Cooperative ads 
with groups or associations of retailers 
(Please turn to page 50) 

SPONSOR 




THE name of Austin Noblitt's store in Rockville, In- 
diana, is misleading. Actually, "hatchery" represents 
but a small part of the business. Starting with a hatchery 
in 1941, Noblitt has since added home appliances, hard- 
ware, garden tools, radios, feeds and seeds, building 
supplies and toys! Today, the Noblitt Hatchery store is a 
tribute to a mans— and a town's progressive belief in the 
future. 

Mr. Noblitt, after leaving Purdue University in 1928, 
worked on farms and in towns catering to rural folks. 
Prior to opening his own store he lived for five years on 
a farm in Parke County, of which Rockville is the county 
seat. He knows the people— their likes, habits and ambi- 
tions. He knows, too, the power of WLS among these 
people. That's why in his present business he makes a 
point of stocking WLS-advertised products. According 
to Mr. Noblitt, demand increases when products are 
WLS-advertised. 




Figures bear out WLS popularity in Parke Counts. 
BMB gives WLS number one spot — 86% day, 82% night. 
In 194.7 the 3,840 radio families in this county sent WLS 
2,559 letters . . . 67% response! Parke County represents 
a thriving market — over 8 million dollars in retail sales, 
$14,200,000 effective buying income. 

Like Austin Noblitt, WLS, too, knows these people. 
For over 24 years this typical Midwestern county has been 
served, entertained and advised bv the powerful voice of 
WLS. The) have reacted with loyalty, acceptance and 
belief— the basic ingredients of advertising results. 

WLS has 567 such counties in its BMB daytime coverage 
area. Any John Blair man can tell you the complete 
market story. 



90 KILOCYCLES • 50,000 WATTS • ABC AFFILIATE • REPRESENTED BY JOHN BLAIR & CO 

DECEMBER 1948 47 






Thanks for the orchids 







Hi 



ifcfi 




THANKS to Broadcaster's Guild, Inc., for making its own survey among a large, 
representative group of radio stations ... a survey which determined the re- 
lative position of transcription library services on several different points. And . . . 



THANKS to Billboard magazine for printing the results. 



According fo the Billboard article: 



STATIONS, WHEN ASKED 
WHICH SERVICE THEY 
WOULD ADD, VOTED: 



1st choice — LANG-WORTH 

2nd choice— Library A 
3rd choice— Library B 
4th choice — Library C 
5th choice— Library D 
6th choice— Library E 



STATIONS, WHEN ASKED 

WHICH SERVICES THEY 

MAY DROP, RATED: 

1st choice — Library E 
2nd choice— Library B 
3rd choice— Library G 
4th choice — Library A 
5th choice— Library H 



In the Billboard report Lang -Worth was not even listed 
among libraries which may be dropped 



■ i 



K2H 

9Rh 



■ 







ENDORSED BY 826 ADVERTISERS! 



SALES have been sensational for every item advertised . . . automobiles, 
food, drugs, dry goods, tires, insurance, jewelry, paints, clothing, radios 
and many others ... all promoted by LANG-WORTH programs! 826 
advertisers endorse the selling power of these shows . . . they've heard 
them in action. Everything about them is NETWORK CALIBRE . . . 
everything but their local station cost. 

To begin with, LANG-WORTH talent is tops! The stars that sell 
your product are nationally recognized, big-time names, with tested and 
proven audience appeal. Furthermore, the basic idea and program format 
are both solid and surefire . . . while production and writing sparkles with 
showmanship ... the kind of "know-how" that lifts your show right up 
alongside the finest running mate you'd hear anywhere on the air, coast 
to coast. 

Small wonder, then, that among radio station operators . . . "with 
men who know transcriptions best" . . . it's Lang-Worth! 



Foremost in a series of special production shows 
offered to all LANG-WORTH stations are: 




THE CAVALCADE 
OE MUSIC 



Top-flight entertainment featur- 
ing 35-piece pop-concert orchestra 
and 16-voice chorus under the 
direction of D'Artega. Spotlights 
a galaxy of all-star guest acts, 
such as Tommy Dorsey, Anita 
Ellis, Vaughn Monroe, the Modernaires, Tito Guizar, Frankie 
Carle and many others. The most dynamic musical show on 
transcription. 30 Minutes, once weekly. 



JLXP ? 




THE EMILE COTE 
GLEE I'M II 



A class-appeal program with a 

universal audience, as shown by 

the most consistently high Hooper 

ratings of any transcribed feature. 

A male Glee Club of 16 voices, 

with soloists Floyd Sherman, Stanley McClellan and Percy 

Dove, presents a repertory of more than 200 best-loved 

popular melodies. 15 Minutes, 5 times weekly. 




MIKE MYSTERY 



Murder, mystery, suspense and 
music ... an irresistible audience 
potion combined in a 15 minute, 
5 weekly format that's guaranteed 
to blow the top off your sales 
chart! A snappy two-minute 
"Whodunit", incorporated in the 
show, gets itself solved right after your advertiser's product 
is sold. Written exclusively for Lang-Worth by Hollywood's 
Howard Brown. 




THROUGH THE 
LISTENING GLASS 



Another favorite musical hit show, 
with the "Silver Strings", under 
the direction of Jack Shaindlin 
and featured weekly appearances 
of those musical stars, the LANG- 
WORTH Choristers and a pageant of guest artists: Dick 
Brown, Joan Brooks, Johnny Thompson and others. 30 
Minutes, once weekly. 



For a full listing of Lang-Worth affiliated 
stations, see your representative or write 



LANG-WORTH feature programs, inc. 

Network Calibre Programs at Cocal Station Cost 

STEINWAY HALL • 113 WEST 57th STREET • NEW YORK 19, N. Y. 



MR. SPONSOR ASKS 

{Continued from page 46) 

and chains are of material help. Publica- 
tion of a trade merchandising newspaper 
featuring displays and merchandising aids 
to the retail outlets in the sale of all 
products helps promote better merchan- 
dising on all products. Special retail and 
wholesale mailings telling the media sup- 
port story on the product will help make 
the retailer more conscious of the things 
to come and help him to become mer- 
chandising conscious and increase sales. 
Distribution checks, consumer and dealer 



attitude surveys, competitive position 
checks to help the client to better under- 
stand his position in the area, materially 
help for a better understanding on local 
problems, which, when corrected, add 
stimulus to sales. 

These are a few of the 25 merchandising 
services that we of WLW offer our clients 
and which we have found to be of great 
value in promoting the sale of products 
and services using our facilities, either 
local or network. 

J. M. ZlNSELMEIER 

Director of Merchandising 
' WLW, Cincinnati 




PUT THE 

Three - Car Gatrace 
Over there f 




X up, our North Dakota yokels 
have it iiuod in the Red River 
Valley hi?j crops that make an 
average Effective Buying Income 
of $5599 per family, compared 
with $4567 for the eon n ties we 
don't cover in this Slate! (Sales 
Management, 1948.) 

Riimi now. farmers around Far- 
go buy more than 125 national 

products advertised over WDAY. 

\\ hatever you've gol to adver- 
tise, WDAY in its 26th year con- 
tinues to be the top-notch medium 
in this fabulous Worth Dakota irea. 
Wrilr n>« lor details lo«la\. 




FARGO, N. D. 

NBC ■ 970 KILOCYCLES 
5000 WATTS 




r™vi' 



Free & Pottos. Ik. 

I nhutoi N<n tonal K»fr f ,rnui«n 



SALES MANAGERS 

(Continued from page 33) 

the latter must continue to be an after- 
the-fact report. They look upon CBS's 
"TV test city" and Newell-Emmett's 
"Video City," as good ideas for pre-test- 
ing television's commercial approaches, 
but adding up all available research 
facilities for pre-testing of sales-impact of 
broadcast advertising, art, and copy, dis- 
cover at the best only "straw-in-the- 
wind research." 

"We must stop using expensive pro- 
grams and costly air time to experiment 
with our broadcast advertising," explains 
a drug sales manager. "We can't go on 
indefinitely like Standard Brands with 
big audiences and little direct sales im- 
pact. (SB decided they can't do it either 
this year.) As we get closer and closer to 
an all-out buyers' market, the need for 
testing commercial appeal, before we air 
our programs, becomes more and more 
vital. Most of the advertising men we've 
had with us feel that broadcasting is a 
creative art that mustn't be shackled by 
research or sales. I think they're plain 
nuts," he concluded. 

"There's something vitally wrong with 
(Please turn to page 54) 



LOOKING FOR 
PROGRAMS? 

Mosfloca/ ■ 
$to#s- Beat t 



SeRVMG- 

OMAHA & 
Council Bluffs 



BASIC ABC • 5000 WATTS 
Represented by 

EDWARD PETRY CO., INC A 



50 



SPONSOR 



UNIFORM TV RATE CARDS 



RATE CARD Ho. 3 
active Sept- 22.1 



a**^**^ 



Stat** 



<0*va& 



|ff CARD No. 2 
Active Nov. J, J948 






' ^KATZ COBP°BAJ»° N 

BALKAN & ^ G 

C H » c ZZ- — 






Don't overlook the sales promotional punch that Paramount TV 
Stations — backlogged by 36 years of entertainment know-how — 
can deliver as needed in the important Midwest and Southern 
California trading areas. Paramount Video Transcriptions — sight- 
and-sound film-recordings of your tele-shows — make selective TV 
schedules possible and budget-smart. 

If our Rate Cards have not reached your desk, please ask for them. 



****** 




^^^J^riy^rocUur/i^nsS^ 



DECEMBER 1948 



WBKB 



Balaban & Katz TV Theatre 



KTLA 



Your Star Salesman in Hollywood 

Hollywood Studios • 5451 Marathon Street • HOIIywood 6363 

Chicago Studios • 1 90 North State Street • RAndolph 6-8210 

New York Offices • 1501 Broadway . BRyant 9-8700 



KEY STATIONS OF THE PARAMOUNT TELEVISION NETWORK 



Represented Nationally by Weed and Company 



51 







o 

I 



Albuquerque 

Beaumont 

Boise 

Buffalo 

Charleston, S. C. 

Columbia, S. C. 

Corpus Cbristi 

Davenport 

Des Moines 

Denver 

Duluth 

Fargo 

Ft. Worth-Dallas 

Honolulu-Kilo 

llouslon 

Indianapolis 

Kansas City 

I .ouisville 

Milwaukee 

Minneapolis-St. Paul 

\.u ^ ork 

Norfolk 

Omaha 

Peoria-Tuscola 

Tor (land, Ore. 

Raleigh 

Boanoke 

San Diego 

St. Louis 

Seatil'- 

Syracuse 

Terre Haute 





KOB 




NBC 




kl DM 




ABC 




KDS1I 




CBS 




WGR 




CBS 




WCSC 




CBS 




WIS 




NBC 




KRIS 




NBC 




woe 




NBC 




who 




NBC 




KVOD 




ABC 




\\ I )SM 




ABC 




WDA"i 




NBC 


IS 


\\ HAP 




ABC-NBC 




KGMB-KHBC 


CBS 




K\YZ 




ABC 




WISH 




ABC 




KMBC-K1 KM 


CBS 




wa\ i: 




NBC 




\\ \1 \\\ 




ABC 


Paul 


WTCN 




ABC 




WMCA 




IND 




\\ Gil 




ABC 




KFAB 




CBS 




WMBD-WDZ 


CHS 




Kl \ 




\H< 




\\ I'TF 




\ BC 




WDBJ 




CBS 




k^DJ 




CBS 




kSD 




Mil 




KIBO 




CHS 




WFBL 




CBS 




WTH1 




\H< 




Television 






Baltimore 




\\ \ \M 




Ft. Worth 


Dallas 


WBAP-TV 




1 ouisville 




\\ \\ E-TV 




New York 




WPIX 




Peoria 




\\ MBT 




St. Louis 


1 


KSD TV 





52 



SPONSOR 




* 





INDED 



T L 



RADIO 



i\sk your Sales Manager (or an\ 
client's Sales Manager) "how things 
are going" and you'll probably find 
that there are (1) some markets where 
everything is perfect, (2) some on which 
he is dubious, and (3) some about which 
he is frankl\ worried. 

If lie had extra sales-personnel avail- 
able, he would undoubtedly spot it, 
with greatest care, in those markets 



where greatest effort is needed. 

Why isn't it possible to do the same 
with radio? // is. That kind of radio 
is called "national spot" It is sales- 
minded radio, the Kind in which Free & 
Peters has specialized since 1932. If 
you'd like to discuss national spot for 
any of the markets listed at the left, 
you'll find thai we are sales-minded, 
too — for your sales. 



FREE & PETERS, inc. 

Pioneer Radio and Television Station Representatives 

Since May, 1932 



ATLANTA 



NEW YORK 
DETROIT FT. WORTH 



CHICAGO 
HOLLYWOOD 



SAN FRANCISCO 



DECEMBER 1948 



53 






P* Swing is toW inKansasC^, 



IT'S A 




Sure there's a Santa Claus, and 
don't let anybody talk you out of it! 

As a buyer of radio time, how'd 
you like to wake up to find thorough, 
wide coverage, ace showmanship, comprehensive 
merchandising and promotion — all in one stocking? 

Try this on your Christmas tree: WHB is a 10,000- 
watt station spang in the heart of the golden Kansas 
City Marketland, dominating a listening area of 120 
counties in 5 states. The enviable WHB reputation 
for sales results is founded on fact. 

Santa Claus? Why, considering what you get, WHB 
is practically giving time away! 

P.S. — For a Happy New Year, see your John Blair man! 



10,000 WATTS IN KANSxj 



DON DAVIS • 

rtuiDiNi ft 




r KtMJ 

, -k r~>r~H john t schilling _^ 

^m | III ennui iiimcii ^ 



MUTUAL NETWORK • 710 KILOCYCLES • 5,000 WATTS NIGHT 



SALES MANAGERS 

(Continued from page 50) 

market research's integration with broad- 
cast station coverage information," points 
out another sales manager. "If this 
weren't so, how can you account for a 
spot radio (sponsor calls it selective 
radio now) campaign being planned by 
our agency which covers only 60% of our 
important sales territories? 

"It was only after we had been on the 
air for four weeks that our district sales 
managers began to file vigorous objections 
to the fact that there were districts in which 
our announcements weren't being heard. 
Our district men in a great number of 
cases started promoting our 'wide' broad- 
cast advertising coverage to jobbers only 
to have the jobber say 'we haven't heard 
any radio advertising in our area.' When 
the district man pulled our station line-up 
out of his pocket, the jobber frequently 
gave him the needle with 'who told you 
anyone around here listens to that 
station.' 

"When I go to our advertising manager 
with our district manager's complaint, he 
checks with our agency and discovers that 
the station's BMB (Broadcast Measure- 
ment Bureau) figures prove that the sta- 
tion has an audience in the area. I've 
checked personally and found that the 
station in question frequently does have a 
relatively high BMB figure and yet ap- 
pears to have no acceptance with our 
wholesalers or dealers. I don't care what 
a station's rating is on a once-a-week 
listening basis, I want to use stations that 
have a consistent day by day, hour by 
hour audience. (Daily listening figures 
are part of the data being gathered in 
BMB's second survey, 1949.) If our ad- 
vertising department is to have the re- 
spect of our field sales staff, it can't afford 
to buy media which don't cover a sales 
area." 

Few sales managers like the programs 
or announcements their firms purchase. 
They admit they have the "last word" but 
that they aren't advertising men and 
must accept the recommendations of 
their agencies and ad-heads. 

"If I upset the advertising depart- 
ment's apple cart, I usually end picking 
up damaged fruit," reported the sales 
manager of an automotive accessory ad- 
vertiser. When it comes to attempting to 
carry both the sales and the advertising 
burden, it's the smart sales executive who 
battles with his advertising department 
but who doesn't attempt to take over 
1(H)' , of the ad-responsibilities. No mat- 
ter how ad-minded he is, he's far too close 

(Please turn to page 56) 



54 



SPONSOR 



~T5 Mp i 



0% 



*& 



Tfva/JLcfc 






OFFICES IN 

NEW YORK 
CHICAGO 
LOS ANGELES 
SAN FRANCISCO 



JOSEPH R. FIFE 

Commercial Manager 

WPTR 



A 




WPTR. 



PATROON BROADCASTING COMPANY • HOTEL TEN EYCK • ALBANY, N. Y. 






DECEMBER 1948 



55 



SALES MANAGERS 

(Continued from page 54) 

to sales picture to be objective about pro- 
motion. Since he sits in the driver's seat, 
he can yell for what he wants and let the 
other fellow do it. When a sales manager 
finds himself falling short of his quota, 
he's liable to forget everything but — 'sell 
that product,' which I'll admit often isn't 
good long term policy. However, adver- 
tising managers seem too captivated by a 
nicely turned phrase and a beautiful air 
performance than by what the commer- 
cials do. There can be onlv one marker 



for an>- advertising — that's sales effec- 
tiveness." 

Sales managers want results. What 
impresses them is the acceptance which 
their advertising achieves with jobbers 
and retailers. They like high rating pro- 
grams, even if they won't admit the fact. 
If they did they'd have to admit that ad- 
vertising was as important as sa'esman- 
ship. Prestige is admired but as something 
extra — something to be polished for "top 
brass." "Broadcast advertising," say a 
number of hard working sales managers, 
"must be important. My wife listens to 
it all the time." * * * 



There's Plenty of 'Cream 

in America's 

Dairyland 

and you can get your 
share with 

WISCONSIN'S 
MOST POWERFUL 
RADIO STATION 



Here is the station that, without am addi- 
tional help, can tell your story, sell your 
products in the rich dairylands and the 
capi tal citj ol W isconsin. 



» » 




M. II. S. MI III V I I ; 



MADISON, WISCONSIN 



lor the facts on the \\ kUW market write 

Monona Broadcasting <io.. Madison •'!. Wis. 

Represented bj llr.AI>I.KY-l{K.I.I» COMPANY 



SMITH BROTHERS 

(Continued from page 40) 

night 15-minute round table on current 
events. It was an attempt by Smith to 
reach another segment of listeners with a 
show that was a direct contrast to the 
other two. The show was much too 
talky for listeners' tastes. Its rating was 
microscopic. 

In 1934, Smith Brothers did an about- 
face in their air advertising. The late 
Arthur G. Smith, father of the present 
brothers (William 1 1 and Robert ) who 
run the business today, decided that the 
Trade and Mark show was not in keeping 
with the dignity of a firm like Smith 
Brothers. 

When the new year came around, Smith 
Brothers were sponsoring Nat Shilkret's 
Orchestra, a 15-minute capsule musical 
show on Sunday nights. This was more 
to the liking of the elder Smith, but it was 
not much in the way of a sales producer. 
The main fault of the show was that it 
was colorless, plus the fact that it came at 
an hour that was too late to attract much 
listening. Its 13-week run on Blue lasted 
from January through March 1934. 

In 1934, business was better for the 
Smith Brothers, and for the cough drop 
industry in general. The post-crash 
(Please turn to page 78) 



NOW! 




jf2. COUNTIES OF 

prosperous f4nrkTivoin Land 

ILLINOIS • IOWA • MISSOURI 
NATIONAL REP. -JOHN E. PEARSON CO. 



□mo 



JfuL*&£ lAatuMrtA 



1070 KC 

1 I 1 1 1 LJU U 1 1 



IOOO WATTS •/ n IT f 



56 



SPONSOR 




Nighttime 




Radio Fom 


% 


3,512,750 


952 


125,100 


3.4 


43,750 


12 



3,681,600 99 8 



NYONE can see from this map how VBC covers 
the ( loasl. I )arkest areas indicate counties or sub-countv 
areas where impartial, publishedBMB figures show that 
50% or better of all radio families listen regularh to AB( '.. 
(That lonel) white spot is the one count \ outol 1 1 i where 
less than 10"' of the radio families have the ABC habit 



B 




Additional cities ond towns in 
which ABC Pacific now has an 

estimated 50% (or moiej BMB 
penetration due to new sta- 
tions and improved facilities. 



c 




OVERAGE of all the Coast audience worth ha\ ing 
is assured by the strategic location of ABC stations. And 
of the two networks currently offering worthwhile avail- 
abilities. ABC is the one that leads in average Hooperat- 
ings. audience promotion and number of high-ranking 
shows. It's smart to talk to ABC before you buy. 



i t i ii vi isn't w.i.! See how ABC deliver- the 
hade centers — big and little, outside and inside Here 
we show 12 towns listed by BMB where 50". or more of 
all radio families listen regularly, day or night to ABC 
...plus o towns where ABC station improvement has 
raised listening levels to an estimated 50% or better. 



On the coast you cant get away from 



ABC 



FULL COVERAGE ... ABC's improved facilities have 
boosted its coverage to 95.4% of all Pacific ( loasl radio 
families (representing 95?6 ol coast retail sales) in coun- 
ties where BMB penetration is 50% or better. 
IMPROVED FACILITIES ... \BC. theCoasl"s Most Pow- 
erful Network, now delivers 227,750 watts ol power— 
54,250 more than the next most powerful network. This 
includes fouk 50,000 waiter-, twice as man) as an\ 
other coast network... a 3 1"" increase in facilities during 
the pa-l year. 

GREATER FLEXIBILITY... You can focus your sales 
impact belter on ABC Pacific. Buv as few as 5 stations. 
or as many as 21— all strategically located. 

LOWER COST... ABC brings you all this at a cost per 
thousand radio lam i lies as low as or lower than an v other 
Pacific Network. No wonder we say— whether you're on 
a Coast network or intend to be, talk to ABC. 

THE TREND TO ABC. ..The Richfield Reporter, oldest 

newscast on the Pacific Coast, moves to ABC after 17 
years on another network, and so does Greyhounds 
Sunday Coast show— after 13 years on another network. 



ABC 



PACIFIC NETWORK 

New York: 30 Rockefeller Plaz« • Circle 7-S700-Detroit: 1700 Stroh Bldg. • CHrrrv 8321— Chicaco: 20 N. W.cker Dr. 
DEUware 1900-Los Awceles: 6363 Sunset Blvd. • Hudson 2-3141-Sai* Fra.nc.isco: 155 Montgomery St. • EXbrook 2-6544 






DECEMBER 1948 



57 



GREETING CARDS 

(Continued from page 35) 

plant and started advertising in earnest 
using magazines and newspapers. They 
plugged their cards in women's maga- 
zines, and promoted their "Eye-Vision" 
display fixtures (now standard in 85% 
of America's greeting card shops) to both 
the trade and the public. 

By 1939, Hall Brothers had come up 
with several innovations. They were the 
first (and still the only) firm to obtain 
licenses to use the Walt Disney charac- 
ters on their cards, as well as famous 



comic strip characters like Blondie, L'il 
Abner, Mopsy and others. They were the 
first major company to design and pro- 
mote a line of cards that appeal to men. 
At this point they were among the 
largest firms in their field. They could 
have stopped there, just as other greet- 
ing card companies stopped. 

Joyce Hall, for all his conservative, 
mid-Western dignity, is a great salesman. 
He began to look around for a selling 
tool that would boost his sales even 
higher. He found it in radio. 

In October of 1940 he bought Tony 
Wons' Scrapbook on a small network of 



OKLAHOMA CITY'S 
ONLY.... 



50,000 WATT 
STATION 





For best results in the rich central and western 



sections of Oklahoma tie your message to a 50,000 



watt signal that is heard by OVER 1,370,000 Okla- 



homans who spent OVER $855,739,000 in retail 



sales during 1947. 



JOE BERNARD 

GCHCRAL MANAGER 



AVERY KN0DEL, Inc. 

HATIOHAL KCPRtSEHTATIViS 



NBC stations. Wons' dreamy style of 
reading poetry to the accompaniment of 
organ music looked as though it might 
be a natural tie-in. Didn't Hallmark 
cards have verses on them? Wons began 
to read Hallmark greeting card verses in 
a come-hither voice to his predomi- 
nantly female audience. Hall Brothers, 
who were virtually getting a I5-minute 
commercial out of the 15-minute show, 
began to note sizeable sales increases. 
The show continued to pull well up to 
the time it left the air in May of 1941. 
Then the war came, and Joyce Hall, 
realizing that war-separated families 
would probably be sending each other a 
lot of greeting cards, bought a half-hour 
show on the old Blue Network (now 
ABC) called Meet Your Navy. He was 
right. Sales nearly doubled for the 
greeting card industry during the war, 
and were it not for the paper shortage, 
would have gone even higher. 

In 1944, Hall Brothers decided to try 
a big-time comedy show, and bought the 
Charlotte Greenwood program on ABC. 
For two years it did fairly well, until 
Hall had a chance to buy the Radio 
Reader's Digest, a half-hour dramatized 
version of the Digest's current stories on 
(Please turn to page 64) 



Just What The 
Doctor Ordered 




MODERN HOME PHYSICIAN publisher! 
bought WDNC, the SOOO watts— 620 
kc CBS station in Durham, N. C. Results? 
lOOO books sold per month! 

What do you want to sell more 
of at lower cost? 




58 



DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 

The Herald-Sun Station 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Rep. Paul H. Raymer 

SPONSOR 




Westinghouse radio stations. . every 
■one of them. . leaped ahead in a de- 
cisive way in 1948. 

AHEAD in number of radio homes 
(potential audience) reported in 
every station area. (5 to 16 per- 
cent ahead!) 

AHEAD in program-building, to attract 
and hold bigger audiences. 

AHEAD in the down-to-earth selling 
which keeps renewals coming in, year 
after year. 

AHEAD with Stratovision. . blazing the 
television trails of the future. 

AHEAD with Boston's magnificent new 
Radio and Television Center, one of 
the first to bring all facilities under a 
single roof; and with the first tele- 
vision service in New England. 

AHEAD with expanded FM service on 
all six stations, and with lofty new 
towers for KDKA-FM in Pittsburgh 
and KYW-FM in Philadelphia. 

AHEAD in Portland — KEX is the only 
50,000-watt station in Oregon. 

AHEAD in the Midwest; at WOWO in 
Fort Wayne, alert, heads-up program- 
ming and promotion have averaged 
one Industry Award every 7 weeks 
for more than 30 months. 

Advertisers, some of them with us for 
more than 16 years, saw sales leap 
ahead, too! If you were not one of them, 
make a resolution to peg time on these 
fast-moving Westinghouse stations be- 
fore it's too late. NBC Spot Sales has 
full information. 

(Sj) WESTINGHOUSE 
RADIO STATIONS Inc 

KDKA • KYW • KEX • WBZ • WBZA • WOWO • WBZ TV 
National Representatives, NBC Spot Sales 
except lor KEX; for KEX, Free and Peters 



DECEMBER 1948 



59 



another WHAS First! 




the only radio station $£RI///V(rh\\ of the 



60 



SPONSOR 



r he FIRST Credit Earning College Course 
broadcast by a Standard Commercial Station 




Radio has tried but at 
>esl lias enjoyed only 
modest success in edu- 
cational broadcasts. To meet this challenge 
the University of Louisville and W'HAS 
undertook a radical innovation in broad- 
casting— '"'College hv Radio.'' 

The idea was logical, but the pre-course 

reparation represented months and months 
>f hard work. Starting in 10 i" 7 , actual class- 
Dom sessions were painstakingly recorded 
md re-recorded until at last the idea shaped 
into a workable format . . . eight months 
iter "College by Radio" went on the air. 

No one at W'HAS had any illusions about 
these broadcasts rating high in a Hooper 
eport. But at W'HAS we take "Service" ser- 
Ously. With "College by Radio" another 
crvice has been given our listeners, and we 
iope, a pioneering step taken toward making 
(radio more effective and useful to its audience. 



REPo 



KT 



C ARD 



" A *»e coy 

,s ° notcu, Corn ^u n ; 

bilk gre °t Q „ H,af >er Sd„ esid *nt 

° r '"ore wid , d "* facing < ° ^°, rp 
time.- ' de 'y >han i s Co * S of ° c // eqp r * s P°nsi- 

° mm ^ytrue a g f l edUCQt! on 

"Sting i s 



ch Kentuckiana Market 




DECEMBER 1948 



50,000 WATTS 1 -A CLEAR CHANNEL 840 KILOCYCLES 

Victor A Sholis, Director J. Mac Wynn, Sales Director 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY EDWARD PETRY AND COM PA NY 

61 



selective 
radio 
trends 



Based upon the number of programs and'an- 
nouncement: placed by sponsors with stations 
and indexed by Rorabaugh Report on Sel- 
ective Radio Advertising. Reports for August 
'47-July '48 are averaged as a base of 100 



Expected upsurge in selective broadcast advertising did not materi- 
alize in October. Nationwide the index was off 1 point from Septem- 
ber. Drugs and Miscellaneous increased their use of the medium to 
offset the usual seasonal decrease in the Beverages and Confectionery 
classification. Food regional and national selective broadcasting has 
steadily declined since August from 88% of the 12 month 1947-1948 
average to the October figure of 81. There is little expectation that the 
food trend will reverse itself during the next few months. Decrease in 
business placed in the Pacific and Rocky Mountain areas was offset in 
part with moderate increases in the New England, Mid- Western and 
Southern territories. Fact that October was a pre-election month may 
account for unsatisfactory showing. November looks better but . . . 



Per cent 



250 — 
200 — 
150 — 
100 — 
50- 



AUG SEP I OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL 



Based upon reports from 237 * Sponsors 





A u9 47 — j u i y 48 ave'age = l000% 



Trends by Geographical Areas 1948-1949 



AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL 



250 

200- 

150 



100 

50 



2,280,000 Radio families 



□dd 



250 
200 
150 
100 
50 



9,166,000 Radio families 



200 

150 

100 

50 



25Q. 11,387,000 Radio families 



EL 



250 
2001 
150 
100 
50 



6,399,000 Radio families 



250 - 
2G0- 
150- 
100- 
50 



72 77 71 



4,766,000 Radio families 



77 101 If 



■'■■■'■ 



■■-■..■'-'■'A 

New England 



47— 48 average = 1000% 



Middle Atlantic 



M»d-Westem 



Southern 





Trends by Industry Classifications 1948-1949 

81 Sponsors reporting 



AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FES MAR APR MAY JUN JUL 



16 Sponsors reporting 



and toiletries 




Food 



*Fo* this total a sponsor is regarded as a single 
be reported under a number of classifications. 



corporate entity no matter how many diverse divisions it may include. In the industry reports, however, the same sponsor may 



62 



SPONSOR 




from music 
and movies . . . 
to pucks 
and pigskins 



There's never a dull moment for WWJ-TV's 
Detroit audience. Symphony and popular music. 

children's and women's programs, full length movies, 
Red Wing hockey games, University of Michigan 
football games, wrestling matches, prize fights, 
special news events . . . through WWJ-TV's own 

facilities, through the NBC Midwest T elevision 
Network, and soon through the NBC National 
Network. Every day is a busy day lor 
WWJ-TV's staff, and an enjoyable one for 
Detroiters who are keeping television manufacturers 
hopping to catch up with the demand. 



WWJ-TV, first television station in 
Michigan, is an ESTABLISHED advertising 

medium producing gratifying results lor 
its many advertisers in a market that is 

currently one of the High-Spot cities of 
the nation . . . with a backlog <>l orders 

for new cars that foretells a prosperous 
future, as well. IT'S WORTH 

LOOKING INTO! 



FIRST IN MICHIGAN 



Owned and Operated by THE DETROIT NEWS 



National geprnenlalivti: THE GEORGE P. HOLLINGBERY COMPANY 
ASSOCIATE AM-FM STATION WWJ 



UJUJj-w 



NBC Television Network 



DECEMBER 1948 



63 



GREETING CARDS 

(Continued from page 58) 

CBS. This continued until June of 
1948. During the summer vacation of 
the show, the replacement, Hallmark 
Playhouse with James Hilton, did so well 
ratingwise that Hall decided to keep on 
with Playhouse. 

The show is done in somewhat the 
manner and style of Lux Radio Theater, 
i ring half-hour adaptations of famous 
stories Hilton has selected with Holly- 
wood stars playing the lead roles. Hil- 
ton acts as host-narrator on the show. 



and helps out on the commercials, which 
stress the Hallmark theme of "When you 
care enough to send the very best." It 
is primarily a low-pressure, reminder-type 
of advertising. Only the Hallmark Dolls 
are promoted in anything other than 
general terms. 

The show costs Hall Brothers about 
$1,500,000 a year for time and talent. 
This is about half of the Hall ad budget. 
The remainder is spent in magazine ad- 
vertising in Post, Lije, Esquire, Vogue, 
etc., and in some newspaper spreads 
around Christmas. Hall Brothers will 
-kiss around $15,000,000 this year, so 



c 



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^p° U /i? COn '''" u e to 



BROADCAST MUSIC, INC. 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD 



the advertising budget amounts to 20%. 
This may sound high, but Hall feels that 
results justify it. 

Although Joyce Hall is no seeker for 
personal publicity, he is a great believer 
in publicity and promotion for his firm 
and its products. Carl Byoir, New York 
and Hollywood press agent, is under con- 
tract to Hall, and many of the Byoir- 
inspired Hall publicity stunts have paid 
off well in industry prestige. 

Last Christmas, Hallmark cards were 
featured in a WCBS-TV show called 
CBS Christmas Card, which sent rhymed 
greetings to everybody from CBS spon- 
sors to the United Nations. Each rhyme 
was illustrated with a Hallmark card, 
the first promotional tie-in for a greeting 
card firm in television. More recently, 
Hallmark displays have been set up at 
teachers' conventions (to plug the Hall- 
mark dolls as an aid in teaching geogra- 
phy) and the small fry members of the 
U. N. Club of Washington have been 
photographed dressed in the style of 
their parent country featured on the 
Hallmark cardboard dolls. Luana Pat- 
ten, cover girl of the Hallmark album in 
which the dolls are collected (The album 
sells for 50c, the dolls for 25c), has been 
featured in movie lobbies in connection 
(Please turn to page 72) 

' MORNING J 

! AFTERNOON 

I AND 

NIGHT . 

_W H H M_ 

DELIVERS 
I 

- MORE LISTENERS 

| PER DOLLAR 

| IN 

1 MEMPHIS 



64 



SPONSOR 




BLA 



KET 



S THI 



LAS-FT. WORTH MARKET! 



KKET 



1 



And our good friend Mrs. Broadbeam 
only proves how complete coverage can 
be. Certainly she needs better facilities. 
In Texas there's a rich and fast-growing 
market, modern engineering and 
transcription facilities and 26 years' 
experience in programming. So whether 
you're selling cosmetics, tractors, or 
dog food, you'll choose WFAA. 



Represented Nationally 
EDWARD PETRY and COMPANY 




TEXAS QUALITY NETWORK 

Radio Servite of the Dallas Morning News 

ly Ord*, of FCC, WFAA Sh„,„, Tim. on Both f,, 




DECEMBER 1948 



65 



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Yeah, but can he lift a sales curve? 



Sure he can. But Mr. Claus does it only once a year for his clients, 
whereas CBS, by delivering from 8 to 57% more listeners per dollar invested 
than any other network in radio, helps lift the sales curves of its 
advertisers week in and week out the year round. 

The Columbia Broadcasting System 



i 



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Citation" at America's Tracks,— 
Station WHEC In Rochester 



....FIRST BY LENGTHS! 




WHEC is Rochester's most-listened-to station and has 
been ever since Rochester has been Hooperated! 

Furthermore, Station WHEC is one of the select Hooper 
"Top Twenty" stations in the United States! 



laleit Hooper before closing time. 



STATION STATION STATION STATION STATION STATION 

WHEC B C D E F 

MORNING 38.8 25.7 8.3 3.9 

8:00-12:00 A.M. 
Monday through Fri. 



AFTERNOON 37.5 30.0 11.4 

12:00-6:00 P.M. 

Monday through Fri. 

EVENING 31.6 27.2 10.6 

AUGUST-S 

Latest before closing time. 



6:00-lQ:00 P.M. 

Sunday through Sat. 



5.0 
9.0 



15.0 6.8 
10.4 5.2 



BUY WHERE THEY'RE LISTENING:- 



Station 

1 (-. Broadcasts 

O.r till Sunset 

AUGUST-SEPTEMBER HOOPER, 1948 



MEMBER GANNETT 
RADIO GROUP 




of^^e^t 



N. Y. 
5,000 WATTS 



Representatives: J. P. Mc KINNEY & SON, New York, Chicago, HOMER GRIFFITH C O ., Los Angeles, San Francisco 



DECEMBER 1948 



71 



GREETING CARDS 

(Continued from page 64) 

with her part in Disney's Melody Time 
and has been a guest on KTLA's tele- 
cast Who's That Girl? where one of the 
clues to her identity was a shot of the 
doll album with her name masked out. 
The company's contract artists come 
in for their share of publicity too. On 
Grandma Moses' 88th birthday not long 
ago, she and fellow-Hallmark artist, Nor- 
man Rockwell, were featured in a big- 
full-color spread in Lije. The piece even 
featured a Hallmark Gallery Artist card 



by Grandma Moses, with a name-credit 
for Hall. 

Hall's latest promotion effort is the 
"Hallmark Art Award," a total of 
$25,000 which will be given, like the 
Nobel Prize, to the best American and 
French contemporary paintings of 1949. 
The awards will in all probability be 
announced on Hallmark Playhouse, and 
the tie-ins with Hallmark cards will be 
considerable. Joyce Hall is well aware 
that such promotion stunts, keyed care- 
fully to his air and space advertising, are 
necessary to insure the continued success 
of the firm as the industry sales leader. 



■m 



K/\ 






y 



*&* 



1 



TEXAS' No. 

SPORTS 
STATION 



#134 HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL GAMES— The Ford 

Motor Company 

• WORLD SERIES Gillette 

• ALL-STAR FOOTBALL GAME Wilson Sporting 

Goods Company 

• "FISHING 4 HUNTING CLUB OF THE AIR"— Pearl 

Beer 

• ALL-STAR BASEBALL GAME — Gillette 

• EAST-WEST FOOTBALL GAME and NORTH -SOUTH 

FOOTBALL GAME— Gillette 

• 12 SOUTHWEST CONFERENCE FOOTBALL GAMES 

The Humble Oil <f Refining Co. 

• 8 NATIONAL FOOTBALL GAMES Mutual Broad- 

casting System 
THE MEL ALLEN SHOW — U. S. Army Recruiting 
FOOTBALL PREDICTIONS by LEAHY OF NOTRE DAME 
HORSE RACES Every Week from Mutual 
EDDIE BARKER'S "SCOREBOARD'' (Six Nights 

Weekly) M. F. Fischer ,\ Son 

• TEXAS OPEN GOLF TOURNAMENT — Canada Dry 

• NATIONAL GOLDEN GLOVES FINALS— The U. S. 

Army and U. S. Air Force 

• NATIONAL PRIZE FIGHTS — Ballanline's Ale and 

Beer 

• ANNUAL NATIONAL 500-LAP MIDGET AUTO CLASSIC 

• INDIANAPOLIS 500-MILE RACE The Perfect Circle 

Company 

• BROADCASTS DIRECT FROM THE OLYMPICS 

• TEEN-AGE RODEO —The Twenty-Thirty Clubs 



Mutual in San Antonio 

KMAC-KISS 

Howard W . Davis, owner 

Represented Nationally by 

JOHN E. PEARSON CO. 



The firm that is the runner-up for top 
sales honors, the Gibson Art Company 
of Cincinnati, is also a successful user of 
air advertising — on a national selective 
basis. Gibson, like Hall, makes and sells 
a wide line of greeting cards and gift 
wrappings, and expects to gross some 
$9,000,000 this year. 

Its advertising appropriation of 
$250,000 is for the most part spent in 
176 newspapers, but in one market, Bos- 
ton, it uses little or no newspaper adver- 
tising and concentrate its efforts on 
an air show that is as much a part of 
Boston as the Old North Church. The 
program is WEEI's Uncle Elmer's Song 
Circle which Gibson has sponsored con- 
tinuously in its Sunday morning 8:30-9 
a.m. slot since August, 1945. Gibson 
has had previous radio advertising in a 
few markets, using women's participat- 
ing shows, but has never had anything 
like the success it has had with Uncle 
Elmer. 

The show is a blend of cracker-barrel 
philosophy and nonsectarian hymns by a 
choir of 18 voices. Elmer Herskind, who 
is host on the show, receives more mail 
than any other WEEI show — commer- 
cial, sustaining, network or local. Be- 
fore Gibson bought it in 1945, the show 
(Please turn to page 74) 



-THE KEY TO 



(Mt/kfoi7 l{innescta 




MINNESOTA'S TRIPLE MARKET 



72 



• 350,000 INTERNATIONAL visitors 

• 34,000 METROPOLITAN residents 

•£ 87,200 RURAL consumers in the primary 
coverage area. 

EVERYONE VDAf Minn. N.rworlc 

DIALS TO nilVV N w N,.iwo,L 

Southern Minnesota's Oldest Radio Station 

Established 1933 

IN ROCHESTER, MINNESOTA 

Nationally represented by the John E Pearson Co. 

SPONSOR 



we're ready to sing YOUR sales song too! 




j PACIFIC NORTHWEST BROADCASTERS 



WASHINGTON SEATTLE-KING ELLENSBURG-KXLE SPOKANE-KXLY OREGON PORTLAND-KXL 
MONTANA Z NET BUTTE-KXLF HELENA-KXLJ BOZEMAN-KXLQ GREAT FALLS-KXLK MISSOULA-KXLL 



THE WALKER CO . 551 5th AVE . NEW YORK 
841 National Building, Minneapolis, Minnesota 
15 West Tenth Street, Kansas City, Missouri • 



360 N. MICHIGAN AVE., CHICAGO 
» Little Building, Boston, Massachusetts 
333 Candler Building, Atlanta, Georgia 



DECEMBER 1948 



73 



GREETING CARDS 

. 72 

had been running continuously on WE EI 

$2 During that time. Elmer 
had been building up a tremendous local 
following for his show, traveling the 
members of the choir around to church 
_ ups and meetings 

It was the great p polarity of the star 
that decided the purchase of the show 
by Gibson. The tie-in seemed like a good 
one. since listeners to Uncle £/•-:. 

ere the type that did the greatest 
spreei buying. 

'.d that manv of their 



sales results from I i been 

of the indirect variety. The show has 
done a good job of breaking down sales 
resistance on the part of buyers and 
dealers in the New England area reached 
by WEEI. Elmer still travels hundreds 
of miles each year, singing at gatherings 
from Nantucket to Nova Scotia and he 
always adds a plug for Gibson. He 
usually drops in on the nearest Gibson 
dealers when he's on the road, and writes 
letters to them when he's in Boston. 
When he's not writing letters. Gibson's 
promotional staff is. Gibson features 
Elmer in nearly every major presenta- 



SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA'S PiOHe&l RADIO STATION 




TFie market in WDBJ's total BMB coverage 
area represents 35.73^j of Virginia's t<>t<d buying 

power. \nil T. ( »i»' , of West Virginia's. 

In 50 < , or better BMB coverage \\ DBJ sells to 
23.7* of Virginia's 1 »n > iiiij power. \-k FREE & 
PETERS! 



CBS • 5000 WATTS • 960 KC 

Om*d and Operated by th* 
TIMES-WORLD CORPORATION 

ROANOKE. VA. 

FREE 4 FETERS INC. Nationa. Repr*senta:.es 



rion and merchandising push in the N\w 
England an 

Man) have suggested to Gibson, at 
one time or another, that they transcribe 
Elmer's show and place it in several mar- 
kets. Gibson has wisely refrained, even 
though they like the effect oi Elmer on 
the New England sales curves. Elmer 
is a New Englander. and his brand of 
philosophy and his twanging accent 
would probably fall flat in the South or 
West. Just as network disk jockeys 
have laid a rating egg every time they've 
been tried, a show like Gibson's which 
depends on the personal success and 
popularity of a local personality fre- 
quently succeeds only in its own baili- 
wick. Gibson may add other local shows, 
but only if Gibson feels they can do the 
job locally that Uncle Elmer's Song Cir- 
does in New England. 

Like Hall Brothers. Gibson's have 
found that radio changes buying habits. 
Where people once shopped for their 
greeting cards by appearance only, now 
they look on the back of the card for the 
maker's name as well, and frequently 
ask to see only the cards made by the 
firm whose air commercials they have 
heard. 

The third of the four major greeting 
card firms. New York's Norcross, Inc., 



FIRST 

IN THE 



QUAD 



TIyoCce4- 



DAVENPORT 
ROCK ISLAND 
MOLI N E 

EAST 
MOLINE 

The 40th 

Retail 

Market 




L) 



A M 5.c:3W„U20Kc 

TV 



C P. 22.9 K» > > 
uol and ourol, 
Choanal^ 



BASIC NBC Affiliate 
DAVENPORT,IOWA 

National Representatives 
Free & Peten, Inc. 



74 



SPONSOR 



is adding the plus of sight to sound broad- 
casting. The big firm, which is expected 
to gross around $7,000,000 this year, is 
the first greeting card company to buy 
TV time. Since last September, they 
have been conducting a series of test 
campaigns on three stations — Chicago's 
WGN-TV, Buffalo's WBEN-TV, and 
Milwaukee's VVTMJ-TV. 

Their video commercials have been 
one-minute announcements, using a series 
of slides showing Norcross cards, plus 
live narration. The results so far have 
been inconclusive, although a free offer 
of a booklet on WTMJ-TV brought a 
mail return that ran to 10 f ^ of the avail- 
able TV sets at the time the offer was 
made. 

The TV test campaign is also Nor- 
cross' first planned usage of broadcast 
advertising. Hitherto they had been a 
newspaper advertiser, spending up to 
$175,000 a year for newspaper space, 
billboards, trade ads and mailing pieces. 
Norcross is not fully decided as to 
whether they intend to continue their 
TV selling on a year-round basis. Indi- 
cations are that if the tests prove pro- 
ductive of sales, TV will be used on a 
wider scale. 

Rust Craft Publishing Company, a di- 
vision of the United Printers and Pub- 




for 
HOT INFORMATION 

on 
TOP STATIONS 

In 
TOP MARKETS... 



ask your 

JOHN BLAIR 

■ai! 



JOHN 
BLAIR 

l COMPANY 




REPRESENTING LEADING RADIO STATIONS 
Offices in Chicago • New York • Detroit 
St. Louis • Los Angeles • San Francisco 

DECEMBER 1948 



lishers, Inc., is the fourth largest greeting 
card company with annual sales this 
year expected to top S5, 000,000. Rust 
Craft has been a great believer for years 
in the "one-shot" type of advertising. 
This usually amounts to a pair of back 
covers 'in color; on Life magazine, which 
costs Rust Craft some 5 50,000 for the 
pair. 

Rust Craft has used radio once. That 
was in the Christmas season of 1944, 
when Rust Craft took time out from its 
magazine advertising space was hard to 
buy in 1944- to sponsor a half-hour one- 
shot version of Dickens' Christmas Carol 



on the morning of 24 December on 209 
Mutual stations. The show cost Rust 
Craf >r time, and abort 

for talent, and was highly institutional 
in its selling approach. That it was 
great success should not surprise most 
radio men. The Christmas one-shot 
show has worked well for Elgin National 
Watch Company for several years, be- 
cause Elgin has made it a tradition. 
Rust Craft's Christmas Carol was done 
with little prior promotion, and no radio 
tradition behind it. Since the 1944 trial 
run, Rust Craft has used no other radio. 
Please turn to J 



SURE. 

some C-hica^o stations 

can be heard in South Bend 
. . . but the audience 

LISTENS 

to wsbt: 



There's a whale of a big difference bet 
"reaching" a market and covering it! Some 
Chicago stations send a signal into South 
Bend — but the audience listens to WSBT. No 
other station — Chicago, local, or elsewhere — 
even comes close in Share of Audience. 
Hooper proves it. 







5000 WATTS • 960 KC • CBS 
PAUL H. RAYMER COMPANY • NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 

75 







Based upon the number of programs and an- 
nouncements placed by sponsors on TV sta- 
tions and indexed by Rorabaugh Report on 
Television Advertising. Business placed for 
month of July 1948 is used for each base 



Network TV business, due to increased activity on the middlewest webs, 
jumped to 250% of the base month (July) during October. Even in sponsor's 
constant base of 10 cities and 15 stations increase in business was over 100% 
from 59.2 to 129. (Base month had an index of 58. ) This is the first month in 
which network'business increase was at a more rapid pace than local retail but 
even local-retail TV advertising practically doubled in October — jumping from 
93.6 to 180.6. In sponsor's constant base for local-retail (10 cities 19 stations), 
the increase continued at the previous ratio from 75.9 in September to 93.6 in 
October. In National and Regional Selective TV advertising, where the use of 
the medium has been erratic, business jumped from September's 1 10 to 140.8 in 
October. Tobacco leads in the use of TV on a selective basis but Radio, TV, 
and Appliances leads the local-retail TV index and runs second to Soaps and 
Toiletries on networks. 



BREAKDOWN OF TV BUSINESS BY CATEGORIES 



"TOTAL" AND TEN-CITY TRENDS 



CATEGORY JUNE JULY AUG SEPI OCT NOV DEC JAN FEI 



JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC JAN FEI MAR APR MAY 





Gray area: total units of business 
Base month: July = 1M.0 c /c 



Black area: constant base 
ol 10 cities, IS stations 



100 



NATIONAL & REGIONAL SELECTIVE 



148 8 



110.0 




Gray area: total units ol business 
Base month: July = 100 % 



Black area: constant base 
of 10 cities, 19 stations 



LOCAL RETAIL 



Gray area: total units of business 
Base month: July = 100.0 95 



Black area: constant base 
ol 10 cities. 19 stations 



America's Model 
Television Station 



Reports on one year 
of programming 




WTMJ-TV has built its program- 
ming on the premise that local 
and national spot programs were 
as important as network pro- 
grams. As a result, many of the 
most popular WTMJ-TV 7 programs originate in the television 
studios of Milwaukee's Radio City. They include . . . 

THE GRENADIERS 

Milwaukee's most popular radio program, skillfully adapted to 
television, occupies the Wednesday night 8:00 to 9:00 P.M. slot. 
Complete with a 16-piece orchestra, vocalists, and comedy. It 
captures the Milwaukee television audience with a format 
built to the City's tastes. Participating sponsorship. 

"PLAY 'EM OR PAY 'EM" 

This 15-minute Friday night musicale feature challenges the 
television audience to submit song titles which cannot be played 
by the Radio City Quintette. This heavy mail pull program is 
under participating sponsorship. 

VIDEO VARIETIES 

Top mid-western talent is featured on this Sunday night 7:30 
to 8:00 P.M. feature, one of Milwaukee's favorite television 
programs. Participating sponsorship 

T.V. TRYOUTS 

The proved pulling power of amateur programs is combined 
with skillful production to make top flight television entertain- 
ment out of this Saturday night 7:15 to 7:45 feature. Partici- 
pating sponsorship. 

OTHER LOCAL FAVORITE PROGRAMS 

The same skill and production facilities that have built 
WTMJ-TV participating programs are also available to national 
and spot advertisers for the presentation of programs ideally 
suited to individual needs. 

WTMJ-TV is a complete RCA 
Victor installation. 

Because studio remote and 
transmission facilities are de- 
signed for one another, WTMJ-TV 
is transmitting a picture that results in quality reproductions 
of programs and commercials. 

The WTMJ-TV dial position on Channel 3 assures good re- 
ception with any standard tvpe antenna. 





caUei 

3S3 ; - '•" 1 

3 "---:;:.... ■ 

made ^ ^J te \ e vision stat 
fast growing 



Sales of television sets in the 
Milwaukee area have exceeded 
even the most optimistic predic- 
tions. As of November 1, there 
were over 9,000 sets in Milwaukee 
and total installations are ex- 
pected to exceed 12,000 units by January 1. Combined with the 
high listenership in the Milwaukee area, this means an audience 
of in excess of 100,000, or 10% of Greater Milwaukee's total 
population for most evening programs. Little wonder then that 
television has grown far beyond the experimental stage in 
Milwaukee and is now recognized as an effective, economical 
hard-hitting sales medium. 

Over two-thirds of the sixty na- 
tional, spot and local sponsors 
who have tried WTMJ-TV today 
remain as successful television ad- 
vertisers. All three of Milwau- 
kee's leading department stores 
have been on WTMJ-TV since its inception and all have dra- 
matic success stories using the station. Local and network 
advertisers selling everything from automobiles to food products 
are obtaining results from WTMJ-TV. With the bulk of installa- 
tions being in middle income homes, WTMJ-TV is delivering a 
valuable and growing list of reception homes to its advertisers. 

NETWORK AFFILIATIONS 

WTMJ-TV is affiliated with NBC, CBS and ABC. As the link 
between the mid-west and eastern network closes, the facilities 
of WTMJ-TV will be available to the users of these three net- 
works. 

WORTH REMEMBERING 

When making your plans for television, remember this . . . 
WTMJ-TV, Wisconsin's only television station delivers a large 
receptive audience to the network, spot and local advertiser. 

wtImj-tv 



SUCCESSfUjJ 
ADVERTISER^ 




THE MILWAUKEE 

Affiliated 
National Representativ 



URNAL TELEVISION STATION 

h NBC, CBS and ABC 

Petry & Company, Inc. 

HANNEL 3 



DECEMBER 1948 



77 



WNJR 

presents 

THE JOHNNY 
CLARKE SHOW 

9.05 A.M. to 12:00 Noon 
Monday through Saturday 
This outstanding selling team 
of Johnny Clarke and WNJR 
will carry your message to 
a million North Jersey homes 
. . . one of the richest mar- 
kets in the country. 
Represented by AVERY- 
KNODEL, Inc. 




GREETING CARDS 

(Continued from page 75) 

There was a historical basis, however, 
for Rust Craft's Christmas broadcast. 
In 1931, the Greeting Card Association 
of New York, a trade group, sponsored 
Charles Hackett, Tenor, on 24 CBS sta- 
tions for two 15-minute broadcasts dur- 
ing the Christmas season. The show cost 
the Association $4,288 for time, and a 
$1,000 or so for talent. Hackett sang 
Christmas carols, and the commercials 
dealt with some institutional selling for 
greeting cards. It produced good results 
in a few markets, but the show was never 
followed up to form a once-yearly listen- 
ing habit. 

There have been few other uses of 
broadcast advertising to sell greeting 
cards. A few small firms, like the Merit 
Card Company of Chicago, have bought 
announcements during the Christmas 
season, instead of their usual classified 
ads, to seek door-to-door agents, usually 
offering to send a "kit" of supplies and 
instructions to those sending in a letter 
or postcard. The balance of the industry 
spends from a few hundred dollars to 
$5,000 yearly for a few trade ads and 
newspaper ads in the Christmas and 




This is a little extra coverage we throw in! 
All kidding aside, here's our formula — 5000 
watts on 550 kilocycles, and a 704 foot an- 
tenna with a location right in the center of 
the best soil conductivity area in the U. S v 
plus 23 years of good programming, give 
us unbeatable coverage and listening. 



KFYR 



550 KC 5000 WATTS 
NBC AFFILIATE 
REP. JOHN BLAIR 



Bismarck, No. Dakota 



Valentine seasons. Only the large firms 
can afford to print the full line necessary 
for a big business in "everyday" cards. 

Just as radio and TV have helped 
establish mounting brand consciousness 
in the buying of Botany fabrics, Teen- 
timer dresses, and a list of other prod- 
ucts and services where consumer pur- 
chasing in the past has been on a hit- 
or-miss basis, they have brought brand- 
name buying to the greeting card busi- 
ness. 

The fact that more radio and TV 
should be used by the greeting card 
industry than is employed now is partly 
the fault of the broadcasting industry. 
The average greeting card publisher 
knows very little of what broadcasting 
can do for his product. Until he is shown 
direct sales results, broadcast advertising 
of greeting cards will be confined to the 
few large firms now using it. * * * 



SMITH BROTHERS 

(Continued from page 56) 
slump reversed itself, and Smith had more 
money to spend. They bought another 
musical show, this time a better one, 
called Songs You Love. The show was 
much along the lines of the American 
Melody Hour and featured syrupy ar- 
rangements of old-time song favorites. It 
did better than the previous shows, be- 
cause its Sunday night (,9 9:30 p.m.) spot 
on NBC made for increased listening. 

A third musical show, Melody Matinee, 
followed Songs You Love in the first part 
of '36, and later in '36-'37. This was a 
straight music show (no vocals) that held 
down a spot in NBC's Sunday afternoon 
schedule. It was again more successful 
than its predecessors, and due to better 
business conditions generally in the cough 
drop industry showed sales upturn that 
ran in some cases as high as 50 C A '. But 
all in all the results were mild. 

For the next two seasons ('37-'38, 
'38-39) Smith Brothers decided on a 
change of pace in their advertising. For 
one thing, their network usage had not 
been particularly successful. For an- 
other, there was an industry recession 
that showed its beginnings in late '37 and 
continued through '38. The advertising 
budget, based at Smith Brothers on ap- 
proximately 10% of the anticipated case 
sales in a good year, was curtailed to the 
point where they couldn't afford to try 
their hand again at network radio. At 
least, not for a while. 

Tlu' recession ended during '39, an J 
sales began to i limb again to near-normal 
conditions lor Smith Brothers in all sec- 
tions of the country . . . except one. 

In November of 1940, Smith Brothers 



78 



SPONSOR 



»1Vi 

BILLION 

DOLLAR MARKET 

spread over two states 



Take our BMB Audience Cover- 
age Map, match it with the 
latest Sales Management "buying 
power" figures, and you'll see 
that KWFT reaches a billion and 
a half dollar market that spreads 
over two great states. A letter 
to us or our "reps" will bring 
you all the facts, as well as cur- 
rent availabilities. Write today. 



KWFT 



THE TEXAS-OKLAHOMA STATION 

Wichita Falli— 5,000 Wattl— 620 KC— CBS 

Represented by Paul H. Raymer 

Co., and KWFT, 80.1 Tower 

Petroleum Bldg., Dallas 



WDEL 



WGAL 



WKBO 



WRAW 



WORK 



WEST 



Established 1922 
WILMINGTON, DEL. 



Established 1922 
LANCASTER, PA. 

Established 1922 
HARRISBURG, PA. 

Established 1922 
READING, PA. 

Established 1932 
YORK, PA. 

Established 1936 
EASTON, PA. 



Rep'ttenied by 

I ROBERT MEEKER 
ASSOCIATES 




Chicago 

San Francisco 



New York 
Los Angeles 



started sponsoring a cycle of regional 
newscasts on the Columbia Pacific Net- 
work that lasted seasonally through 
March 1943. The news shows were 5- 
minute evening reports, featuring in turn 
"name" newscasters like Knox Manning, 
Boh Anderson, Dick Joy, and Nelson 
Pringle. Results were quick in coming, 
and within six weeks sales of Smith 
Brothers cough drops on the West Coast 
started upwards. 

Once the West Coast was holding its 
own saleswise, Smith Brothers shifted 
back to straight selective radio. This 
time they threw off another outmoded 
notion (a hangover from their days with 
the Tarcher agency) and stopped their 
"live" announcements in favor of e.t.'s. 

One day, early in May 1948, Shaw came 
to New York accompanied by W. W. 
Smith for the weekly client-agency huddle 
over the results of some copy-testing. 
Smith left early, since he had an appoint- 
ment downtown with the Smith Brothers 
at SSC&B. Shaw was talking with 
Jack Sullivan when Don Stauffer came in. 
Stauffer had some news. He had just 
been given the pitch for a new ABC- 
Lou Cowan package, Stop the Music. 

Shaw, who has much more freedom 
than the average advertising manager 
(Smith Brothers is not run by a large 
board of directors and stockholders, but 
by the original family), was sold on the 
idea. At worst, he decided, they would 
only be out the cost of Stop the Music for 
a 13- week cycle, and they could always 
return to their national selective selling. 

There has never been any question of 
dropping the show after a 13-week 
period. Smith Brothers expects to carry 
it for a full 26-week period well into 1949. 
The major problem currently for Smith 
Brothers, aside from the industry con- 
troversy over give-away shows, is one of 
holding their franchise on the show during 
the summer months of 1949. Vp Shaw 
says wryly that he feels like an apart- 
ment-dweller in a "No Vacancies" build- 
ing whose lease may expire when he needs 
it most. 

Smith Brothers' success with Stop the 
Music is the end of a long trail for the 
cough drop firm. They have learned in 
radio, often the hard way, that they must 
sell their products separately. They have 
learned that they must do their selling by 
means of an advertising medium in gen- 
eral, and a program vehicle in particular 
that has a mass appeal. 

Above all, Smith Brothers has learned 
that radio, properly controlled and well 
handled, can produce sales for the smaller 
advertiser as well as the multi-product 
giants with eight-figure budgets. * * * 



ON THE DIAL 



IN LISTENING 



IN NETWORK 



WSJS 

LEADS 



DAY AND NIGHT 



NORTH CAROLINA'S 

RICH TRI-CITY 

MARKET 



• WINSTON-SALEM 

• GREENSBORO 



HIGH POINT 



WRITE FOR OUR BMB FOLDER 













DECEMBER 1948 



79 



signed and unsigned 



Advertising Agency Personnel Changes 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Clifford Botway 
Buell Brooks 
Clarke R. Brown 
John Brush 
Pal < urry 
Charles (). Dahney 
Vic Decker 
Sherwood Dodge 
Mildred 15. Dudley 
Sydney B. Gaynor 
Norman Gladney 
I.. I). Griffith 
Henry Howard 
( .linn Kyker 
Si uarl I). 1. uillum 

Jean Meredith 
George R. Nelson 
James I*. Newtown Jr 
Arthur I'ardoll 
Ken Pearson 

(,. AUx Phare 

Peter Piper 
Mori Postier 
Paul Radin 

B. A. Rc:nis 

U Ullam .1. Sagstettcr 

Rill Schurr 

Norton II. SobO 

Gordon A . Speedie 

Dale II. Theobald 

Phil Waters 
Harold H. Webber 

W. V Wilkinson 



Julian Goss. Hartford Conn., radio dir 



KDAC. Fort Bragg Calif ., part owner 
\\( \l . Phila.. publ dept 

WC.M W . Canton Ohio, com ml mgr. sports dir 
Foote, Cone & Belding, N. Y.. research dir 
WDWS, Champaign III., announcer, producer 
Don l.ee Broadcasting, F. A., gen sis mgr 
Huher, lloge, X. Y., radio dir, acct exec 



McCann-Erickson, N. Y., radio, TV comml dept 

head 
CBS. H'wood., asst dir press information 
Eeighton & Nelson. Schenectady N. Y., partner 

Young & Rubicam, N. Y. 

CVA Corp. S. !•'.. mdsg mgr 

R. C. Smith. Toronto, radio dir 

Makelim. H'wood., pub rel dir 

Friend, N. Y. 

Buchanan, H'wood.. vp in chge West Coast 

motion picture div 
Lynn-Fieldhouse, N. Y. 

Stockman Magazine, Memphis, managing ed 
Packard, Phila. 
Khrlich & Neuwirth, N. Y., acct exec 

Van Dorn Iron Works Co, Cleve., adv, sis prom 

mgr 
Homer Griffith, H'wood., acct exec 
Foote, Cone & Belding, N. Y., vp, natl media, 

research dir 
Foote, Cone & Belding. L. A., acct exec 



J. B. Sebrell, L. A., radio dir 

Erwin, Wasey, L. A., media dir 

Gardner. St. I-., radio, TV dir 

Henry von Morpurgo, L. A., TV dept head 

Gray & Rogers. Phila.. radio. TV dept 

Presha. Fellers & Presha, Chi., radio. TV dir 

Vic Decker (new). Canton Ohio, head 

Same, vp in chge media, research 

John \\ . Shaw . Chi., timebuyer 

Raymond R. Morgan, L. A., vp 

Casper Pinsker, N. Y.. radio dir, acct exec 

Sherman & Marquette, N. Y., TV research dir 

Jack Berman, N. Y., TV dir 

Powell Grant, Detroit, radio, TV dir 

Marschalk & Pratt, N. Y., contact with Staiulard[Oil' Co 

(N. J.) 
Benton & Bowles, H'wood., radio publ mgr 
George R. Nelson (new), Schenectady N. Y., head 
California Transit Advertising, L. A., acct exec 
Sullivan. Stauffer. Colwell & Bayles. N. V., timebuyer 
Same, gen mdsg, adv mgr 
Same, managing dir 
Curt Freiberger. Denver, radio dir 
Mort Posner (new). S. F., head 
William kt sti r. L. A., vp 

Federal. N'. Y., acct exec 

Ritchie. Houston, acct exec 

Earle A. Buckley, Phila., acct exec 

Same, vp 

Tippett, Jackson & Nolan, Boston, acct exec 

Campbell-Sanford. Cleve., vp 

Butler-r.mmctt. Portland Ore., radio, TV dir 
Same, Chi., acct superv 

Same, vp 



Sponsor Personnel Changes 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Norman R. Anderson 
W. F. Armstrong 

Frank T. Ja< obfi 
Frederick M. I.inder 
Edward I.. Mabry 

S. N. Mays 

Neil II. Me I lroy 
Howard .1. Morgens 
V\ llliam I . Ni \ iu 
I.. J. Noonan 
Joseph A. O'Malley 

I) (.. Russell 
Olin A. Saunders 
Charles A \\ iggins 



Telecoin Corp, N. Y., mdsg mgr 

General Motors Corp, Detroit, vp in chge mfg, 

real estate 
William S. Merrell Co, Cinci., sis prom mgr 
Jacob Ruppert Brewery, N. Y., vp 
Vlck Chemical Co, N. V., exec asst to pres 
General Motors Corp (Chevrolet Motor div), 

Detroit, business management dept head 
Procter & (iambic Ce>. Cinci.. vp, gen mgr 
Procter eSt Gamble Co, Cinci., adv dept mgr 
Dorville Corp. N. Y., vp 

Stokely-Van Camp Inc. Indianapolis, gen sis mgr 
Chrysler Corp (Chrysler div). Detroit, asst gen 

sis mgr 
Superior Coach Corp. Lima O.. acting adv mgr 
Borden Co. N. Y. 
General Foods Corp (Calumet Baking Powder 

div), N. Y., assoc sis, adv mgr 



General Foods Corp (Minute & Certo div). N. Y.. sis. adv mgr 
General Motors (<rp (Chevrolet Motor div). Detroit, gen 

mgr 
Same, aelv, sis prom dir 
Same, exec vp 
Same, pres 
Same, sis prom mgr 

Same, pres 

Same, vp in chge adv 

Devoe Sc Raynolds Co Inc. N. Y.. adv mgr 

Same, vp 

Same, gen sis mgr 

Same, adv mgr 

Nestle Co. N. \ .. ad\ mgr 

Same, sis. aelv mgr 




National Broadcast Sales Executives (Personnel changes 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Vmos li.ii'ui 

William II. I nsign 

John ski [ammann 

< < . 1 1 ii i.i ii Johnston 

Frank G. king 

w Ullam s. Murdoi k 

l). .n Oakes 

I i ank I Pillegrin 

Iti in e Pirie 

Joj 1 1- Risen mlllei 

Fee \ mi Nost rand 



KSD.I, San Diego, sis mgr 

Rural Radio Network, Ithaca V v.. sis mgr 

ABC. N. v, ., an I eiec 

i in Radio Sales acct exec 

(lis H'wood.. Western <li\ nssi sis mgr 
\\<>l Wash., sis mgr. asst gen mgr 

< I \( ..Calgary. Alberta. Can., sis staff 
ks I I . , Si I . pres, vi» n mgr 

< k i< M . Begin a, Saskatchewan, Can., sis mgr 

W M I . < i ilar Rapids, Iowa, sis 



KECA, H'wooil.. sis mgr 

Transit Radio. N. Y., head, sis mgr 

W Mil). N. \ .. da\ time sis mgr 

k\l()\. St I .. n. ill sis mgr 

KTTV-TY, F. A., sis mgr 

WOIC- I \ . Wash., sis mgr 

ckrm, Reglna, Saskatchewan, Can., sis mgr 
Transit Radio. Chi., sis mgr 
CKRC. Winnipeg, Manlti ba, Can., sis mgr 
Intercollegiate Broadcasting System, V v .. sis mgr 

Same, sis mgr ^ > * l l_ 



l<l < I UBER. 1948 




^OH* CAM COVe * C*« 



<*. 



/ 



/ 



r 

x 



£ 




* 



%, 



\ 



\ 



1 



The Georgia Trio 







. \290K' 




Georgia's First 3 Markets 



THE TRIO OFFERS ADVERTISERS AT ONE LOW COST: 

Concentrated coverage • Merchandising assistance 
Listener loyalty built by local programming • Dealer loyalties 

— IN GEORGIA'S FIRST THREE MARKETS 



The Georgia Trio 



uimsz 



Represented, individually 



f 'y T ? 




and as a group, by 



THE KATZ AGENCY, INC. 

New York • Chicago • Detroit • Atlanta • Kansas City • San Francisco • Los Angeles • Dallas 






DECEMBER 1948 



81 




Yes — WHIZ floods Southeastern 
Ohio with an average evening share-of- 
audience of 64.6% (Conlan Survey 
week of May 23, 1948). 

Here's a new high-water mark of 
audience domination — a "plus value" 
for all WHIZ advertisers. 

Morning, afternoon and evening 
WHIZ averages 62.2% share-of-audi- 
ence . . . proof of the results of top 
local production and popular NBC 
programs. 

Buy the station with 
the BONUS audience. 




represented by 

John €. Pearson Co. 



WHY SPONSORS CHANGE 

(Continued from page 23) 

Columbia's Sunday sponsors and lined up 
an imposing schedule which started with 
Ozzie and Harriet at 6 p.m. sponsored by 
International Silver. The complete CBS 
schedule from October 1944 to June 1945 
ran like this: 



Program 
Ozzie and Harriet 

Fanny Brice 
Kate Smith 
"Blondie" 



Sponsor 
International 

Silver 
General Foods 
General Foods 
Colgate-Palm- 

olive-Peet 
Parker Pen 
Campbell Soup 
Texaco 
Eversharp 
Gulf 



News 

"Reader's Digest'' 
"Star Theatei 
"Take It or Leave It" 
"We the People" 

The CBS Sunday program block just 
didn't make the top grade. The results of 
an all-out plan to build a new habit of 
istening is fine — if it comes off. When it 
doesn't, sponsors shift to new networks 
and often new programs. Of CBS's im- 
posing line-up of '44-'45, International 
Silver has moved Ozzie and Harriet to 
NBC. General Foods dropped Fanny 
Brice and Kate Smith. Blondie has be- 
come part of the Gilder sleeve-Duffy's 
Tavern Wednesday block on NBC. The 
five-minute news block on CBS has been 
dropped and Parker Pen is off the air due 



to the condition of the pen business. 
Texaco has taken its Star Theater to 
ABC, with its TV Star Theater to NBC. 
Take It or Leave It has been shifted to 
NBC. It shifted because there was the 
feeling that Eversharp had milked CBS's 
Sunday night audience and that NBC 
might deliver a partially different audi- 
ence at the same time. The fact that 10 
p.m. Sundays opened up on NBC was of 
course another reason for the shift. 

Gulf Oil is still sponsoring We the 
People on CBS but at 9 p.m. Tuesdays 
which competitively used to be a good 
time slot. Today battling Bob Hope who 
has been shifted from 10 p.m. to 9 p.m. on 
NBC there's a question in the minds of 
many Gulf executives just how good a 
slot 9 p.m. Tuesday is. 

•This year CBS is again building a Sun- 
day night block but with a new approach. 
It's shifting programs with known follow- 
ings to the block with the first shift being 
Amos 'n' Andy now in at 7:30 p m. This 
move was brought about because of a 
capital gains plan which CBS offered 
Charles Correll (Amos) and Freeman 
Gosden (Andy) which insured their 
futures. In other words CBS now owns 
the program and that's one certain way to 
persuade a sponsor to change networks. 
Lever Brothers now sponsors Amos 'n' 



Season's Greetings 



WAPO 



CHATTANOOGA 



Affiliated with 

NBC 



National Representatives 

HEADLEY-REED CO. 



82 



SPONSOR 



Andy on CBS. 

Capital gains structures are being sug- 
gested to a number of other leading stars 
by CBS and there is more than a chance 
that many star-owned programs will 
move, with their sponsors, to CBS. 

The trend of sponsors starting on 
Mutual and moving from MBS to other 
networks after the Edgar Kobak-headed 
chain has done a job for the advertisers is 
becoming less and less pronounced. 

There is still, however, a general feeling 
among network salesmen that every spon- 
sor on the air is a possibility for their 
networks. 

This March, NBC decided that Quick 
as a Flash heard on MBS could fill an open 
spot (2:30 p.m.) on its Sunday dayt me 
schedule. The program had been heard 
late Sunday afternoons (5:30 p.m.) for 
four years on Mutual. It would cost 
more to broadcast it on the senior net- 
work but according to NBC's presenta- 
tion it would deliver 2,562 listeners per 
dollar against 904 delivered by MBS. Of 
course the listener figures were based upon 
a combination of Hooperatings and BMB, 
neither of which Mutual claims covers its 
current listening picture adequately. The 
NBC presentation covered the fact that it 
would deliver a "new" audience, not one 



that had been dialing Quick as a Flash for 
four years. Flash is heard right after The 
Shadow which is MBS's one period when 
it dominates the network listening picture. 
Due to the fact that Helbros, the sponsor, 
wasn't convinced that 2:30 p.m. was as 
good as 5:30 p.m. and the fact that the 
NBC period would cost $8,917.24 for the 
half hour, which was considerably above 
what he was paying MBS, the watch 
manufacturer stayed just where it was. 

Availability of a "new" audience is 
always a potent reason for a network 
shift. It's a lure that doesn't always 
work out. Any recap of shifting sponsors 
indicates that the more itching the feet 
the more likely the exit of the advertiser 
from the medium. Out of a list of 50 
sponsors that shifted networks since 1944, 
19 are no longer using broadcast adver- 
tising. The more frequent the shift the 
more apt the advertiser to shift — off the 
network air. Among the shift from net- 
work-to-network-to-off the networks and 
frequently off the air entirely are: 

J. B. Williams Co. 
Owens-Illinois Glass Co. 
Allegheny-Ltidliim Steel Corp. 
Maryland Pharmaceutical Co. 
Textron, Inc. 
Chef-Boy-Ar-Dee. Inc. 
Chas. E. Hires Co. 
Time, Inc. 
Household Finance 



W"n - 




TO REACH ATLANTA 
HOUSEWIVES 

The Maggie Davis show 2:00 to 2:30 
Monday through Friday features our Mag- 
gie with les Henrickson as relief. The gal 
features local and national news with the 
woman's slant, has a wide knowledge of 
home economics, meal planning, nutrition, 
child care; also, fashions "with the light 
touch." tes handles roving mike interviews 
with studio audience, supplies the male 
angle on food, fashions, general topics. 

This is the only established woman's par- 
ticipation program available in Atlanta for 
national advertisers. 

Maggie is now keeping company with 
such famous names as: Celanese Corpo- 
ration, Chase & Sanborn, 
Canada Dry, Fleischmann'j 
Yeast, Welch's Grape Juice, 
Modern Ice, Yodora, Ladies 
Home Journal and others. 




For further information 
call Headley-Reed Company 
todav. 



ABC 



IN ATLANTA IT'S 

WCON 

THE ATLANTA CONSTITUTION 

STATION 
5000 WATTS 5 50 K.C 



DECEMBER" 1948 



83 



4 LMG-WORTH 

MIKE 
MYSTERY" 





4l%ki$k 




Charles Moore, clad only in pajamas, sat 
on the edge of his bed, his head bowed 
in grief. In a choked voice, he told 
Homicide Lieutenant Evans his story. 
Through the open connecting door lead- 
ing to his wife's room, the strangled 
body of Myra Moore was visible among 
the tangled blankets on her bed. 

"J awoke from a sound sleep," Moore 
said, "and heard my wife Myra scream- 
ing. 1 didn't hesitate even long enough 
to turn on a light. With Myra's screams 
still ringing in my ears, I rushed into 
the living room, just in time to inter- 
cept a man as he came dashing out of 
her room. 1 tackled him in the darkness, 
but he knocked me out and escaped." 

Lieutenant Evans shook his head. "Mr. 
Moore," he said, "you're lying. Two 
points in what you've just told me prove 
as much. I'm arresting you on suspicion 
of murder." 

(Solution below) 

"Mike Mystery" is a feature of a 15-minute 
transcribed music and mystery show avail- 
able 5 times weekly for national, regional 
or local sponsorship on 600 Lang-Worth 
affiliated stations. For full information, 
contact your station or its representative. 

LMG-WORTH 

feature programs, inc. 

113 W 57TH ST. NEW YORK 19, N. Y. 



THE SOLUTION 

apis /.ii| 0| X||33J|P 
8uio8 |0 peaisuj 'wool 8ujai| ai|i ojui paqsnj uiooj 
-paq j»i| uiojj Huiujoo suieajis s.afi* siq Aq pasnoje 
uaaq Simeq ja||e pueqsnq aqi )a A uado apiM sbm 
suioojpaq om| aqi uaaMjaq loop Suipauuoo aqi osiv 

Suiweans ajiM siq pjeaq ajoo|Aj iai|e |no paum aq 
o| uo<|e|n8uej|s Aq japjniu joj auj;i q8noua |OU se* 
ajaq) adeasa o) 8uj)duia|ie se* oqM ia||i>| pasoddns 
aqi idaojaiui pue uiooj Suiaii aq) o)ui uni o| unq joj 
pajinbaj spuosas ma) Ajba aq) u| a>(OMs aq uaqM Suj 

wean- ||||s seM aji« siq 'Ajo|S saioow 0) Huipioisy 



EH33EH] 



"Mike Myiterlei" are protected by 
copyrlfht Anyone makint use ol this 
n any manner without permission ol Lanj Worth 
able to prosecution 



luture 

Future Propanu, Inc., It 



Union Pacific Railroad 
Lockheed Aircraft Corp. 
Welch Grape Juice Co. 
Joseph Tetly & Co., Inc. 
C. B. Mueller Co. 
Prince Matchabelli, Inc. 

Some of the sponsors have shifted to 
selective radio, others to TV but the big 
majority have just shifted off the air. In 
most cases they didn't know what they 
wanted from broadcasting and in addition 
didn't know how to go about finding out. 

Firms like Prince Matchabelli, used 
NBC, CBS, and ABC before exiting from 
broadcast advertising. Others used just 
two chains before calling it quits. 

Not every firm that plays the field 
finally exits from broadcast advertising. 
Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company for 
instance during the past four years has 
been on all four networks before settling 
down to its current The Greatest Story 
Ever Told on ABC. It was off the air for 
a number of years before it was sold on 
the idea of reaching the great "Bible belt" 
of America through this non-sectarian 
series based upon the Bible. 

Programs frequently cause sponsor 
network shifts. CBS didn't feel that 
Those Brewsters was a good program for 
Columbia, and Quaker Oats, happy with 
the vehicle, took it to Mutual. When 
Quaker Oats finally decided to drop Those 
Brewsters and shift to Roy Rogers it 
stayed on at MBS. The Sheriff wasn't 
judged up to snuff by CBS and so the 
Pacific Coast Borax Company took it to 
ABC. These shifts were made because 
the sponsor thought that his program was 
reaching the type of audience it desired 
and couldn't be sold by the network that 
it was on that the program wasn't right. 

Sponsors are also shifted because of 
star preference for a specific network. 
When Ed Gardner first brought Duffy's 
Tavern to the air (March 1941) it was on 
CBS for Magazine Repeating Razor 
Company (Schick razors) on Saturday 
nights 8:30-8:55 p.m., not a very good 
hour. Gardner plumped for a better time 
and the following season won Thursday 
8:30-8:55 p.m. with the same sponsor. 
The next season he shifted to the sponsor- 
ship of General Foods and Tuesday from 
9 to 9:30 p.m. From General Foods he 
went to Bristol-Meyer, his present spon- 
sor, and ABC on Tuesdays at 8:30-8:55. 
He stayed at that hour for two seasons 
but he always had his eyes on the net- 
work on which he claimed "comedians 
attained the best ratings" NBC. Finally 
in September 1944 he landed a Friday 
night 8:30 p.m. spot on that chain. Fri- 
day, before this season, hasn't been too 
good a spot on NBC and so Gardner kept 
looking for a better comedy night and 
now is heard in a humor block on Wednes- 



KMLB 

KEY TO RICH 
NORTHEASTERN 
LOUISIANA 
MARKET 



• MONROE 
LOUISIANA 



4P ■ 




FACTS- 

*KMLB serves a 223 million 
dollar market encompassing 
97,410 radio homes — all with- 
in KMLB's one milevolt con- 
tour. In area this includes 
17 parishes in northeastern 
Louisiana and 3 counties in 
Arkansas. 



*BMB report. 



5,000 WATTS DAY 
1,000 WATTS NIGHT 



AFFILIATED WITH 

American Broadcasting Company 



Represented by 

Taylor-Borroff & Company, Inc. 



84 



SPONSOR 



Baltimore 
Television 

means 
WMAR-TV 



As MARYLAND'S 
pioneer television station, 
WMAR-TV consistently cov- 
ers an area from Washington 
to Wilmington. (Del.), and 
from Pennsylvania to the 
Potomac. 

The peerless propagation of 
Channel Two carries programs 
from TWO major networks, 
via the television station of the 
Sunpapers of Baltimore to 
televiewers in the Chesapeake 
basin area. WMAR-TV's own 
coverage of political cam- 
paigns, sports and special 
events— civic, patriotic, and 
cultural— is unequaled in this 
rich, productive area. 

Represented by 

THE KATZ AGENCY 

INCORPORATED 

ATLANTA ■ CHICAGO ■ DALLAS 

DETROIT ■ KANSAS CITY ■ LOS ANGELES 

NEW YORK ■ SAN FRANCISCO 



day (9-9:30 p.m.). His sponsor went 
along with him, for lie has delivered on a 
low cost-per-point basis from the begin- 
ning. Gardner isn't unique and there are 
other stars who consider the proper spot 
on the right network as important to 
them as the pay check. 

The Ford Theater shifted from NBC 
(Sunday 5-6 p.m.) to CBS for two rea- 
sons. First a good 60 minutes wasn't 
available for Ford on NBC. It was hoped 
that the NBC Sunday afternoon spot 
would deliver the audience but Ford was 
bucking a habit of listening which gave 
Mutual the edge during that period and 
Sunday afternoon isn't the ideal time for 
an hour-long drama. Besides, CBS con- 
sistently has delivered a better audience 
for plays than NBC having established 
itself with "good theater" almost from its 
founding when Arabesque brought top- 
flight audiences to the then infant web. 

The most successful sponsors make the 
fewest network changes. There are ex- 
ceptions to this rule as witness the con- 
densed milk company and others men- 
tioned previously in this radio chess game 
saga. Big sponsors nevertheless will shift 
programs from network to network after 
they feel their vehicles have sold all the 
listeners available at one hour of the day 
over one network. (A report on Why 
Sponsors Change Programs is a future 
study which will appear in these pages 
shortly.) 

One reason why big sponsors don't shift 
can be traced to a matter of discounts 
(dollar volume, contiguous programs, and 
frequency) . To move a program from one 
network to another in a number of cases 
would double the cost of the program for 
the sponsor. [This is because of the fact 
that a move could place a sponsor in a 
different discount bracket and break up a 
block of contiguous programs. There is 
also the factor of sacrificing the habit of 
listening which programs develop. 

Sponsors change networks for many 
reasons but an analysis of over 100 
changes proves that the successful changes 
are those to a better time slot in a block 
program sequence. Even these have been 
known to be unsuccessful unless sponsor, 
agency and new network work to promote 
and publicize the change. 

Sponsor shifts on networks are a big 
business — for other media. When Ameri- 
can Tobacco Company shifted to Jack 
Benny and NBC they agreed to spend 
$250,000 a year publicizing the fact. Re- 
cently a network offered a sponsor on 
another network a $225,000 newspaper 
advertising campaign if he shifted a 
program. 

All shifts must be made in high. * * * 



The 
music 
pours forth 

in 
Spillville 



(IOWA) 




A northeastern Iowa village of 
500 people, Spillville is widely 
known as the summer home of 
the famous composer, Antonin 
Dvorak. In this fertile farming 
area he found inspiration for 
many beautiful melodies. 

WMT also makes sweet music in 
Spillville — and in a thousand 
similar communities in WMT- 
land. With Iowa's stupendous 
bumper crop, Iowa farm income 
will reach new peaks this year. 
And WMT's listeners will have 
more money than ever to spend 
with WMT advertisers. Ask the 
Katz man for full details. 






-**WrSC. 



CtCvAXN^v^CSfO&.S^. • 






WMT 

CEDAR RAPIDS 

5000 Watts 600 K.C. Day & Night 
BASIC COLUMBIA NETWORK 









DECEMBER 1948 



8S 



SPONSOR 
SPEAKS 



TV Danger Ahead 

Television, which may yet turn out to 
be a model of self-regulated good taste, is 
currently in need of taking stock of itself. 

The signs point to danger. There's 
growing awareness, by sponsors, broad- 
casters, and viewers, of a risque quality to 
many telecasts. The big-time night club 
favorites aren't above slipping in a fast 
one or two via the new medium. If they 
aren't challenged, objectionable refer- 
ences, gestures, and gags are bound to 
iiu rease. 

The problem isn't confined to the stars. 
One irate TV station manager reported 
that he finds it necessary to check re- 
hearsals of his one-night-stand enter- 
tainers (frequently engaged via booking 
agents) with an eagle eye and flapping ear. 



Television, with its many virtues, lends 
itself readily to much that is unpalatable 
in the home. A broadcaster recently 
stated that the dance routine required of 
a four-year-old offended him and his 
family. 

The line of demarcation separating de- 
sirable and undesirable is very faint. 
Without a TV code of ethics, there's grave 
danger that some time within the next 
year or two the public will demand regu- 
latory action. 

We prefaced all this by saying that TV 
"may yet turn out to be a model of self- 
regulated good taste." There's no reason 
to think otherwise. For television falls 
heir to the fruits of years of study involved 
in two effective and pertinent codes — the 
Motion Picture Producers and the Broad- 
casters. 

It's up to TBA or NAB, or both, to get 
busy. 

Live Programing 

The time has passed when it matters by 
what electronic method a program is 
brought into the home. The success of 
the Bing Crosby program over ABC is of 
course a classic example of the fact that 
transcribed programs can reach a better 
than normal network audience. Both 
ABC and MBS have a number of pro- 
grams which are transcribed or wire re- 
corded before being transmitted and there 
is no difference between reactions to enter- 
tainment on platters than there is to that 
sent forth live on the chains. 

From the very outset, TV has elimin- 



ated an>' antipathy to film, television's 
equivalent to recorded programing. Early 
ratings indicated that film ranked high 
among viewing habits, despite the Grade 
B and C film features which were scanned. 
Film today is an important part of TV 
programing. It therefore makes very 
little sense to refuse to accept recorded 
programs for one broadcast medium and 
to accept them for another. 

CBS has broken its unwritten rule for 
the daytime commercial program, What 
Makes You Tick and WCBS, its New 
York outlet, has accepted (see Mr. Spon- 
sor Asks) the new transcribed Bing 
Crosby program. Plans for CBS summer 
programing call for many e.t. programs. 

NBC's new summer ideas also call fo r 
transcribed repeats of top winter pro- 
grams, so that even the senior network is 
recognizing that if the program is tops, 
recording won't tear it down. 

However, the use of transcriptions must 
never be permitted to become so preva- 
lent that they completely eliminate live 
programing. Broadcasting's immediacy 
must not be replaced with 100 r ( ' plattered 
shows. Sponsors must continue to be 
made aware that live programing, both 
local and network; is the lifeblood of 
broadcast advertising. Station and net- 
work program managers must not be 
made, as they are in the motion picture 
industry, the glorified janitors of enter- 
tainment. 

The feeling of the listener that "I am 
there" mustn't be eliminated from the 
advertising medium that reaches the 
nation. 



Applause 



Pilot and WABD Help TV 

Two major contributions to speeding 
the growth of TV as an advertising 
medium were made during the past few 
months. They were in no way connected, 
yet they both contributed to increasing 
television's audience. 

The lust contribution was the WABD 
(N. Y.) scheduling of programs for a full 
daj from earl) a.m. to after 10 p.m. It 
seemed at first blush to be a risky gesture 
foi the DuMont station to staj on the air 
throughout the day, and one that would 
cost 1 1 1. pioneer New York telecaster sub- 
stantial sums of money. It didn't turn 
out that way. The operation, before the 
end ol the first month, was in the black. 

It also seemed that it would take a 



comparatively long time to get the TV 
audience to learn that there was a station 
on the air from sunup to sundown plus. 
This also proved incorrect. Viewers were 
very quick to learn that there was some- 
thing to see and hear on the daytime air 
and they have been tuning to WABD in 
substantial numbers. Just as DuMont 
speeded up the return of TV to the air 
during the war, just so is it forcing sta- 
tions throughout the nation to recognize 
that daytime TV is here now. True, the 
level of WABD's programing isn't woi Id 
shattering. In many instances it's con- 
siderably short of passable visual enter- 
tainment. That's not half as important 
as the fact that the break has been made 
and regular daytime TV has arrived. 

The second major contribution is Pilot 
Radio's. Pilot has produced a TV re- 
ceiver selling at $99. SO that's easy to tune, 



requires a minimum of installation and 
with an assist of a magnifying lens delivers 
a picture large enough to be enjoyed by 
many people. The Pilot $99.50 television 
set is light enough to be picked up in the 
ami and carried around the house. It's as 
simple to tune as the average radio re- 
ceiver. Both the sound and the picture 
are clear. It has broken through the $400 
price range for TV sets that has held back 
mass buying of receivers. It's not a sub- 
stitute for a large screen set, but it must 
always be remembered that millions of 
homes listen to radio on portable sets and 
have no other receivers in the home. It 
takes a $99.50 midget TV set to convert 
this audience to the visual medium. Pilot 
has delivered the set. 

To WABD and Pilot, the sponsors of 
the nation owe a deep bow for hastening 
the arrival of national-TV day. 



86 



SPONSOR 



Where else in America? 





- >j< Not the north — not the 
south! Not the busy indus- 
trial east nor the farm-rich 
middle west can really mir- 
ror our land in all its varied 
aspects. But there is one area, embracing 
parts of all these places, which does. It's 
WLW-Land — a true cross section of the 
country. 

Where else in America could you 
hope to find so perfect a proving ground 
for new products and new ideas? 

In WLW's Merchandise-Able Area 
are 330 counties comprising parts of 
seven states. Nearly 14 million people 
live here. Some are wealthy, some are 
poor. Some live in great cities, some in 
liny villages. Some work in factories, 
some own farms. When you know how 
these people will react to your product, 
your package, your selling appeal — 
you'll have a good idea how consumers 
everywhere will respond. 

And you CAN know through WLW ; 
for this great radio station covers the 
area as a network covers the nation. It 
dominates most cities but not every city. 
It reaches most farms but not every farm. 
You'll face this same condition else- 



where throughout the country, no mat- 
ter what medium or combination of 
media you choose. But by using WLW 
first, you can learn the answers in 
advance. 

WLW is particularly well equipped 
to help you get the answers. Besides one 
of the nation's largest and most loyal 
listening audiences, WLW offers facili- 
ties not equalled by any other station. 
It can help you siudy the market — get 
distribution — win dealer cooperation. It 
can help you learn what consumers 
really think about your product — your 
price — your package. With manpower 
to do the job, and a "know-how" pe- 
culiar to its territory, The Nation's Sta- 
tion stands ready to serve you in the 
proving ground for America! 



WLW 



THE NATIONS MOST MERCHANDISE-ABLE STATION 










pOnTANT 



III 



WESTERN 
UNION 



1207 



JOSEPH L. EGAN 

PRESIDENT 





SS^bSm <*»»»• •*-■ " "* *~ °° 



to* teW. »«'* '" *•* "^ * 



ADVERTISERS, UNLIMITED. 

ANYWHERE .USA. _ ^ ^ BR0AD 

SS55.-5S 

T1SERS FOR SPOT OR PROGRAM TIME - STOP - FOR OETA.IS - WRITE WJW 
CLEVELAND FIFTEEN, 0,0. WJW _ CL EVELANDS CH.EF STAT.ON 




Bill O NEIL. President 



BASIC 

ABC Network 




CLEVELAND 



850 KC 

5000 Watts 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY HEADLEY-REED COM 



P A N Y 



O J> 



Glass Wax: miracle in 1948— p. 30 

Wholesalers' lament— p. 26 

Cereals and how they're sold— p. 21 

TV law: confusion plus— p. 34 







°*°k 




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Will our rockets have reached the moon? 

Will the uses of atomic energy 
be a boon to mankind? 

And what about broadcasting? Will radio be 
a satellite of television? Perhaps a new miracle 
of air transmission will be exciting the world. 

In 1960, as today, you can bank on this: 
Havens and Martin Stations will be experimenting, 
pioneering, and programming for 
the listeners of Virginia. 

Half the joy of broadcasting is vision. 
Much of the rest is serving. 

Watch the First Stations of Virginia in 1949 . . . 
WMBG-AM, WCOD-FM, WTVR, The South's first 
television station, affiliates of N B C. 







WMBG am 
WTVR tv 
WCOD- 



. ?&*/ ://„//,■„.> ,/ ty/jy/vu, 



Havens and Martin Stations, Richmond 20, Va. 
John Blair & Company, National Representatives 
Affiliates of National Broadcasting Company 



vfl 



TS.. .SPONSOR REPORTS. . 




..SPONSOR REPORT 



SKOURAS AND ABC 
STILL TALKING 
STOCK PURCHASE 



3 January 1949 

Twentieth-Century Fox and ABC are still talking business. There is 
every indication that Skouras motion picture operation will directly 
or indirectly move in on American network. When and if it does, 
expect some ABC capital gains gestures which will bring top Hooper 
names to ABC. 



END OF DISK BAN 
SAVES RECORD 
SPINNING SHOWS 



TV TALENT UNIONS 
CONTINUE EVERY 
MAN FOR HIMSELF 



-SR- 

End of recording ban came just in time to save radio lives of 
number of disk jockeys who were finding that few of them are good 
enough to hold audiences with chatter and old disks. 

-SR- 

Talent union situation in TV is as cloudy as it was day 4-As (over- 
all talent union) set up investigating committee. Radio actors 
group felt it had everything under control, but one after another of 
unions have kicked over applecart. No talent group is willing to 
give up TV jurisdiction. 

-SR- 

Income from station representation is important to networks. 
They'll not give up this part of their business without fight. 
Independent association of station representatives made good case 
against chains before FCC, but battle has only begun. 

-SR- 

By 15 June, CBS expects to be most powerful network in broadcasting 
history. It will be roughly 40,000 watts more powerful than NBC 
at night and have 58,000 watts more oomph in daytime. These figures 
do not take into count wavelengths (position on dial) and other 
factors not measured by FCC authorized power. 

-SR- 

MARKET RESEARCHER Indicative of what some firms feel about market research is election 



WEBS WANT THEIR 
REP BUSINESS 
TO CONTINUE 



CBS PASSES NBC 
IN POWER NEXT 
JUNE? 



HEADS McCANN- 
ERICKS0N 



of Marion Harper, Jr. , to presidency of McCann-Erickson during 
•second week of December. Harper is second president of agency which 
has been headed by H. K. McCann since its founding in 1930. Many of 
McC-E accounts have clauses in contracts calling for special research 
services. Agency has been figure and fact minded since inception. 

-SR- 

INSTALLATION Problem of high annual consumer service charges for TV sets is hold- 
AND SERVICE COSTS ing back many purchases, retailers report in confidential survey 
HOLDING BACK TV conducted by lesser TV manufacturer. "When installation and service 

charges are more than cost of an adequate AM radio-phonograph com- 
bination, they stop buyers dead," is way big radio-TV dealer 
phrased it. 

SPONSOR, VoL3. No. 3. 3 January I9',9. Published biweekly by Sponsor Publicatio.ru Inc. Publication offices: 5800 V. Marcine St.. Philadelphia if. Pa. Adrertisiruj. Editor- 
ial, and Circulation offices. i0 W. 52 St., New York 19. N. Y. Acceptance under the act of June 5. I93'i at Philadelphia. Pennsylvania, authorized December 2. 19'i7 



3 JANUARY 1949 



REPORTS. . .SPONSOR RE PORTS. .. SPONSOR H 



COLUMBIA (S.A.) Indication of what record companies and Petrillo (AFM) seek in U. S. 
TAXES DISK-PLAY- as levy against broadcasting stations playing home recordings, is 
ING BY STATIONS Columbia (S. A.) tax on playing of records by broadcasters. Every 

time station plays disk, it pays 3 centavos to government which in 
turn pays royalties to recording companies and composers. 

-SR- 

December saw 1,000,000th post-war TV receiver come off production 
line of members of Radio Manufacturers Association. RMA represents 
great majority of all radio and television set manufacturers. 

-SR- 

Need of aggressive advertising by package-goods manufacturers is 
indicated by consistent decrease of counter (service) grocers. In 
1939, 45% of independent grocery and combination stores had sales- 
men. In 1949, it's estimated that only 10% are not self-service or 
semi-self-service. Products in self-service stores must be ad sold. 

-SR- 

AIR ADVERTISING Broadcast advertising will not decrease in 1949, according to esti- 
INCREASE EXPECTED mates of industry statisticians. Virtual exodus of Standard Brands 
IN YEAR 1949 and a few other network advertisers will be balanced by greatly in- 
creased automotive, drug, and insurance advertising. It's also ex- 
pected that SB will be back on air before end of year when a new 
approach to using air time comes forth from new agency for account. 
Increase in broadcast advertising does not include TV expenditures. 



TV SET PRO- 
DUCTION PASSES 
MILLION MARK 



GROWTH OF SELF- 
SERVICE FORCES 
PACKAGE GOODS 
ADVERTISING 



BENNY IS GOOD 
IN THIS T0WN- 
AUTRY'S BETTER 



RATING BATTLE 
CONTINUES HOT 



CONTINENTAL MAY 
BE FIFTH NETWORK 



-SR- 

How local listening habits differ is indicated in town below Mason 
Dixon line. CBS station in area wasn't particularly happy it was 
getting Jack Benny after 2 January. Gene Autry competing with Benny 
over this station regularly topped J. B. by 4 to 5 Hooper points. 

-SR- 

Battle between NRI (Nielsen) and Hooperatings continues hot and 
heavy. NBC has signed U. S. Hooperatings and both services have 
signed number of important agencies and clients. Hooper has in- 
creased diary sample and Nielsen is installing new Audimeters. With 
listening habits changing this year due to switch in network pro- 
graming, it is more important than ever for industry* to have rating 
service on which advertiser, agency, and broadcaster^ agree . CBS is 
said to have signed to pay S3, 000 per point it doesn't gather with 
Benny, based upon previous Benny ratings. If Hooper and Nielsen 
ratings don't agree (and they probably won't) it's hoped that con- 
tract is very specific on what CBS pays off. (Benny has for years 
lived and suffered with his Hooperatings.) 

-SR- 

Continental FM-Network is moving more and more in direction of being 
network first and FM (except as interconnection facilities) second. 
It's also following TV network policy of using transcriptions (in 
this case tape recordings) to service non-connected affiliates. Thus 
far AT&T hasn't decided to fight Continental as being "unfair to 
telephone lines." 



SPONSOR 



Babson's "Magic Circle" Prove* Our Claim... 




KCMO's Mid-America is TVfale of Market! 

KCMO's Mid-America, located completely within the "Magic Circle," 
has always been a big market — and it's getting bigger and bigger! 
For radio coverage in the "Magic Circle," you need KCMO's one- 
station blanketing of Mid-America. 213 counties inside KCMO's 
50,000 watt measured '/2 millivolt area — listened to in 466 
counties in 6 "Magic Circle" stotes (gray counties on map). Center 
your selling on KCMO, Kansas City's most powerful station for 
Mid-America, in the "Magic Circle." 

KCMO 

. . . and KCFM 94.9 Megacycles 

KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI 

Basic ABC Station for Mid-America 

ONE station • ONE set of call letters 
ONE rate c a rd • O N E spot on the dial 



"Richest in time of peace, safest in time of war," says economist 
Roger Babson about the "Magic Circle" area! And, Walter Bowers, 
Secretary, "Mogic Circle" Development Conference, adds, "The 
annual income of the 'Magic Circle' has increased in ten years 
from six to sixteen billion dollars. Bank deposits have gone up in 
some parts of the 'Magic Circle' as much as five hundred per 
cent. Land values have doubled and tripled. The 'dust bowls' of 
the 20's and 30's have become the boom bowls' of the forties!" 



50,000 WATTS DAYTIME -Non-Directional 

10 # 000 WATTS NIGHT-af 8io (cc 



National Representatives 

JOHN E. PEARSON COMPANY 







OneVoesNriMid'Atnetiw 



3 JANUARY 1949 



#.. 



I mu 



l\ 



0& ^ 



SPONSOR REPORTS 

40 WEST 52ND 

ON THE HILL 

MR. SPONSOR: G. VERNON COWPER 

PS. 

NEW AND RENEW 

CEREALS AND HOW THEY'RE SOLD 

THE PETER PAUL FORMULA 

WHOLESALERS' LAMENT 

DOWN TO EARTH 

GLASS WAX: MIRACLE IN 1948 

RADOX RESEARCH 

TV LAW: CONFUSION PLUS 

SELECTIVE TRENDS 

TV RESULTS 

MR. SPONSOR ASKS 

CONTESTS AND OFFERS 

4-NETWORK COMPARAGRAPH 

APPLAUSE 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 




1 
4 
6 
12 
14 
17 
21 
24 
26 
28 
30 
32 
34 
36 
40 
44 
52 
59 
78 
78 



■ I bi-wcckl) bj sponsor publi. 

cations inc, Executive, Editorial, and Advertiaini 

Mew York 18, N. V. Telephone: Plaza 

Chicago Office: 360 N. Michigan ivenue Telephone: 

Offio ''- 1111 North Marrini 

Street, P II, Pa Subscriptions United States $8 a 

inada SO. Singli copii 60c Printed in U S A Copj 

righl 1949 SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC 

i Publisher: Norman K Glenn. Secretary- 

I mi. < 'ouper Glenn. I r: Joa ph M. Kochler 

, : es Sinclair, James 

tella Brauner. Art Directoi Howard Wcchaler. 

i J. Blumcntl mg Do- 

portment rial I (Chicago Manager] 

Dun an I r Co., 448 

Hill Sir' I Co., Mills BIdg. 

Cirrulation Manager: Milton B i 

COVER I'll i i mi admires his billing in hunts 

in front of ('I)S':. Hollywood Playhouse. 



40 West 52nd 



WRONG TOWN 

In looking over the December issue of 
sponsor, I was ten ifically shocked to note 
on page 28 you carried a picture of our 
homespun philosopher and listed WIBW 
as Wichita. 

Ben Ludy 
General Manager 
WIBW, Topeka 

f Reader Ludy is hereby thanked for halting 
SPONSOR'S attempt to relocate one of the mid- 
west's most popular outlets. 



SCHWERIN LOST NO CLIENTS 

We noted with surprise the statement 
in your December issue ("Sponsor Re- 
ports," page 2) that qualitative radio re- 
search organizations "signed no new con- 
tracts during November, and in several 
cases lost clients." 

Schwerin Research Corporation is doing 
far and away the biggest volume of such 
work, and the above statement, if true, 
would reflect on us. We don't know what 
the experience of others in the field has 
been, but in November we (a) signed a 
new contract with the National Broad- 
casting Company covering the year 1949 
and (b) signed contracts covering four 
major network programs and their com- 
mercials. As far as the second half of the 
statement goes, we have lost no clients, in 
November or in any other month. 

I trust you'll bring these correct facts to 
the attention of your readers. The num- 
ber of people I've had to straighten out on 
the facts of this situation is testimony of 
how much sponsor is read and believed 
throughout the industry. 

Horace S. Schwerin 

President 

Schwerin Research Corporation 

New York 



FARM YOUTH AND WTIC 

We were pleased to find the picture of 
our Farm Program Director, Frank At- 
wood, on page 44 of the November issue 
of sponsor. Your articles on farm 
broadcasting have been interesting and, I 
think, important. This is a field where 
radio can do an outstanding public 
service job and effective selling for com- 
mercial sponsors. 

Station WTIC has an early morning 
farm show, the WTIC Farmer's Digest, 
6: IS to 6:54, Monday through Sat rday, 
(Please turn to page 8) 



I LANG-WORTH 




M 



MYSTERY" 




/> ' 



Tlie (> of the 
$liiyeiln(| Corpse 

The woman lay crumpled in the snow 
in an alleyway between tall buildings. 
Although it was bitter cold, she wore 
no coat, and the only objects near her 
lifeless body were one of her shoes, the 
laces still neath tied, and her hat. which 
looked as fresh and new as though she 
had bought it only moments before. 

The young Irish policeman, who had 
discovered the body, scratched his head. 
"I'd say it"s a case of hit-and-run driv- 
ing." he said to Homicide 1 ieutenant 
Evans, "only there's no tire tracks. May- 
be some hoodlum blackjacked her and 
took off with her coat and purse. What 
do you think'" 

Lieutenant Evans said, "No, this is 
suicide Three clues prove that beyond 
a doubt." 

" \iu\ what may they be?" asked the 

cop. 

{Solution be/ow) 

"Mike Mystery" is a feature o(a 15-minute 
transcribed music and mystery show avail- 
able 5 times weekly for national, regional 
or local sponsorship on 600 Lang-Worth 
affiliated stations. For full information, 
contact your station or its representative. 

UK-WORTH 

feature programs, inc. 

113 W57TH ST. NEW YORK 19, N. Y. 



THE SOLUTION 

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K"|,l .1 '[ I I r^fl 'Mlka Mysteries'' are protected b» 
i f .1 ,1 i I I t L Mr n n r ii f M Anyone makini use ol this 
feature in any manner without permission ol Lan| Worth 
feature Projrams Inc is liable to prosecution 




Advertisers don't jump 
around from station-to-station 
...in Cleveland! They KNOW 
where they get sales results ... by 
reaching the largest audience 
at the lowest (network station) rates 




3 JANUARY 1949 




Broadcast Economy Better Than U. S.'s 

Broadcast advertising starts the new year with an economy 
that's better generally than the Nation as a whole. There's no 
expectation of a sizable radio recession during 1949 but the 
general business index will stand still or go back a little until 
April-May 1949. 

Luxury Items Suffered Most Christmas 1948 

Reports from the Hill indicate that luxury items suffered 
most in the 15%-or'Under Christmas buying of 1948. This 
indicates that most industries, except "necessities," will revise 
their ad budgets for this year. Even the so-called "low-cost" 
foods will have to resell the consumer on using them instead of 
higher-cost standard eatables. Public pressure, it is expected, 
will force government action which will enable farm foods to be 
sold under "support" levels. This will keep both the farmer 
and public happy. It's going to take some fancy federal book- 
keeping however. 

New Auto Lines in Fall 1949 

Automobile backlog is tapering off. New "used cars" no 
longer are bringing sizable premiums and older cars are settling 
down to "blue book" prices instead of the fancy premiums 
which they brought in 1947-48. New lines will be out this fall 
and with the new lines will come intensive broadcast advertis- 
ing and general advertising campaigns. There was compara- 
tively little competitive advertising in 1948 but there'll be 
plenty in 1949 with no holds barred. Kaiser-Frazer will be 
accepted as competition by rest of industry with K-F announc- 
ing a new car in the low price range which will force Ford to 
forget its quality appeal to fight for the low price market. 
General Motors will also get into the fight somewhere and will 
use considerable airtime and advertising space to tell its 
Chevrolet story. 

Better On the Hill Radio Coverage 

Washington's network reporters will be given some help 
during 1949. In the past, these voicers of what is happening 
on the Hill have been forced to rely on unofficial legmen who 
were actually publicity men with something to sell. In return 
for a possihk plug for their favorite client, seldom actually re- 
quested, they acted as the eyes and ears for network commen- 



tators. Now chains are considering budgets which will give 
their D. C. editors money for researchers. It's long overdue- 

"Freedom of the Air" Appeal Is Liked 

While Justin Miller, president of the National Association of 
Broadcasters, hasn't handled everything to the satisfaction of 
the members of the association which he represents, he has 
handled the "freedom of the air" issue so well that many of 
them are willing to forget his "messing up" the industry code 
operation. The code is supposed to be practically 100 c ( opera- 
tive starting January of this year, but it's already admitted 
that it will be more breached than obeyed. Judge Miller's 
problem is when to be tough with his own members and when 
to forego the whip. "Freedom" has carried him over the 
rough spots. 

A New Twist to Increased Postal Rates 

Increase in postage rates, which will come up again in the new 
Congress, will have a varied backing. One off-the-record plea 
for the new rates will be that they may actually permit an 
eventual return to lower rates through efficient advertising on 
the air and in the press. One of the assistant postmasters 
points to the accomplishments of Canada which has saved 
hundreds of thousands by practically eliminating the Holiday 
peak through advertising. The pre-Christmas Canada mail 
peak is around December 18 with the bulk of the mail delivered 
before December 24. It's a new twist— this "increase the rates 
so that we can reduce them later," but it may work. 



Anti-Antitrust Advertising? 

Expect increased public-informational advertising by milk, 
dairy products, baking industries and food chains. These and 
many other industrial groups will be among those hit by the 
40 antitrust cases reported on the agenda of the Department of 
Justice antitrust division. Since the department may ask for 
higher penalties, including six-month jail sentences and $50,000 
fines, managements in the threatened industries are planning 
counter measures in the form of good-will advertising. Build- 
ing materials, textiles, telephone equipment, radio and tele- 
vision receivers are all under Department of Justice eyes at 
present. Fact that most TV sets of equal ability are priced 
within a dollar of each other hasn't helped the radio industry. 

Undistributed Profit to Be Hit 

Labor will start using the air this Spring to point the finger at 
the fact that only 35% of corporate profits were distributed in 
1948. Some corporations can explain the reason for this but 
others are just playing it safe, at the expense of stockholders 
and labor, say labor economists. Extra tax on undistributed 
profits may result from labor's campaign. 

RCA Chairman Sarnoff Expected to Work on NBC 

NBC's losing a few key accounts and programs will force that 
network eventually to accept an overhauling with RCA's chair- 
man of the board, David Sarnoff in charge. With Frank 
Folsom (SPONSOR Reports, November 1948) in command of 
RCA's manufacturing activities, Sarnoff will devote a solid 
percentage of his time to NBC. The result will be healthy for 
all broadcast advertising. 

SPONSOR 



III in'xi issue: "Outlook" a now SI*0>SOII font lire 



MORE THAN HALF THE NATION'S STEEL 
IS PRODUCED IN THIS WWVA AREA 




A FOUR-STATE AREA RICH IN OPPORTUNITY 



Hard steel and soft coal combine to make this 
WWVA-land a solid market for alert adver- 
tisers. It's a land rich in people — more than 
eight million of them; it's rich in retail sales 
— nearly $4^2 Billion Dollars Annually; it's 
rich in potential — every day more industries 
are surveying the area to locate nearer their 
supply sources. 



This four-state area that makes WWVA-land 
includes Eastern Ohio, Western Pennsylvania, 
West Virginia and Virginia. From it come 
more than half the nation's steel, more than 
half the nation's bituminous coal. You can 
reach it with one station, one cost, one 
billing— with WWVA. An Edward Petry Man 
can tell you more about this land of opportunity. 




wwm 

50,000 WATTS--CBS--WHEELING, W. VA. 
NATIONALLY REPRESENTED BY EDWARD PETRY & CO. 

National Sales Headquarters: 527 Lexington Ave., New York City 






3 JANUARY 1949 






YOU MIGHT GET A 425- 
POUND WHITETAIL 
DEER - 

BUT... 

YOU NEED 

WKZO-WJEF 

TO MAKE 

A KILLING 

IN WESTERN MICHIGAN ! 

If you're shooting for higher sales in Western Michigan 
via radio, you've got to use nearby or home stations to tell 
your story effectively! 

Here's the reason: Insofar as radio reception is con- 
cerned, Western Michigan is unique. We have a definite 
and distinct "wall of fading" around our area that almost 
completely prevents good reception of outside stations, no 
matter what their power. Consequently, people in Western 
Michigan keep their radios tuned almost exclusively to 
near-by outlets; seldom even try for faraway stations! 

Of all the stations in Western Michigan. WKZO, Kala- 
mazoo, and WJEF, Grand Kapids do the most economical 
and effective job. Economical, because these two stations 
have an exceptionally attractive combination rate. . . . 
Effective because the January-February Hooper shows that, 
for Total Rated Time Periods, WKZO has an amazing 
55.8% Share of Audience and WJEF a solid 2.'{.1', in their 
respective cities! 

Lei us or Avery-Knodel. Inc. jji\c you all the facte you 
need about Western Michigan. NOW? 




* Albert Tippett fioi one that size, near Irani Lake, Michigan. 



WJEF 

J fat in KALAMAZOO jfodt in GRAND RAPIDS 



■nd GREATER WESTERN MICHIGAN 

(CIS) 



AND KENT COUNTY 

(CIS) 



BOTH OWNED AND OPERATED BY 
FET2ER BROADCASTING COMPANY 

Avery-Knodel, Inc., Exclusive National Representatives 



tO West 52nd 



(Continued from page 4) 

that has at least two newsworthy angles. 
It is one of the few service-type farm 
programs that has full commercial spon- 
sorship. As a part of our farm service, we 
have launched the $20,000 WTIC Farm 
Youth Program to help boys and girls 
acquire purebred breeding stock. 

The Clark Farm Equipment Company 
of Hartford, manufacturers of Clark 
Cutaway Harrows and wholesale dis- 
tributors of several other lines of farm 
equipment, took on the complete sponsor- 
ship of the Farmer's Digest in February of 
this year. The Clark Company has five 
minutes of commercial time each day, 
usually divided into five one-minute an- 
nouncements, for different items of equip- 
ment. Commercial copy is furnished by 
an agency with the understanding that it 
will be revised by the farm director to 
make it fit smoothly into the farm news of 
the day and other features of the program. 

As a wholesale distributor, the Clark 
Company brings in frequent mentions of 
retail dealers throughout its territory, 
adding local interest to the commercials. 

Station WTIC retains full control of the 
editorial content of the program, the only 
way that a service program can operate, 
we feel, under a sponsorship arrangement. 

The WTIC Farm Youth Program was 
developed by the station in co-operation 
with the 4-H Clubs, the Vocational Agri- 
culture teachers, and the breeders of pure- 
bred livestock in our area. The station 
set up a revolving fund of $20,000, which 
is used to buy purebred dairy and b eef 
heifers, which are consigned to selected 
4-H Club boys and girls or to Vocational 
Agriculture students. The youngster 
becomes co-owner of the calf with Station 
WTIC and signs a note for the purchase 
price payable, without interest, in two and 
one-half years. The breed associations 
select the calves and determine a fair pur- 
chase price. The 4-H Club agents and the 
Vocational Agriculture teachers supervise 
the care of the animal. Our objective is to 
encourage farm youth to build their own 
herds with good foundation stock. Since 
May 1, we have purchased thirty-eight 
annuals, and we are enjoying the finest 
co-operation possible from all concerned. 
We believe this project is unique, and we 
believe also that it will have far-reaching 
results in encouraging young people to 
become farm operators. 

Walter Johnson 
Assistant General Manager 
WTIC. Hartford 



SPONSOR 



~ 9 & Q ®®®® © #©©©^ Q## ^*»' 



REPEATED RENEWALS 

PROVE 



• • • 





I HIS powerful array of smash-hit, public preferred, sponsor-approved Ziv shows 
is terrific "box office" — delivers the audience! Sensational sales builders for result- 
minded sponsors, they're tops in production, tops in showmanship, tops in Hooper 
ratings, tops in pulling power for sponsors and stations! ^^ 





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renewals! Many other ZIV programs are avail- 
able — for every type of sponsor — to meet even 
selling and promotional requirement: EASY ACES, 
SONGS OF GOOD CHEER, MANHUNT, Uf 
NING JIM, PARENTS' MAGAZINE 
^BEAREST MOTHER, CAREER oP(i| ^%!AIR 
0RBIDDEN DIARY, SPARKY AND Dll i, BEYOND 
REASONABLE D( 

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WDEL 



WILMINGTON 

DEL. 



WGAL 



LANCASTER 

PENNA. 



WKBO 



HARRISBURG 

PENNA. 



WORK 



YORK 

PENNA. 



WRAW 



READING 

PENNA. 



WEST 



EASTON 

PENNA. 



Represented by 

SPM ROBERT MEEKER 



Eg~ A S S O C 1 


A T E S 


J^$ New York 


Chicago 


^V^MI San Francisco • 


Los Angeles 



Clair R. McCollough 
Managing Director 

STEINMAN STATIONS 




Mr. Sponsor 



i». Vernon (owper* 

In charge of Advertising and Sales Promotion 
Bates Fabrics, Inc., New York 



There was no previous Bates Fabrics' advertising history for Vernon 
Cowper to absorb when he was hired, "you-all" accent included, by the 
thoroughly Yankee firm in 1930. There simply wasn't any Bates adver- 
tising. The tall, easy-going North Carolinian had to start from scratch. 
His first assignment was that of promotion man for a 1930 change in the 
Bates distribution. The following year Bates began to advertise in trade 
papers, and Cowper's department expanded rapidly from the original 
battered desk-and-telephone operation. In the following 18 years, Bates 
spent ever-increasing amounts for advertising (mostly color pages in class 
magazines). Cowper now runs a department that includes everything 
from artists to a complete motion picture crew. 

Bates Fabrics, largest U. S. producer of combed fabrics, sells a product 
that lends itself best to visual advertising. In 1947, using magazines and 
newspapers, Bates sold 136,296,041 yards of fabrics and did a gross 
business of $63,755,537. Bates has felt that radio could never tell their 
sales story and so has never used it nationally!. But, the combination 
of Bates and television was as natural as ham and eggs. With a visual 
product to sell, a background of producing fancy retail fashion shows, and 
a movie crew adept at making sales promotion films, Cowper began 
looking in mid- 1948 for a TV show, found it in telegenic Kyle McDonnell 
and Girl About Town. The show went before the NBC-TV cameras in 
September over the "full" network. Bates expects to spend $275,000 
for it, out of a $1,250,000 budget, in 1949. 

Cowper is well aware of the fact that broadcast advertising works 
best when it is well-promoted, both to the trade and to consumers. Bates 
does a big merchandising campaign in TV cities, particularly at point-of- 
sale. Cowper considers it too early to measure the sales effectiveness of 
TV, but it has stirred up tremendous enthusiasm among Bates dealers 
and Cowper feels that his TV advertising is holding its own well. 

In Cowper's home in Scarborough, New York, the family's TV set is 

on more often than it is off. Cowper's two small-fry daughters, Louise 

'h and I lolly (age 6), have taken ovei completely. The moppets are 

already veteran viewers and iat times) withering critics. But, Cowpei 

says with a sigh of relief, the) like "daddy's shows" even the Had ones. 

with his r\ program stars 
'liniis uses selective ruin in \t un<- !<t it > an institutional public relations ;<>'». sponsoring n 
locally produced dramatic shou called tt Do r mi Know Xfaint 



I 



12 



SPONSOR 



ADVERTISEMENT 






H 

MTH 





EI& 



In the most recent survey of North Dakota 
listening Columbia's affiliate, KSJB, led 
all other stations by a margin of two to one. The survey 
was made in seven representative counties . . . none was a 
county having its own radio station. 

There are two main reasons why KSJB leads the field. 
They are programming and power. KSJB takes full ad- 
vantage of Columbia's facilities and builds local shows to 
fit the schedule. North Dakota listeners like that. 

As for power, KSJB reaches out to cover the rich, c )7 
county, tri-state market clearly, consistently, with 5000 



watts unlimited at 600 Kilocycles. By maintaining this 
power day and night they hold and build audience from 
early morning until sign off time. 

The listener trends, charted below, are based on 1711 
calls made by Conlan Surveys in August of this year. Calls 
made in Stutsman, Barnes, Griggs, Foster, Kidder, Logan 
and LaMowre counties, North Dakota. 

For availabilities and complete survey results see your 
Geo. Hollingbery representative or write direct to Station 
KSJB with studios in Jamestown and Fargo, North Dakota. 



21 

20 

19 

18 

17 

16 

15 

14 

13 

12 

II 

10 

9 

8 

7 

6 

5 

4 

3 

2 

I 



6:00 6:15 
P.M. 



6:30 



6:45 



00 7:15 7:30 7:45 8: 
M. P 



00 8:15 8:30 
M. 



:45 9:00 9:15 9:30 9:45 10:00 
P.M. P.M. 





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WF C I 

INTER-OFFICE MEMO 



To 



Mr. Lewis Avery 



jjjew developments on SPONSOR stories 



From 



Wallace A. Walker 



Subject 
Copy to 



Hooper Index 
Adv. Agency- 



Dear Lew: 

Here's one for the 
book — your sales-book , 
that is ! 

Comparing the Evening 
Index for October-Novem- 
ber 1948 vs . the corres- 
ponding period in '47 
WFCI shows an overall 
INCREASE of 46 .5% in 
share of audience . 

No other Rhode Island 
station can make that 
statement - and make it 
stick! 

Best regards 
Wallace A. /Walker 




5000 WATTS 
DAY & NIGHT 



WALLACE A WALKER, Gen. Mgr. 

PROVIDENCE, The Sheroton-Bilimore 

PAWTUCKET, 450 Main St. 



Rtprestmtttivti 

AVERY-KNODEL, INC. 



p.s 



S6CI "Weather is Commercial" 
ISSUe: June 1947, page 13 

How important are seasonal weather warnings in agri- 
cultural areas? 



It's not often that a major network outlet will drop a revenue-bringing 
network show in order to do a public service job with the time slot. It's 
even rarer when the network show is a five-a-week strip. But, that's 
exactly what happened when NBC's Hollywood affiliate, KFI, had to 
choose between carrying the frost warning forecasts beamed at the growers 
of California's citrus crop or carrying Chesterfield Supper Club. Although 
Chesterfield griped bitterly, and much pressure was brought to bear on 
KFI, the West Coast station is still carrying the famous piping-voiced 
weather comments of forecaster Floyd Young, at their usual time. 

Even though KFI has a strong sense of radio's public service responsi- 
bility, dropping Sapper Club was not entirely altruistic on their part. 
KFI surveyed listener reaction to the problem, telling listeners that a 
choice had to be made between the frost warnings and Supper Club. 
According to KFI, the returns were overwhelmingly in favor of continuing 
the frostcasts, with the ratio running nearly 500 to one. To the average 
listener, the frostcasts mean very little. To the citrus grower, with a 
million-dollar crop likely to be wiped out by frost if he isn't careful, it is 
very serious business. To KFI, this meant that in this case the fruit 
growers came first. 

At last report, KFI and Chesterfield have kissed and made up. Chester' 
field Supper Club has returned to KFI (as of 13 Decembei), after having 
had a short run on KMPC, Hollywood where it landed because Newell- 
Emmett, anxious to retain a Hollywood outlet for Liggett & Myers, had 
bought time almost in desperation. Although all the ruffled feathers have 
been smoothed over, both the agency and client have learned that many 
a station takes its weather forecasting very seriously. It is more than 
public service. It is a vital factor in building a station's reputation in the 
community in which it has to dc business. 



P.S 



SeCI Those Mr. and Mrs. Duos 
ISSlie: September 1948, page 53 

Can radio's "Mr. & Mrs." formula be transferred suc- 
cessfully to television? 



The special flavor of radio Mr. & Mrs. shows can come through on tele- 
vision as Ed and Pegeen Fitzgerald have demonstrated with their early 
evening show on WJZ-TV. Theirs is the first regularly televised married 
duo session. Instead of the typical breakfast table setting, the Fitz- 
geralds move easily about a facsimile of their own living room. No one 
first acquainted with them as breakfast-time voices over WJZ would fail 
to recognize their favorites in action on the TV screen. 

The spread of the Mr. & Mrs. formula a sure-fire audience gatherer 
when properly understood and handled — is still slow, because few couples 
seem to grasp the psychology that makes the formula click. In fact, 
Mr. & Mrs. shows that start off hopefully with an approach of the show- 
manship that appeals to one brand of escape-hungry ears are still failing 
because the principals don't quite understand the listener satisfaction 
they are trying to fulfill. Among the shows Sponsor last reported on, 
Merry & Bill Reynolds ( WBMD, Baltimore), and Polly and Perry Martin 
( WLOL, Minneapolis), are now off the air. Others are more than holding 
their own. 

The Johnsons (WBBM, Chicago), who were third in local popularity, 
when sponsor last reported, now top the list with 24 r , of available 
listeners, according to the Pulse of Chicago. 



14 



SPONSOR 



it's easy. 



IF YOU 
KNOW HOW! 



V\/ hy is it that any given radio show may go like a 
house afire in one city, yet barely "get by" in another? You 
(and we) knew that it's often differences in the audiences 
involved. 

For 23 years, we of KWKH have concentrated on knowing 
our audience in this particular section. We've studied our 
own and our competitors' programming, surveyed our listeners, 
kept abreast of likes and dislikes. We know the type of pro' 
gram that pets listeners' attention and buying action from 
every segment of our audience. We "wrote the book" for 
this area ^and are still editing it! 

Let us tell you the whole story. It's unduplicated m the 
Shreveport area. 




KWKH 



Texas 



SHREVEPORT f LOUISIANA 



50,000 Watts 



CBS 



The Branham Company 
Representatives 



A r lean so! 
Mississi 




Henry Clay, General Manager 



3 JANUARY 1949 



15 





On Sunday, September 26th, KVOO 
inaugurated a series of weekly 
programs known as "Assignment 
Progress''. These programs are tell- 
ing the story of construction progress 
on the new S5,000,000.00 First 
National Bank-Sunray Oil Company 
Building, in Tulsa. 

Featured element in this First National sponsored program are the voices of the men who 
build this structure — the excavators, steel workers, carpenters, painters, architects, con- 
tractor and many others. By means of wire recording these men are interviewed on the 
job and describe the work they perform. Designed to do a job of capital-labor relations 
and to keep the public informed of week by week progress, the program is attracting a 
large and interested audience. 

"Assignment Progress", a KVOO originated program idea, is another first in a long 
record of achievement! It demonstrates, once again, the kind of program leadership 
which has made and will continue to keep KVOO Oklahoma's Greatest Station/ 



RADIO STATION KVOO 



50.000 WATTS 



EDWARD PETRY AND CO.. INC. NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



OKLAHOMA'S CREATEST STATION 



TULSA. OKLA, 



16 



SPONSOR 



tJANl I/O 1949 




New and renew 



p 2 






New National Selective Business 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT 



AGENCY 



STATIONS 



CAMPAIGN, start, duration 



Brown & Williamson rob * ■■ Cools 
Carter Products, Inc 



I)r \ W chase Medicine 

( . Ltd 
Chrysler < orp < hrysler I ' i v ) 

( rowen-CoUier Pub I ■ 

Dennison's Food t ■ • 

General FiM>ds Corn 
!*■ >-» t Cereals DiV) 
General Motors t "rp 

(Oldsmoblle l:iv) 
North Eastern Suppl] Co 

Reddi-Wbip i o 

Standard Brands. Inc 
Vamoose Products 

\ ick Chemical Co 



\ arious medical 

products 
Various patent 

medicitn s 
Automobiles 

•"Colliers"' 

Dennison Fix.d 

Products 
(.rape- Nuts 

l*»4*» Futuramic 
OidsmobOe 

Farm suppl it g 

Food products 

Bluebonnet 
Margarine 

Household 
Deodorant 



Ted Bates 

Ted Bates 

F. 1C. Hayhurst 

nto) 
NKt .inn- 1 I 

kudner 

Brisacher, \\ heeler 

Young & Ruhicam 

l> P. Brother 

Peck 

Ruthrauff & Ryan 

Ted Bans 

M (,len Miller 



anncmts: Jan .«: 1 ; 
Re-entering manj BsXW mkts) 

- si}* 1-min e.t. spots, anncmts; Jan 3: 

Medium-sin and small mkts 

■strollin" Tom." 15-min e.t ■ 
Major Canadian n - - ed: Dec 13; l«»k< 

. . ""The American Way." 5-min 

Dealer-mfr campaign, natl) e.t.'s: as sched; Dec- Jan: 13 wks 

1-min live. e.t. q cc: 

(Limited nati campaign. 27 mk - 

••Bob Garred ! " TThSat 

CBS Pacif net. May add cthei 25pm. PST; Jan 6; 52 wks 



W ( entral ft S. F. mkts) 

i Natl can-.paiii n. all 

N I mkts. farm pr_ 

12-20 
(Western & Mm mkts) 

i 



'Station list .«<•/ a! p ■ 



Professor Oi-iz." iO-min 
■ led : Jan 19; 13 
F.t. anncmts: Dec 1 3- Jan 1: \i 

wks 
Live splits in panic farm shows: 

Dec-Jan: 13 wks 
1-min e.t. spots, anncmts: Jan 1 : 

13 wks 
1-min e.t. spots, anncmts: Jan .s; 
N W. and F. mkts: n-.av expand 

Live, e.t. spots: Jan 1 : 13 wks 
Midwest mkts. ma] expand 
test campaign) 

25-S ■ is. anncmts: Dec 1" 

s pplementii 



Vick colo remedies Morse 




New and Renewed on Television (Network and Selective) 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET OR STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Vmerican Chicle t .■ 



American Stores 
(Food chain) 



B.idcer and Browning 
„\ [ferae] 



wi VI-TV. Phila. 
u ( \ I - I \ N \ 



American 1 oba< co t o 


N w [Ayei 


NBC-1\ net 
WMAL-T\ Wash 

WBK.B. Chi. 
s 11 \ 1 v. 


Atlantic Refining t o 


N w Vyei 


NBC-TV net 


Bank of America 


Charles R. Stuart 


kFI-l\ I \ 


Barbasol Co 


1 ruin Wasej 


t Its- I \ net 


Borden Co (Cheeses) 


Young & Ruhicam 


WPIX, V V. 


Botanj Worsted Mills 


Silberstein-s toldsmitb 


\vpi\ n -) 


Brown .S. Williamson 

1 kools) 
t clomat Corp 


led Bates 


WJZ-TV. N > 


Iraq - Kent 


WPIX N. Y. 


1 \ U-Scope l*\ lens) 






Colgate- PalmollTe- Peel 


I st> 


N1U . 1 \ net 


E. L. Cournand ( o 


I a> ton 


KTLA. L. A. 


1 w alco T\ letls> 






Delta Air Lines. Inc 


Burke Dowting Adams 


WBkB. Chi. 


Disnej . Inc tllats) 


Grey 


NIU - I \ net 


Allen B. DuMont Labs. Inc 


Buchanan 


WGN-TV, Chi. 


General Foods Corp (Jello) 


N oung ft Rublcam 


NHt - l\ net 


General Mills 


Knox- Reel es 


W VBD, N i| 


i WheatJes, Biaquick etc) 






General Motors Corp 


( lampbell-EwaM 


NBC-I\ net 


( hevrolel Div | 


(Oi N 1 


WPIX N \ 


Gulf Oil Corn 


> oung X Rublcam 


NIU - I \ net 


Lewis Howe t !o 


Ruthrauff ft Ryan 


WPIX N. v 
WCBs- 1\ N N 


Liggett x Myers 


Newell-Fmmett 


CBS- ]\ net 


1 l hestertleldsi 




Wi \1 . Phila. 
WPIX N v 


Motorola, Inc 


( .ourfaln-Cobb 


kSl P- 1 \ Minn 


Austin Nichols ft t ■ ■ 


Alfred 1 .illy 


WPIX N v 


Peter Paul. Inc 


Platt-Forb.s 


W J / - 1 \ N \ 


Piel Eros. (Piel's Beer) 


1 S|V 


WPIX N 1 


Pioneer Scientific Corp 


l IV foil 


ksl P- 1 V. Minn 


(Polaroid TV filter) 




W 1 MJ- I \ . Milw 
wt.N- i\ Chi. 

W J / - 1 \ N 1 
W( \l - 1 \ Pbil.i 



Film anncmts before Madison Square Garden events: D 

thru season to Mar J 
Modern Living — Kmerican Plan: TuTh .s-.C.stl pm: Nov lt>: 

I .< w s - 
Your Show lime (film): Fri 0-30-10 pm: Jan 21; 52 w's- 
Film spots. I) t > - n) 

Film spots: Dei - 

I of Penna. home basketball ilames: Sat as sched: l>ec 11: 

Familv Quiz; 10-min film weekly as sched; Dec 5; 13 w's. 

Week in Review: M I'W IF 10-11)15 pm; Jan J: K* »ks (n) 

Film spots following telecast sports: Jan ^t' - 

Weather anncmts; N'tn I s . 13 wka 

New York knickerbockers' pro basketball ilames; Sat nite as 

sched; Not U-Mar -'. 
Film s|Hits betw Ridview,**! Grove wrestling bouts: Th betw 

- ■ M> pm; Jan »; 13 whs 
The Colgate Theater; Mon 0-0:30 pm: Jan 3; 52 «ks (n) 
Film panic weekly in wrestling bouts: Jan 5; 13 »k> 

Film spots: Jan .«; 4 ws, 

I of the Week; Sun 7 -20-7 -39pm ^ K ss r ) 

Film partic in "Chicagotand Newsreel": MTWTF as sched; 

Dec h; l.s wks (n) 
Vuthor Meets the Critics: ^un 8-8 MJ pm: Jan 2. ?J wks 
red Steele Show; MTWTF U-i'-l pm; De« -- rks 

Chevrolet I heater: Mon B-8:3t pm: Dec 27; 52 wks 

Film spots: Jan 10; .' wks v n) 

t.ulf Road show; Hi 0-9:30 pm: Jan t. : l« wk- 

Film spots: Dec Jj: 13 wks 

Film spots: Dec 22: 13 w K , 

Arthur Godfrej Show: Wed 8-0 pm : Jan 1^: 52 wl 

Film spots before White Plains boxing bouts. Jan 5; 13 w^. 

New \.Tk Giants home baseball tames; Apr-S - - n as 

sched; o) 
I i\e film si>- ts during higb school basketball: WThF is sched; 

l"-Mar " 
Film sivts: Dec 12; -' rks 
Film spots; N'oi 1 1 : 10 wka 
Weather anncmts: Dec lt>: 13 »k. 
Film s . N i ) 2b wka 
Film spot - rks 

Film si- :~ \ . 28 -•• wks v n) 
Film s[v,>rs during Intermiss] - Knickerbocker basketball; 

I kec 8 tin u Mar It' 
Film spots following VVhite Plains boxing bouts; Jan 5; 13 wl 



■^ lii in* xi issue: >«'\\ «ni«l | a «'m>\\ «'«l on \oi\\ork«*. S|i«»nsor Per- 
sonnel < li.-inuroi. N.nion.il IBroaoJcasi Salt's Exeeative Changes^ 

I\e\v Ageno'v \|i|Miini iih'im s 



A 



Seeman Bi •>. "> Tarcher WJ/.-TV. V V. 

(White Rose rea) 

Skin-Tested Prods Co Jasper. Lynch & Flsbel w.l/-i\ N 1. 

I-Denl toothpaste) 

Sterling Drug, Inc (various) Dancer-Fitzgerald- WABD, N. Y. 

Sample 

Unique Art Mfg. Co Grant SSSrvUSi 



Weathei anncmts; Jan 2; 13 wks (n) 

New Ncirk Knickerbocker's pro basketball games; Sat nlte as 

sched; Nox II -Mar 22 (n) 
Okay Mothei . Ml W I F 1-1:30 pm; Doc 14; 52 wks (n) 

Film spots: Dec Ml; 13 wks (r) 

Howdy Doo.ly; Frl 5:45-6 pm; Deo 31; 13 wks (r) 



Advertising Agency Personnel Changes 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



David K. Altman 
Stead man Beckwith 
Riley Brow n 
01 to S. Bruck 
John II. Butler 
Evert n (.antor 
Harry Carter 
Mark R. Castle 
Elliott Corliss 

Leona D' Ambry 
John de Bevec 
Robert Diserens 
Courtlandt I'. Dixon 
Sherman k. Ellis 
Richmond H. Gallej 
Doris Gilbert 
Mian C. Gottschaldt 
Frank Grosjean 
Leslie Harris 

Richard T. Hawkins 
Joseph Home Holmes Jr 
David Horwich 
Frederick Ingalls 
Ogden Knlffin 
Mary Lewis 
William B. Lowther 
Lathrop Mack 
T. R. McCabe 
Thomas M . McDonnell 
Edward \. Merrill .lr 
Joseph P. Moore 
l rban H. Moss 
Dorothy A. Nelson 
clarence R. Palmer 
Sally Paul 
.1. Nell Reagan 

\rthur H. Rich 

Henry Rich 

Joseph R. Rollins Jr 

Albert M. Seldler it 
Gerald F. Selinger 

Arnold C. Shaw 
John G. Simonds 
Joseph G. Smalley 
Joseph H. Smith 
I.. J. Swain 

W illiam Travis 
Henry R. Turnbull 
Ralph Van Buren 
B M Walberg 
Sol s Waldman 

latins (. Walker 

Robert J. Weill 
Robert Welsberg 

MaUlice S. Weiss 

Donald I Wyatt 



Women's Reporter. N. V., adv mgr 

(.ray & Rogers. Phila.. copy writer 

Duhin. Plttsb. 

Adair & Director. N. 1 

Lester L. Wolff, N. "* .. chairman of the hoard 

Advertising Ideas, N. Y., acct exec 

Chilton < •» 



I at ham-Laird, Chi., acct exec 

Doherty, Clifford & Shenfield, N. Y., acct exec 

Buchanan, N. Y., acct exec 

Sherman K. Kllis. N. Y.. head 

Carr-Consolldated Biscuit Co, Chi., adv mtr 

Badger & Browning, Boston, acct exec 

WJW, Cleve. 

Benton & Bowles, N. Y., directing, producing 

shows 
GUdden Co. Canada. adv mgr 
Young & Rubicam, N. Y. 

Forest Lawn Co, L. A. 

w iiss iv Geller, N. Y., acct exec 

Badger & Browning. Boston, acct exec 
KFOX, Long Beach Calif., acct exec 
Beaumont & Ilohman. Cleve.. mgr 
Foote, Cone & Beldlng, N. Y., radio dept 
Young & Rubicam, S. F., acting mgr 
Ormshee, Moore & Gilbert, MUford Conn. 
VanSant, Dugdale, Balto., traffic mgr 
Howard -Wesson, Worcester Mass. 
Benjamin F.shleman. Phila., media dir 
Botsford. Constantino & Gardner, S. F. 
M, ( ann-Frickson, H'wood., radio prodn head 
Rich Ice Cream Co, purchasing agent 



Winchester Repeating Arms Co. \ % 
John Falkner Arndt. Phila. 

(, \l Basford, N. Y., acct exec 
llaire Publications, N. Y. 

John A. Cairns. N. V., exec vp 

Lester C. Nielson, Huntington Park Calif., acct 

exec 
l.eland K. Howe. N. Y. 

Dancer-Fltzgerald-Sample, N. Y., acct exec 

Ruthraufi & Ryan. N. Y., vp. sec 

Cramer-Krasselt . Mllw., acct exec 

Sheerr Brothers & Co, N. Y.. adv mgr 

Newell-Emmett, N. Y.. acct exec 

I .ester Harrison. N ^ 

l.eland k. Howe, V V., vp, art dir 

exec 
kaiser Co Inc (Iron cs Stool div), adv mgr 



Irving Serwer, N. Y., acct exei 

Julian Brightman, Cambridge Mass acct exec 

Same, radio dept copy chief 

Glenn. Dallas, co-head 

Botsford, Constantlne & Gardner, "si acct exec 

Mann-Ellis, N. Y., acct exec 

Same, radio. TV dir 

Harry Graff. N. V, act t exec 

Alanson (.). Bailey, San Diego, radio. TV head (under name 

of Elliott CurtlSS Productions) 
David S. Hillman, L. A., tlmebuyer 
Same, media dir 

Hewitt, ogilvy, Benson e^ Mathi r N J acct exec 
Same, vp In chgo creative management 
Mi vrthur, vp, dir 
Caples, Omaha Neb., acct exec 
Edwin Parkin. N. Y.. media dir 
Same, vp 

Decker, Canton ()., radio copy dept head 
Same, head radio activities 

Walsh. Out.. Windsor acct exe< 

Dancer-Fitzgerald & Sample, N. Y., vp 

Raymond Spector. N. Y., vp in chge creative. I \ activities 

Brisacher. Wheeler & Staff, L. A., acct exec 

kenyon K; Eckhardt, N. Y., acct exec 

l.eland K. Howe, N. Y., acct exec, fashion coordinator 

Same, vp 

Davls-Harrlson-Simonds, H'wood., vp. gen mgr 

Same, Chi., exec i|i 

Same, radio dir 

Same, mgr 

Lindsay, New Haven Conn., vp 

Same, media, research dir 

Leonard Davis, Worcester Mass., radio script dept head 

John Falkner Arndt, Phila., media dir 

Kaufman, Chi., media dir 

Same, mgr 

Rolzen, Buffalo N. Y., acct exec 

Barton A. Stebbins, L. A., acct exec 

Benjamin Eshleman, Phila., media dir 

Edwards, Newark N. J., acct exec 

John Miller, Norristown Pa., mgr 

Glenn, Dallas, co-head 

Daniel F. Sullivan. Portland Me., acct exec, mgr 

Mann-Ellis, N. Y., acct exec- 
Same, Montreal Canada, head 
Martin R. Klitten, L. A., acct exec 

Same, vp In chge radio 

Same, vp 

Ralph Van Buren (new). \. Y.. head 

John Mather Lupton, N. Y., acct exec 

Norman D. Waters N \ acct exec 

Bermlngham. Cast Ionian & Pierce, S \ acct exei 

Dorland, N. >, .. acct e\<-, 

Robert Whitchill (new), N. Y., pros 

Smallen-Ross, N. Y., acct exec 

Ryder & Ingram, Oakland Calif., acct exec 



Station Representation Changes 



STATION 



AFFILIATION 



K.BK.O, Portland Ore. 


1 ndependent 


kl>> L-T\ salt Lake Cltj 


NBC 


k REM Spokane W asli 


[ndependent 


KS.IO. Sao Jose < '1 


Independent 


KTLA.l V. < 1 V > 


Independent 


k LSI 1 v. (TV) 


Independent 


WBKB, Chi 


Independent 


HI 1 \l Wash (FM) 


Continental 


WDAR, Savannah Ga 


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Independent 


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1 mil pendent 


W 1 \( .. San Juan P. R. 


1 ndependent 


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NEW NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



Forjoe 

Blair 
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MORE IOWA RADIOS 

MEAN MORE IOWA LISTENERS! 




l J8 ( /( of Iowa homes have radios, 
11.8% have two or more sets, an<l 11.8 1 , 
have three or more, according to the 
1948 Iowa Radio Audience Survey*. 

This extra-set ownership means more 
listening throughout the (lav. In the 
morning, for instance, it means 6.9' , 
more women and 5.9*7 more men 
listeners. 

The Survey's authoritative figures 
about multiple-set homes in Iowa 
constitute one of the several new and 
extremely important findings of the 
1948 Edition. In addition to this 
"new information not previously gathered, 
the Survey gives up-to-date facts on 
almost every possible phase of Iowa 
listenership. 

Write for your copy today, or ask 
Free & Peters. 



* The 1948 Iowa Kadio Audience Survey in a "must" 
for every advertising, sales, or marketing man who is 
Interested in the Iowa sales-potential. 

The 1948 Edition is the eleventh annual study of 
radio listening hahits in Iowa. It was condueted by 
Dr. F. L. Whan of Wichita University and his staff, is 
hased on personal interviews of 9,224 Iowa families, 
scientifically selected from the city, town, village and 
farm audience. 

As a service to the sales, advertising, and research 
professions. WHO will gladly send a copy of the 1948 
Survey to anyone interested in the subjects covered. 



WHO 

+ /©r Iowa PLUS + 

Des Moines . . . 50,000 Watts 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 

P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 

FREE & PETERS, INC., National Representatives 



3 JANUARY 1949 



19 



» 




L 



NORTH CAROLINA IS THE SOUTH'S 

NUMBER ONE STATE 
AND NORTH CAROLINA'S 



50,000 WATTS 680 KC NBC AFFILIATE • RALEIGH, N. C. 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE FREE 6- PETERS, INC. 



m 




CEREALS and how they're sold 

Selling appeal changes, but radio remains favorite medium 



A Sponsor studv 



Breakfast food advertising is 
a $30,000,000 game of follow- 
the-leader, played all over the media map. 
It produces results — more than $500,000,- 
000 is spent annually in the U. S. for hot 
and cold breakfast foods. Breakfast food 
advertising most frequently changes direc- 
tion overnight, and even today has no 
single school of thought as to its basic 
appeal. In spite of about faces cereal 
air advertising is generally successful. 

No one firm in the breakfast food 
field has been a pace-setter for the indus- 
try in its advertising techniques. Nearly 
all the makers of breakfast foods have 



their own pet theory on what really sells 
their product, particularly in broadcast 
advertising where 50% of all cereal ad 
dollars are spent. However, almost as 
soon as one manufacturer goes on a radio 
or TV tangent of his own with success, the 
other firms in the field switch over to or 
add similar programs. 

There have been cycles in the selling 
and advertising of breakfast foods since 
the day in 1875 when an observant young 
interne named Dr. John Kellogg saw a 
future in prepared cereal foods as "health 
diets." More often than not, these adver- 
tising cycles have been motivated by ex- 
pediency. This has been true especially 
of radio, and has been repeating itself 
in TV. 



As the 1949 broadcast advertising cycle 
gets underway, the air-advertising of 
breakfast foods is fairly evenly distributed 
among basic program types. The air 
shows of 90% of the major manufac- 
turers of everything from corn flakes 
,to farina break down into these special 
categories: 

Percent 

Adult SS% 

Semi-adult 25% 

Children 25% 

uly 17% 

The most recent vehicle employed to 
sell cold cereals* is a West Coast c im 



treats are uted >>■ ' I lilies 

II ,: reals or,- ,, S . le kiml 

used txclusineb The relative amounts nary with 
inal tastes. 



Or<»al «-vH«* of radio ;»«m»* round antl round 




P x L mOO Paul Wing tells stories 

OePiember lUOZ [or the wee ones to sell 

r General; Food cereals 



■ *fk in Bob Emery is telling stones en 

JanU3ry 1949 TV Small Fry ClubJDuMont) 



advertise all Post cereals 




... have outlived most cereal programs ■■■ ■ • 

Westerns ..wita„,»Th.Lon.R.n3«"ABc All American 

which continues selling Lheenos 



boy appeal has also outlasted 
most shows. Above Jack 
Armstrong for G-M products 



paign by the 51-year-old Kellogg Co., 
whose last year's net sales of some 
$90,000,000 led the field and accounted 
for nearly a third of the total business 
done in dry cereals. Kellogg starts spon- 
sorship 8 January of a show whose basic 
appeal is to the family audience. The 
program is an audience participation 
show. Mother Knows Best, aired Saturday 
mornings from 12-12:30 p.m. on 30 
Columbia-Pacific stations. The show 
will be transcribed in New York, and 
aired from KNX. It is fail ly typical of 
the "family'' shows being used by break- 
fast food firms, some others being Pro' 
fessor Quiz (sponsored by Post Cereals 
Division of General Foods on an e.t. 
basis in 25 west cential and southeastern 
markets for Grape-Nuts Flakes), and 
Breakfast Club (sponsored by General 
Mills, across-the-board on weekday morn- 
ings, and featuring a variety of G-M 
products, including breakfast cereals). 

The shows whose appeal is primarily 
"adult" are aimed generally at the day- 
time audience of homemakers. General 
Mills sponsors two daytime strips, Today's 
Children and Light of the World, to sell 
Wheaties and Cheerios to women, stress- 
ing primarily the themes of "good family 
breakfast" and "healthy bodies for 
youngsters." General Foods' Post Divi- 
sion sells Postum (a cereal drink) and 
Post Bran Flakes, primarily an adult 
cereal for dietary reasons, to the house- 
wife via Portia Faces Life, which G-F has 
sponsored since 1940. They are good 
examples of the selling of breakfast foods 
to the adult audience, a cycle that aired at 
its greatest emphasis during the rationed 
war years. 

One West Coast advertiser, Fisher 
Flouring Mills Co., sells to an afternoon 
audience of homemakers via a five- 
times-weekly newscast called Afternoon 
Headlines on ABC's Pacific network. The 
show, whose selling emphasis is on 
Fisher's hot wheat cereal, "Zoom," is 



Nighttime 1938 £Z 



ell Gr 



earce was trying, with his gang, to sell ^rape- 
General Foods on NBC. He didn't last 



Nighttime 1942 



Jack Benny ended the nighttime breakfast food cycle 
selling Grapenuts Flakes for General Foods on NBC 




the latest in a Fisher cycle of radio adver- 
tising that began when "Zoom" was 
introduced six years ago on the West 
Coast with city-by-city campaigns. At 
that time, in 1942, the radio appeal was 
also to the daytime audience, since 
Fisher was using spots in women's 
participation shows plus selective an- 
nouncements. In addition to Afternoon 
Headlines, Fisher's broadcast advertising 
today includes a large list of Oregon, 
Washington, and California stations carry- 
ing selective announcements, 15 news- 
casts per week on Fisher-owned KOMO 
(Seattle), and TV announcements on 
Seattle's KRSC-TV. Nearly all of it 
is aimed at either the homemaker aud- 
ience, or at least at the adult audience. 

The "semi-adult" show is usually one 
of a highly adventurous nature, that 
appeals to the older adolescent and the 
adult who enjoys blood-and-thunder. A 
good instance of this is The Lone Ranger, 
sponsored by General Mills since 1941 for 
Corn Kix on a three-time-weekly basis. 
The latest example is National Biscuit 
Company's 40-market coverage in selec- 
tive radio with the e.t. Red Ryder (Lou 
Cowan) show, a sort of second-cousin to 
Lone Ranger and the network Straight 
Arrow show on Mutual, both of which are 
starting their selling jobs for Shredded 
Wheat with the 1949 season. 

The air shows of the major breakfast 
food advertisers that are aimed primarily 
at the juvenile market include two that 
are among radio's oldest vehicles for the 
selling of breakfast foods to the kiddies — 
General Mills' Jack Armstrong for 
Wheaties, and Ralston's Tom Mix for 
Hot Ralston and Instant Ralston. In 
TV, General Foods' Post Division has 
been selling all the Post cereals in turn on 
DuMont's Small Fry telecasts (it shares 
sponsorship with several advertisers). 

This is the picture today. The selling 
emphasis of the industry leaders is now 
aimed at the housewife. Research in 




Premiums made and broke the juvenile cycle of radio programs. They still make kids buy 



recent yeais has shown that about 70% 
of cereal purchasing is influenced by 
women, 20% by men, and the 10% differ- 
ence is shared by both, so the advertising 
aimed at women is understandable. 
However, there has been a recent up- 
swing in the number of breakfast food 
shows in radio and TV that appeal to both 
children and semi-adult age groups. 

The trend is, more than anything else, 
history repeating itself. It was to children 
that Kellogg aimed a good portion of its 
advertising as early as 1898. In the years 
that followed the turn of the century, and 
during which most of the leading cereal 
companies got their start, advertising 
urging the nation's moppets to persuade 
their parents to buy So-and-So's Corn 



Flakes slackened in favor of advertising 
that stressed some highly questionable 
medical and health claims. This was the 
era that saw the emergence of Kellogg, 
Post, Quaker, Cream of Wheat, and 
Ralston as major entries in the race to 
sell breakfast foods. During the 20's, 
after the government began to keep a 
strict eye on advertising claims, the 
health advertising was switched to vitamin 
copy and taste-appeal claims. It wasn't 
until 1929 that the great cycle of juvenile 
breakfast food advertising got under way 
in earnest. 

The Minneapolis, firm of Cream of 
Wheat was the first to use radio slanted 
directly to the juvenile taste. In January 
(Please turn to page 65) 



Dowtimo 1QQ1 h was with "Raising Junior" on the Blue network, fllt/timo 1 Q /I Q General Foods is using "Portia Faces Life" to sell Post Toasties 
UdyillllC 1301 that Wheatena tried to raise tears and heartthrobs Udj lllllC 1340 and Bran Flakes on NBC having started on CBS, October 1940 





y 







The Peter Paul Formula 

Candy manufacturer finds newscasts result-protlucing. 
Virtually entire advertising budget goes into radio and television 





Since 1937, one of radio's out- 
standing selective operations 
has been quietly and carefully 
put together by the Connecticut candy- 
making firm of Peter Paul, Inc. It's not 
too difficult to find selective campaigns 
bigger than the 390 programs and 140 
announcements aired each week for Peter 
Paul over 126 stations. It would, how- 
ever, be difficult to find a campaign con- 
ducted with a bettet understanding of the 
radio-selling techniques involved, or which 
produces better results. What makes the 
selective campaigns that sell Peter Paul's 
Mounds, Almond Joy, Choclettos etc. 
differ sharply from those of other adver- 
tisers is that the campaigns revolve 
around a central programing axis: news- 
casting. 

It is with radio news, a widely misused 
form of air selling, that Peter Paul have 
built a radio operation that costs them 
some $1,500,000 a year, nearly the entire 
Peter Paul ad budget, and which pro- 
duces some $35,000,000 annually in candy 
business. This places the Connecticut 
firm in the top five bar-goods manufac- 
turers in the $1,000,000,000 (wholesale) 
candy industry. 

Like most consistent radio users, Peter 
Paul give credit to broadcast advertising 
for a healthy sales picture. Radio has 
produced consistent]) for them since 
their near-accidental discovery in Novem- 
ber, 1937 that their number one selling 
vehicle in radio was news. They had 
entered the field of radio-news selling for 
the first time with a series of 1 -minute 
participations on Yankee Network News. 
When the program began to bring in 
definite sales results at the candy counters 
of New England, it set a pattern for Peter 
I '.nil advertising which has never changed, 
except for gradual improvements in the 
technique. The best indication of the fact 
that Peter Paul air advertising works well 
can be found in their published earnings 
in the decade since 1937. 



Year 
1937 
1938 
1939 
1940 
1941 
1942 
1943 
1944 
1945 
1946 
1947 



Net Income Earned per snare 



$2.55 
$2.61 
$3.27 
$4.28 
$4.14 
$3.65 
$5.20 
$4.59 
$3.99 
$2.92 
$3.94 



$379,333 

$388,366 

$485,228 

$636,144 

$614,688 

$542,383 

$791,730 

$7 17.380 

$667,507 
$1,952,020 
$2,682,155 

The rise is swift and relatively steady 
except for the war years, and has been 
based on a combination of honest business 
practices: — a good product and well-con- 
ceived advertising. Peter Paul's margin 
of profit per unit is on the low end of the 
bar-goods industry (it runs as high as 20% 
sometimes for manufacturers who "load" 
their candy bars). It is probably about 
6%. Peter Paul began, in a New Haven 
kitchen in 1919, when a group of six 
friends (including the late P-P president, 
Calvin K. Kazanjian and the present top 
executive, George Shamlian, as well as a 
man whose name really was Peter Paul) 
founded the firm that has in the past 30 
years made few compromises with qual- 
ity. This has held true, even dining the 
erratic war years, when coconut and 
chocolate supply was sharply curtailed. 

Since the start of Peter Paul broadcast 
advertising, the candy firm has discovered 
an increasing number of reasons why 
some newscasts work well . . . and some 
don't. Such a fund of specialised knowl- 
edge has been acquired by the Platt- 
Forbes agency (P-P agency for every- 
thing east of the Rockies; Brisacber, 
Wheeler is agency for P-P in the Moun- 
tain and Coast sectors) that agenc) radio 
director Sherman E. Rogers once even 
authored s booklet, Four Billion Ears, on 
newscasting. 

The major lesson that Peter Paul have 
learned is that newscasts sell best, and 
attract the highest audiences, when they 
are used on a selective basis.* From time 
to time, however, Peter Paul have used 



\. , . with a local tlant u tops with '/»<■ neri 



Typical frames from a Peter Paul TV film 



* ^B — 



i 



V 




It 



f2 



■tobvi 



M 



I 



r w 




.8 / V^ 

7 VS. 




§i 




Li 




I Vi c i- I*;miI*h .1 iH'wsr.isriiij: rules 



i. 



4 



A news period has to be on the air for at least two years in 
order to develop top audiences for commercial sponsorship 

Buy news programs originating on individual stations. They've 
advantages over network news via local items and weather 

Five-minute newscasts seldom develop the faithful regular 
audience of regularly scheduled 15-minute news programs 

Newscasters should stick to news and leave selling to an- 
• nouncers who are salesmen not reporters or commentators 

News scripts should be written with an eye to the personality 
and the particular style of the man who broadcasts the program 



A typical newsroom (WOR, N. Y.) from which Peter Paul newscasts originate all over the United States. Peter Paul's Prescott Robinson at left 



^through Brisacher, Wheeler) regional 
newscasts on the Pacific Coast networks 
of ABC, NBC, CBS, and Mutual. Cur- 
rently, there are two newscast strips 
(MWF 5:45-5:55 p.m., and TThS 7:30- 
7:45 a.m.) featuring Bob Garred on the 
Columbia Pacific Network, which Peter 



Paul have used on and off since 1940. 

The use of regional Pacific Coast net- 
work newscasts combined with selective 
newscasts in the rest of the nation is not 
as contradictory as it may sound. There is 
a definite reason for it. One Peter Paul 
agency man s&ates: "Sure, we use regional 



networks in the Mountain and West Coast 
sections. That's because Peter Paul feel 
that individual stations on the Coast do 
not go to the trouble to develop that all- 
important habit of listening to newscasts 
that you find in the East and Midwest. 
(Please turn to page 54) 



3 JANUARY 1949 



25 




J 



PARI SEVEN 



OF 



SERIES 




They insist that advert ising isn't part of their business 



over-all 



"If an advertising man will 
take the time off to check the 
number of items the average supply 
dealer salesman has to peddle, he'll under- 
stand why selling advertising isn't among 
them." That's the way the vp of a drug 
wholesaler explains why his salesmen are 
radio's (as well as general advertising's) 
greatest road block. That he isn't as 
much a road block to printed media as he 
is to broadcasting is best explained by the 
fact that black and white advertising can 
be seen. Broadcast advertising's greatest 
problem in reaching the men who reach 
the retailer is that the spoken word is 
ephemeral, except in its consumer sales 
impact. Generally, commercials can't be 
imprisoned in proof form in a manner 
through which the middleman can hear 
for himself just what is being done on the 
air. 

Says a sales executive of a Midwest 
diug jobber, "In less than 20% of the ac- 
counts we represent are we ever informed 
of their radio advertising plans. When 
we do hear of what's being done to adver- 
tise some of the pharmaceuticals, the 
broadsides are usually so confused or so 
badly prepared that they're no assistance 
whatsoever to us or to the products they 
an supposed to help us sell. Someday 
some drug firms are going to realize that 
a good consumer advertising man fre- 
quently makes a putrid trade promotion 
executive. What drug firms generally 
give theii own sales staff is bad enough 
promotion for their radio advertising but 
what they give their jobbers' staffs is 
worse. Before any advertising man is 
permitted to prepare promotion material 
(radio or otherwise) for salesmen he ought 
to be required to work a week with one. 
Once Ih's made the rounds, he won't 
spend his firm's money for a lot oi words 
and prett) pictures that neither intrigue 
nor reveal the true advertising story in 
terms the salesman < an use 



"You have to sell advertising in terms 
that the distributor type of sales mind 
will understand," was this drug jubber's 
parting remark. 

"Figures have absolutely no impact on 
our sales staff — except those figures which 
apply to their own sales quotas," is the 
way one electrical appliance supply 
dealer debunked big circulation figures. 
"When brochures talk in terms of millions 
of listeners or readers, as they most often 
do, they mean little or nothing to sales- 
men who think only in terms of the couple 
of hundreds of retailers they service each 
month. Salesmen who cover the retail 
front don't get too excited about national 
advertising circulation figures. In fact 
they aren't excited today about any form 
of national advertising. They've been 
'millioned to death.' 

"If an advertiser wants action from the 
sales staffs of distributors he must stop 
48-state thinking and design broadsides 
and sales promotion material that speaks 
in terms of local and regional sales terri- 
tories. It's important of course to estab- 
lish that a program is broadcast over a 
network, if it is, but what is essential is to 
establish that it is broadcast by important 
stations in our area. Men only collect 
commissions on what they sell — not on 
what's sold thousands of miles away. 

"You can't sell the (town name deleted) 
merchandising area by explaining that 
nun broadcasts are reaching 90,000,000 
listeners; we haven't that number of 
prospects." 

When most wholesalers are confronted 
by the charges of inertia in promoting 
either advertising of products they dis- 
tribute, they explain brusquely, that pro- 
motion is not their job. Even those 
wholesalers who maintain sizable promo- 
tion departments* admit that they only 
do a tin) pari ol the promotion that could 
be done. The) know that they would do 

a better job for the lines the) represent if 



they really promoted all the products they 
distribute, but that, they insist, would in- 
crease their cost of doing business to such 
an extent that they'd operate in the red. 
"Our margin of profit," states a medium 
size building supply dealer, "is so small 
that we have nothing to gain in promoting 
any of our nationally advertised brands. 
We're simply a central source of the 
materials a builder uses. He has to in- 
stall exactly what an architect specifies or 
at least a reasonable facsimile. For us to 
promote the advertising of any of our 
products would be a waste of time." 

When this particular supply dealer was 
queried directly about Johns-Manville 
products of this asbestos firm he admitted 
that the broadcast program down through 
the years had brought considerable busi- 
ness to him (he's a J-M supply dealer 
among other products) but he didn't see 
what promoting that fact would get him. 
"It's the job of the manufacturer to 
create the demand for his product, not his 
distributors'. I feel that advertising is 
included in the consumer price, and since 
generally the manufacturer sets the resale 
price, not the distributor, he must carry 
the ad-burden," is the way a number of 
big and little building supply dealers ex- 
plained their lack of advertising promo- 
tion or selling of manufacturers' adver- 
tising. 

"The field of product distribution has 
become more and more of a wholesale 
giant-market operation," states a food 
executive. "The margin of profit is so 
small, the cost of operation has increased 
so substantially, and the pressure exerted 
on us to produce quantity sales has be- 
come so great that we can't afford to do 
anything to indoctrinate our customers on 
what our manufacturers are doing. More 
and more I feel that the problem of telling 
the retailer what's going on in the food 



*Leu than 3' , of all wholesaler* 



26 



SPONSOR 



advertising field must be the job of the 
manufacturers' field representatives. In 
a few instances we have been given a 
special per-case allotment for detailing 
and we have employed special promotion 
salesmen whose job is to cover retailers 
and impress them with the promotion 
that is being placed behind specific 
products. Frankly I have never been able 
to prove that the detailing did us any 
good." 

Asked why he hadn't been able to check 
the effectiveness of the detailing, the food 
merchandiser stated, "There's no margin 
for research in a wholesaler's budget," and 
refused to discuss the matter further. 

It's a sad commentary on merchandis- 
ing but the men who contact retailers 
most regularly, the staffs of wholesalers, 
distributors, jobbers, and supply dealers 
(the nomenclature varies industry by in- 
dustry), are the least advertising minded 
of all salesmen. They're happy when de- 
mand for a product has been created by 
advertising but they're not interested in 
doing any advertising missionary work. 

"Why should we carry the ball for any 
product's advertising," asked a farm feeds 
distributor. "We're seldom consulted 
about how a manufacturer should adver- 
tise and sometimes we have to get tough 
in order to make certain that the right 
station and program is used to cover our 
territory. We're close to the farnvfeed 
dealer and we have a fairly accurate pic- 
ture of the listening habits of farmers. 
Nevertheless we find that the recommen- 
dations of some still wet-behind-the-ears 
clerk who calls himself a timebuyer is 
taken before our suggestions. I'm not 
carrying three feeds for which I have real 
demand because they insist on using a 
50,000 watt station to cover a lot of terri- 
tory instead of using local stations that 
are close to farmers." 

When asked how the "real demand" for 
those three feeds was inspired, the feed 
man stated quite frankly that the 50kw 
station had a good audience and had 
"stirred up" the farmers to demand the 
three feeds in question. 

"They haven't got them stirred up 
enough to prevent our selling 'em some- 
thing else," was the way he explained his 
continuous road-blocking of the non- 
conforming advertiser's products. 

Wholesalers are pro-selective broad- 
casting, as long as it's used intelligently. 
They are not impressed by announce- 
ment schedules, no matter how fine the 
programs that surround the announce- 
ments. They don't doubt the selling 
effectiveness of announcement advertis- 
( Please turn to page 76) 



Problems with broadcasting 

1. Wholesalers arc seldom contacted by stations or net- 
works 

2. There's no organization in radio whose job ii is i<» 
explain, promote, or merchandise the medium 

.'{. Selective broadcast advertising is too much announce- 
ment and too Hi lie program 

I. Some stations and networks expect wholesalers to sell 
air-advertising and that's not their job 

.>. Broadcast advertising requires factual sale- effective- 
ness figures instead of* razzle-dazzle 

6. Broadcasters use figures in terms of multimillions 
which don't mean a thing to salesmen who have l<> 
think in terms of hundreds of customers 



Problems with sponsors 

1. Advertising managers know very little of wholesalers' 
problems 

2. Sponsors have a great tendency to "cover the country" 
rather than individual markets 

3. Too many advertisers expect wholesalers to distribute 
point-of-sale displays and give-aways without recom- 
pense 

4. There's little coordination between manufacturers' 
sales and advertising departments 

5. Less secrecy about ad plans and more broadcast ac- 
tivity openly arrived at would help everyone 

6. Too much selling copy when the panic is on and loo 
little when business is jjood 



Problems with advertising ageneies 

1. ProduCI distribution is a Mi ml spot in most agency 
thinking 

2. There's too little pre-testing of campaigns 

3. Localizing of broadcast advertising is avoided more 
often than attempted 

1. Too many markets arc just spots on a map to timc- 
buvers and account executives 



5. The fact that it takes one type of copy to impress 
wholesale salesmen, another to impress retailers, and 
Still a third to "bring "em in to buy," is too often 
forgotten 

6. If ageno men could stop thinking of advertising a> an 
art and start thinking of it as a form of selling, things 
would start happening 

7. Agencies should pay some attention to dealer cooper- 
ative advertising and develop some form of control and 
checking which doesn't put the wholesaler in the 

middle 



3 JANUARY 1949 



27 




Farm favorites are liable to show up anywhere. Here WLS's Martha Crane (center) and Helen Joyce (right) visit a Villa Park (III.) "Pioneer Day" 

Keep it down to earth 



listening tastes of the 




farm eirele are simple anil speeifie 



The radio tastes of farm housewives 
often differ drastically from those of 
women in larger urban centers. Program 
managers who know most about these 
differences in taste, and cater to them, 
have proved consistently that they can 
gather and hold larger farm audiences. 

A women's service program designed 
forcit> listeners normally can't attract an 
equal proportion of farm women (as dis- 
tinct from rural non-farm listeners many 
of whose- interests arc nearer those of city 
people). The practical differences in 
their ways of living dictate the necessary 
variation in emphasis and subject matter. 

Rural housewives, for example, do 
much more preparation and cooking of 
food; they buy less canned and prepared 
foods, because much of what thev use is 



raised either on their own land or in the 
vicinity. Like women on farms, women 
in villages (2,500 and under) spend much 
more time in the kitchen than their urban 
counterparts. 

Fashion talk has to deal less with high 
style and more with utility clothes and 
adaptability and convertibility of gar- 
ments. Party clothes for mother and the 
teen-agers are of course an exception. 
Yet as Claire Banister of Rural Radio 
Network (Ithaca, New York) puts it, 
"these youngsters dress sharp and well, 
yet more than a few of their clothes are 
home made." These illustrations indi- 
cate the fundamental differences that 
affect specific program appeals. 

By selecting subject matter of more 
general nature and slanting it less specifi- 



28 



calh , some women's service programs can 
appeal about equally to segments of 
rural and urban listeners. Such compro- 
mise efforts, however, sacrifice the 
"beamed program'' technique in reaching 
the largest possible audience with com- 
mon tastes, interests, and problems. The 
largest such audience are farm listeners 
Bernice Currier's Homemaker's Visit 
KM \ Shenandoah. la.), for example, 
definitelj would not pull the typical city 
di alu with its home helps as it does the 
women whose lives it's specially designed 
to make easier and more pleasant. The 
same holds true for the KMA Kitchen 
Klinik conducted by Adella Shoemaker. 
What has been said about selling on other 
farm service programs applies to pro- 
grams addressed to the country house- 

SPONSOR 



wife. She's equally sensitive about being 
talked down to, and quick to repudiate 
selling talk that shows ignorance of her 
problems. The most successful farm 
women's service programs don't have one 
eye on urban listeners (even though they 
may actually gather sizeable numbers). 

In fact, the clue to popularity with 
farm women of a station's daytime pn> 
graming is generally in proportion to its 
understanding of important common 
tastes and requirements and the single 
purpose to fulfill them. 

When WRFD (Worthington, Ohio) 
started its sunrise-to-sunset operation 
only a little more than a year ago it faced 
the solution of its programing problem 
without benefit of popular network serial 
strips (WRFD is a non-network station). 

Every program on the schedule was ap- 
praised on the basis of the one question: 
"Is it of special interest to Ohio s rural 
people?" The schedule includes women's 
programs, discussion of current local 
issues, local special events, complete news 
coverage, local (Ohio) and national, to- 
gether with highly localized weather and 
farm service information. This approach 
has built audiences phenomenally. 

It is no foregone conclusion that any 
one specific pattern of rural listening 
tastes will apply to every rural area. 
Careful research alone will reveal possible 
audiences for new program ways. New 
York's Rural Radio Network (Ithaca) 
believes it has discovered a pattern of pro- 
graming that appeals to a substantial 
number of listeners. 

Since the network only got under way 
last June it's yet too early to appraise the 
success of the current eight stations in 
building and holding audiences. Their 
programing theories, however, seem to be 
working. On 5 December the network 
expanded its hours from 1 1 :30 a.m- 
9:15 p.m. to start the day at 6:00 a.m. 
On 11 December they started broad- 
casting two hours of square dance music 
until 1 1 :30 on Saturday nights. 

In place of daytime serials, listeners get 
straight readings (continued) of great 
stories and network-produced complete 
dramas. The formula appears to be suc- 
ceeding. The bigger test has come with 
RRN programs competing in morning 
hours before 11:30. 

Daytime serials are extremely popular 
with about one-fourth the nation's farm 
wives. Data from the U. S. Hooperatings 



of C. E. Hooper, Inc., reveal that some 
daytime serials are decidedly more popu- 
lar with rural than with city listeners: 

City Rural 

50,000 & over Under 2.500 

Backstage Wife 16.17 23.14 

Right to Happiness 14.52 22.85 

Lum 6* Abner 11.41 18.25 

On the other hand, Young Dr. Malone 
is favored by city listeners 10.96 to 8.78 
for rural listeners. Popularity of some 
serials is approximately equal with both 
rural and city people: 

City Rural 

50.000 & over Under 2.500 

Our Gal Sunday 13.43 13.19 

Big Sister 12.39 12.77 
Breakfast in Hollywood 

(P&G)* 10.16 10.91 
♦These figures represent net weekly audiences. 

Area preferences also affect the popu- 
larity of daytime strips as compared with 
other program types. 

Serials, for example, are more popular 
with Western farm women than religious 
programs, and almost as popular as re- 
ligious music. Dance music, far down the 
list in over-all popularity, in the West is 
more popular with farm wives than plays, 
serials and general entertainment pro- 
grams are with women in other areas. 

This means an advertiser should know 
the individual area preferences before de- 
ciding on best program buys. 

On no other program type is there such 
strong and sharply divided feeling among 
farm women as there is on daytime 
serials. There are probably no more 
faithful listeners to any other form of 
entertainment than the "regulars" who 
follow from two or three up to a dozen 
serials. 

In contrast to the group who listen 
regularly to soap operas are another 
group who vigorously dislike them — who 
name them as the program type most dis- 
liked. Attitudes of the remaining half of 
women listeners range in between these 
extremes. 

Very few stations make any effort to 
reach farm youth and younger children 
with entertainment designed for them. 
There are exceptions, such as KMA's 
(Shenandoah, la.) Uncle Warren's Kid 
Show, an audience participation stint in 
which children get a chance to sing, tell 
riddles, compete in a spelling bee and 
other contests. The'show is on Saturday 
morning in the KMA auditorium and 
youngsters drive in from as far as 100 
miles to see and take part in the fun. 
Sponsor is Coco- Wheats. 

(Please turn to page 72) 



1 . Rural commentators must know facts. Here's Dorothy Lindley (KSIB, Creston, Iowa) checking 

2. Farm school programs supplement teacher efforts. WLS's "School Time" has wide audiences 

3. Baby contests are hardy farm annuals. WFTM (Maysville, Ky.) covers one for N. Y. Store 

4. Farm participation programs are different. KMA's (Shenandoah, Iowa) it a "Penny Auction'' 





Harold Schafer, President of Gold Seal Company, peps up his three key executives before a sales meeting. Schafer covers the nation personally 





(■In** Wax is the amazing 
story of a man and his faith in advertising 



C >• Harold Schafer doesn't own 

his number one product, 
Glass Wax. He isn't even certain that 
he'll control the Glass Wax trade-name he 
has popularized. Nevertheless he's cur- 
rently spending over $2,000,000 in adver- 
tising. Over $1,000, 000 is going into 
radio (Arthur Godfrey on GBS daily and 
Meet the Missus on CBS-Pacific, Satur- 
days at 2:30 p.m.). The rest is going into 
newspapers and magazines. 

A little over 17 months ago & hakr was 
'Rally broke. What had built his 
business in the seven states* in which his 
Gold Seal Company operated a wax busi- 
ness (floor, furniture, and glass wax) 
wasn't working in big metropolitan 
centers. The personal magnetism and 
drive which had built his companj 
couldn't be spread wide enough. From 
1942 when Schafei founded his business, 
after resigning as salesman for a Bis- 
in. mk. North Dakota paint and varnish 



firm, until 1946 when Schafer employed 
Campbell-Mithun, Inc., as agency for the 
company, he had written all his own ad- 
vertising commercials and black and 
white copy. He had laid-out his printed 
advertising and bought his own time, sta- 
tion by station. He had shopped every 
area for time and printed media. I le 
admits that he was a bargain hunter but 
claims that if timebuyers had the local 
insight he developed in obtaining direct 
results from each advertising dollar, 
broadcast advertising could sing a new 
song of profit. He still feelsthat his home 
town station KFYR has the tightest hold 
on its audience of any station in the 
nation. 
Selective radio advertising as Schafei 

bought it outproduced an) Othei adver- 
tising medium. That didn't mean that he 
used it to the exclusion ol other media. 
I lis schedule in 1947. before he divided to 
invade ("Imago and big time, was 26 sta- 



tions, two trade papers, and 22 news- 
papers. And the combination sold all 
Gold Seal wax products effectively. On 
stations he bought the best spots he could 
find for his announcements and he used 
quarter-page newspaper copy to supple- 
ment his broadcast advertising. 

It worked in Schafer's seven states. It 
laid a gigantic egg in the Windy City. 
An independent firm with one product 
(Gold Seal wasn't selling anything but 
Glass Wax outside of the original terri- 
tory) is seldom in a position to force dis- 
tribution through consumer demand. It 
can't wait that long. Schafer's announce- 
ment schedule and quarter-page ads were 
bringing consumers into stores to ask for 
Glass Wax, but the stores didn't carry the 
pioduct. Wholesalers had never heard of 
Glass Wax and they weren't impressed 



II,, Gold Seal u„r business '"'" it Vorth and South 
Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Montana, Idaho, 
H yotning nnd I tah 



30 



SPONSOR 



IT'S 



NEW ..SENSATIONAL 



cly n«w product of chemnrry tram the loboratonn or th« GOLD SEAL COMPANY, 
Chicago 2, III molten of that tine qual.r> GOLD SEAL SELF-POl ISHIN& & PASTE WAX 
and CREAM FURNITURE POLISH. lo„d« or Out ... on An, Glo.» Surface Um 



GOLD SEAL 

GLASS WAX 




• Cleans 

• Polishes 

• Preserves 

The Lu.trt of 

•^Window Gloss 

y" Eye Glasses 
•/"Gloss Voses 

(^TTobleTops 
^f Mirrors 
,y Chromium 

(^fSilverwore 

«/f Windshields 



-NO COLORED FILM 

Juit apply and rub with a cloth - - 

than while still damp wipe with 

dry clean cloth. 



"ONCE YOU TRY IT YOU WILL ALWAYS BUY IT" 



WE HAVE IT 



One of the full-pa9e advertisements that broke resistance to Glass Wax in Chicago 
A typical "editorial type" Glass Wax newspaper advertisement now used 



'GLASS WAX' QUICK AND EASY 
TO BRIGHTEN DINGY WINDOWS 




'^-1-"- 

e,10 Windows That Sparkle, 
Thanks lo Your 'GLASS V VY" 






JtrW. . ".'VSBaWTteft". _ 
1 Wvttm* OKttM Si r/l 

\ N OTHIN G BETTER ANYWHERE [ 




GLASS 

WAX 




Urn UbfafJ Q.trl 



Gold Seal Wonder Cleaner 
Vr ipes Grime, Stains Away 





Z .".:„. Bedroom 1Mb sSjjrtiSS 
'.. Mini Ihorr- FerHrScTSgsS 






' Vr .- rt -~ ~ — ''"ZS^x ^TiJZ -CUSS »*t* »i'fc 
7..1~ -.: — TXT.TJ-— "^— "^"-•'•" Nwjr.Wk Uw 



Dealers Kind Their CI »SS « IX \?~~~~-a 

Hand* In Own Stores end Oflirrs i "* 







i 



GLASS WAX' co, 



»m RCP 11/ A V A PRODUCT OF THE 

GOLD SEAL COMPANY 



Cleans 30 Kinds of Dirt in 30 Seconds 



The Cold Se>J .mpim ' 1105 Hotucr C. 



Kidi Atlanta. Ceortu ' Telephone Cjenraa SI-* . 



SOLI) AT GROCERY. DRKi. HARDWARE. VARIETY AND DEPARTMENT STORES 



with a Bismarck, North Dakota firm with 
a Dun and Bradstreet credit rating of 
$2,200. They had been caught too often 
"playing ball" with a little guy only to be 
stuck with stock that didn't move. They 
hadn't "seen" the quarter-page news- 
paper ads and they hadn't heard any of 
Schafer's daytime announcements. Their 
genera] attitude was "come back and see 
us next year." 

Harold Schafer couldn't afford to wait 
until next year. Glass Wax had to be 
sold then and quickly — the bankroll 
wasn't going to stretch too far. In des- 
peration, Schafer and his advertising 
alter ego, Ray Mithtin, decided to rush 
into print with full-page ads in the news- 
papers on Glass Wax. The first ads were 
quickies, their effect was planned to break 
down resistance at the wholesale level. 
The can occupied almost one-quarter of 
the page and the product uses were given 
important display. The ads did their 
job. Wholesalers could see the ads even 
if they hadn't seen the quarter-page copy. 
They stocked Glass Wax and the fabulous 
sky-rocket history of America's number- 
one 1947-1948 product success was off. 

No one at Glass Wax or Campbell- 
Mithun was happy about the first ads. 
In fact it wasn't until an editorial-ad 
technique was developed that printed 
media copy began to keep pace with the 
impact of broadcast advertising. Since 
Glass Wax was a multiple use item, a 
pictorial news technique was ideal. A 
two line scarehead runs across the entire 
advertising page. It's localized — reading 
"New Glass Cleaner Comes to (St. 
Louis)," the name of the city being 
changed in each area. Price is given real 
display since Gold Seal has established a 
retail sale price for the product and fair- 
trade protects it where local state laws 
make this possible. 

Wholesalers are notorious as bottle- 
necks. In the case of Gold Seal which 
distributes through more types of retail 
outlets than practically any other product 
or form of product, if wholesalers won't 
stock the item Gold Seal is out of business. 
Glass Wax is sold in drug stores, grocer) 
stores, specialty stores, paint stores, de- 
partment stores, automotive supply stores, 
hardware stores, five-and-ten-cent stores, 
delicatessens, and in fact in every type of 
retail outlet that can handle a package 
goods product. 

Since selective radio alone, on a con- 
servative schedule, couldn't force distri- 
bution in spite of its effective moving of 
the product from retailers' shelves, Harold 
Schater and Ray Mithun decided to com- 
(Please turn to page 74) 



31 



SUNDAY OCTOBER 10, 1948 
X-TIME-1234567e9012345G76901234567890123456789012345676901234567890 



1-2000 


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SET NBR 


43 


WAS LISTENING 


TO 


WJZ 


- NEW YORK 















How many listen: Radox 



(Above)Radox repcrt covers 60 sets for two 15-minute periods. Top line in each time segment indicates home number and letters underneai 



How many listen - - and why ? 



Siiidliiiger may have low-cost quantitat i\ «» and qualitative systems 



1 Radox can answer most of 
- :-i the objections thus far chal- 
lenging quantitative research on the size 
of radio audiences. It can be economical. 
It is accurate. It is definitive. It is prac- 
tically as immediate as dialing itself — if 
that speed is required. It can give flow of 
audience information, and minute-by- 
minute listening figures if that's desired. 
For the individual program sponsor, 
figures on who was listening to his pro- 
gram is sufficient. That information can 
be obtained directly from the teletype 
tabulations which are made while the pro- 
gram is on the air. For station listening 
indices, the home-by-home listening re- 
port made every three minutes presents 
enormous compilation difficulties, al- 
though a tape is cut by the teletype 
monitor tabulator at the same time a^ she 
is tj ping her report on a regular page-t\pc 
teletype machine. The information on 



32 



this tape can be transferred to IBM cards, 
so that any type of information desired 
can be run off. However, Radox plans 
call for a simplified compilation of listen- 
ing data via automatic recorders which 
are being set up to gather figures on num- 
ber of homes listening to any part of each 
15-minute time segment; total homes 
listening to a station during the morning, 
afternoon, and evening of each day; total 
sets in use in any one area. The details 
will still be on teletyped reports of listen- 
ing every three minutes but the auto- 
matic recorders will make available 
specific information, without any IBM 
machine or hand tabulations. These re- 
corders reduce the delivering total figures 
to reading the face of each counter at 
correct intervals. These automatically 
compiled figures are equivalent to the 
rating information which is released regu- 
larly by Hooper, Nielsen, and Pulse. 



Each member of the panel has a dial in his hand which ena 
him to register his reaction to the program to which he's lis 
in3 — "bad," "inferior," "neutral," "good," or "super 





* 



icate station. (Right) Typical Radox listening post 



They can also be set up to deliver much 
more than rating figures, just as do the 
detailed Radox teletyped records. 

Al Sindlinger who heads up the Radox 
listening research organization feels that 
quantitative information is only the be- 
ginning of good radio research. He even 
rates his Teldox audience analyzer quali- 
tative check-up on why the audience 
listens, as only a step in the right direc- 
tion. (He does recorded depth inter- 
views to discover the real reason why a 
person states he likes or dislikes a pro- 
gram.) Nevertheless Radox, even in its 
present stage, is an important advance in 



radio research. Radox makes available 
a family directory, detailing each set in 
each home which is monitored. The 
directory gives the essential information 
on each home required by an advertiser. 
Thus when a sponsor receives a report on 
listening to his program it could be 
possible for him to discover exactly the 
type of families he is reaching. The 
directory gives economic and educational 
data on each member of the family. It 
gives magazine and newspaper readership 
habits as well as what they claim are their 
listening habits. In the latter section 
daytime and nighttime favorite programs, 
as well as favorite stations are recorded. 
It is interesting to note that the listeners' 
statement of their favorites seldom 
parallels their actual dialing habits. 
Radox makes no attempt to tabulate what 
listeners say they like, only what Radox 
eavesdropping knows they listen to. 

There can be no question as to the 
accuracy of the Radox index. Every 
home set monitored is actually in opera- 
tion as reported. The Radox method is 
simplicity itself, although development 
costs have already run over $160,000. By 
a simple piece of equipment costing $1 .95, 
which is installed in the receiver being 
checked, it is possible for a special central 
office to listen-in as frequently as desired 
by a telephone line connection. The mon- 
itor listens in via another earphone over 
one ear. When a set is heard to be in use, 
the monitor, through an earphone over 
his second ear, listens-in directly to one 
station after another in the area being 
checked until he finds the program to 
which the set in the home is tuned. When 
both earphones bring him the same pro- 
gram he knows and records the station to 
which the home set is dialed. When two 



stations in an area are carrying the same 
program, as happens in many sections of 
the countrj served bj multiple stations 
carrying the programs of the same net- 
work, it has been found that the stations 
are seldom in phase with each other 
Only the station to which the home is 
tuned will sound exactly the same from 
the central-office monitoring radio re- 
ceivers as it does from the home. Other 
stations will sound as though one ear was 
echoing what the other ear was hearing. 
The monitor never trusts to memory, 
logs, or other information of what's on the 
air. She verifies with her ears the station 
to which each home in her listening panel 
is tuned. Only a Nielsen Audimeter re- 
cords this type of information. 

Commander Harold R. Reiss, who is 
Sindlinger 's electronic "brains," has de- 
veloped an automatic monitoring system 
♦■hat will enable the work presently being 
done through manual monitoring to be 
done by electronics. As with all engineer- 
ing development time tables, it is not too 
definite when electronics will take over 
from manual operations. However, one 
thing is certain — large scale expansion 
beyond Philadelphia, where the Radox 
tests are being conducted depends a great 
deal on Reiss's electronic monitoring get- 
ting out of the laboratory and into regular 
daily operation. 

Radox's experimental sample in Phila- 
delphia covers 38 homes which have 54 
radio receivers and six television sets. 
Philadelphia will be sampled completely 
through monitoring a panel of 300 homes. 
Sindlinger promises that Radox installa- 
tions in these homes will be completed 
sometime during this Spring. Monitoring 
for this regular coverage of Philadelphia 
(Please turn to page 70) 



Teldox "profile" indicating just how a listening panel reacts. Below is report on a radio program. Program content at top of chart 



Why they listen: Teldox 



!■ 




selective 
radio 
trends 



Based upon the number of programs and an- 
nouncement: placed by sponsors with stations 
and indexed by Rorabaugh Report on Sel- 
ective Radio Advertising. Reports for August 
'47-July '48 are averaged as a base of 100 



Business uncertainty prevented the expected November upsurge in 
selective broadcast advertising. National index dropped to level of last 
August with only Drugs and Tobacco holding their own. Beverages and 
Confectionery recaptured some of October's loss ( 1 1 points l. It was felt 
that right after election selective broadcast advertising, usually one of 
the first forms of advertising to respond to change in business condi- 
tions, would see the start of a number of campaigns which were being 
held in abeyance. Now the explanation for the slow upturn in selective 
advertising placement is "Truman's attitude," and what it's going to 
be. Regionally all areas except Pacific and Rocky Mountain were off 
with the South showing the greatest loss. Even the West Coast was 
only up 1 point. Claim that TV is taking many selective radio dollars 
is generally held thus far to be invalid. 



Per cent 



250 — 
200 — 
150 — 
100 — 
50 — 



AUG SEP ! OCT NOV DEC JAN | FEB I MAR I APR I MAY I JUN JUL 



Based upon reports from 230 * Sponsors 




Trends by Geographical Areas 1948-1949 



AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL 



250-1 2,531,498 Radio families 
200 





1947**948 



Aug. '47-July '48 average = 100.0% 



250 ■ 

!00 - 
ISO 
100 - 

50 



Trends by Industry Classifications 1948-1949 

76 Sponsors reporting 



AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL 



DDDa 



S50 ■ 5 Sponsors reporting 
too 



Sponsors reporting 






mm. 

'47-'48 average = 100.0% 



Automotive 

* ■ •- ■■ 



Tobaeco 

:;/■;■;■■■■ . 



Drugs 



lia 



iscellane 



•For this total a sponsor it regarded a> a tingle 
be reported under a number of classifications. 



36 



corporate entity no matter how many diverse divisions it may include. In the industry reports, however, the same sponsor may 



SPONSOR 



In next issue: TV Trend** 






sails into new markets fast 



In the highly competitive soap 
business, it takes fast, powerful selling 
to launch new products with a 
flying start. So it's natural that Lever 
Brothers uses plenty of Spot Radio to 
introduce its new detergent, BREEZE. 

Starting with the nation's hard-water areas, 
BREEZE has expanded market by market, 
using Spot Radio to hammer home powerful sales 
messages. Spot Radio starts working for Lever 
Brothers well before announcements are 
aired . . . through pre-campaign merchandising 
of schedules that insures aggressive market-wide 
retail support. Dealers know this potent 
medium will bring in customers, and they prepare 
to welcome them with stocks, displays and 
promotions. As a result. Lever Brothers 
attains profitable volume fast . . . 
and then maintains it with continuing 
BREEZE Spot Radio campaigns. 

Whether you have a new product to establish, 
or an old one that needs new sales, Spot 
Radio can do the job. Find out about this 
powerful, flexible medium — how it 
works and how to work it — from your 
John Blair man. He knows! 



with 

SPOT 



RADIO! 





JOHN 
BLAIR 




t COMPANY 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES I : LEADING 
RADIO AND TELEVISION STATIONS 



BREEZE advertising is handled 
by Federal Advertising Agency, 
New York, New York 



'Spot Broadcasting is radio advertising 
of any type ( from brief announcements to 
full-hour programs) planned and placed on 
a flexible market-by-market basis. 



Offices in Chicago • New York • Detroit • St. Louis • Los Angeles • San Francisco 



3 JANUARY 1949 



37 



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record ol major sales successes unoroken l>y a single taiuire. 














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weight with 






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prospective program purchasers ... it supported by tac 


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vve have in abundance . . . high Hoopers, congratulatory 






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popularity and pull, the show is reasonably priced. 


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38 



SPONSOR 



FURS 



SPONSOR: Lowell and Bradfield 



U.I \< 1 : Placed direct 



CAPSUL1 CAS1 ii I- I mo : Merrill Lowell, Beverly Hills 

furrier, sponsored the "II omen's I'age" segment of 
" Magazine of the If ieeA:," heard Sundays at 8: 10 p.m. 
This segment of the program is a fashion show conducted 
by Rita LaRoy. I 'arious hinds of furs are shown, and the 
fashion theme is accentuated by the showing of coordinating 
accessories and general teamen's near with the emphasis 
on furs. Is a result of his first six telecasts. Lowell and 
Bradfield did $15,000 north of business. 

KM \. I .... Angeles PROGRAM: "Magazine of the Week" 



RADIOS 



SPONSOR: Emerson Radio 



AGENCY: Wm. H. Weintraul. 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: To bolster radio set sales. 
Emerson offered a $30 gift certificate on 14 November to 
all "Toast of the Town" viewers in the areas covered by the 
CBS-TV network. Certificate ims honored at face value 
toward a $60 radio (Model 574) by all Emerson radio 
dealers. To obtain the certificate, viewers had to write 
Emerson Radws home office. Although the offer was only 
good until midnight. Tuesday, 16 November, over 9.000 
requests were received by that time. 

CBS-TV PROGRAM: "Toast of the Town" 



MACpAZIXES 



TV 

results 



SPONSOR: Television Guide 



AGENCY: Placed direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Television Guide decided II 
was the natural medium to increase the circulation of their 
magazine. I year's subscription to the magazine plus a 
small-sized Walco TV lens (magnifier) were offered for 
$3.00. Viewers were asked to send their money directly to 
the magazine. Three one-minute announcements were 
used, one on each of the days of 11-13-14 November. 
Fifteen hundred letters enclosing the price of the subscrip- 
tions were received. 



WPIX, New York 



N<<M.U \M: I -minute announcements 



FURNITURE 


RADIO AND TV SETS 


SPONSOR: Lewis S. Hart Gallery \GENCY: Placed direct 

< VPSULE CASE HISTORY; On Tuesday. 9 November, 
KTL 1 televised its first auction from the Lewis S. Hart 
Gallery in Beverly Hills. One person, viewing telecast 

from home, icent to the auction that same night and bought 

over $200 north of furniture. The following evening, a 

surrev of auction attendance revealed that over 35 persons 
at/ended r/.s a result of viewing the precious night's telecast. 
They -pent nearly $1,000. The next evening 28 more 
people u ho had seen the telecast visited the gallery. 

Ml \. Loa Angeles PROGRAM: Auction 


SPONSOR: RCA Victor U.l MY: J. Walter Thompson 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: " Kitkla. Iran and Ollie." 
II 11 Kit's whimsical puppet show is wowing juveniles in 
Chicago from the ages of 3 to 50. as evidenced by the 350 
fan letters sent in each week by viewers. Stars of the show 
are Kukla. bald and bulb-nosed puppet, attractive Fran 
Allison, and one-toothed puppet dragon named Ollie. 
Since show's lilliputian newspaper, " Kuklapolitan 
Courier,"' was launched in October over 7.000 requests for 
subscriptions have been received. 
\\ BKB, Chicago PROGB \M: 'Kukla, Iran and Ollie" 


4 OOKI.M. M IIOOL 


RODEO 


SPONSOR None u.l \< 1 : None 

I IPSUL1 I \-i HISTORY: Dione Lucas, directoi oj 
Cordon Bleu's Cooking School, conducts ///<■ Dione Lucas 
television program over < l'>^ 1 I net every Thursday from 
H 8:30 p.m. Program features cooking demonstrations. 
On Thursday, /<>' Wovember, advance copies of the recipes 
to be demonstrated on ih<- Thanksgiving l>a\ telecast acre 
offered to all writing in. Recipes were l<>i an ice (ream 
mold, oatmeal cookies, anil chestnut i ookies. 1 he first mail 
on the following Mon<la\ aftei the telecast, 22 November, 
brought 2,040 requests. 

CBS-1 \ PROGR \M: Dione Lucas 


SPONSOR: Sainlpaulites Inc. \GENCY: Placed direct 

( VPSI II ( \SI HISTORY: The llorld's C.humpionship 
Rodeo was held in St. Paul, Minnesota recently. On open- 
ing night. Friday. KSTP televised an innovation called the 
"calf scramble." This event was repeated the following 

Monday, and paid admissions acre 10' '", over expectations. 
indicating that the public had been familiarized with the 

special feature via television. Weaker t. 1 an (amp. Man- 
aging Director of the Saintpaulites, has stated he will tele- 
vise all future events where the run is long enough to make 
television a factor in building grosses. 

KSTP, St Paul PROGR \M: "World's Championship Rodeo" 



In the New York Market 



television pays off 

" WATV 




S.o.i.n WATV 



averages 



402 



viewers per dollar 




Station A averages ZoC 



viewers per dollar 




SIW ^ V 





Station b averages Z I Z 

viewers per dollar 






Stat 



ion V_ 



averages I O Z 

viewers per dollar 






Station U averages 10/ 

viewers per dollar 



itation L 



N A T I 




averages 7 7 

viewers per dollar 



or the second consecutive month — October, 1948 — 
Hooper New York City Teleratings show that Station 
WATV averages more viewers per dollar than any 
other television station in the New York Metropolitan Area. 



Here are two of WATV's high-rated, low-budgeted evening 



programsr 



WESTERN FEATURE — 7:00-8:00 P.M. 




(oil per 1000 ViewfM pn-Dolloi 



WATV 10.3 



FEATURE FILM — 8:00-9:00 P.M. 



Rating Coil cer 1000 Viewer! per-Dollar 



WATV programs now average more than 100,000 
viewers per half hour. This large ready-made audi- 
ence — delivered to you at WATV's sensibly scaled rates 
— means more for your television dollar. 

Let television pay off for you now. Call — wire — write 
Station WATV, Televisior Center, Newark 1, New Jersey 
for details of our special "Low Budget Television Shows". 

SOURCE: C. E. Hooper, Inc., New York City Teleratings — October 
8-14, 1948. The above figures are based on those time, periods 
rated by Hooper, during which all New York City Television Stations 
were on the air with programming. "Cost-Per-Thousand" and 
"Viewer-Per-Dollar" figures were computed from minimum half-hour 
time charges for each station. 



T I V E S 



WEED 



COMPANY 



3 JANUARY 1949 



41 




11 



II /O 



WHAS &. 









KENTUCKIANA'S 

IROQUOIS AMPHITHEATRE 

The World's Most Beautiful Outdoor Theatre 



A CIVIC, NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION 




OtiA, 




the only radio station S£RI///V(r fa\\ of the 




BACKGROUND 
LATE SPRING '48 




THE WHAS ANSWER! 



Broadway legit box office had sagged badly . . . Road show business 
was also off . . . everywhere movie house grosses were fading. 

It was a gloomy prospect for Kentuckiana's Iroquois Amphitheatre. 
Coming up was the 10th anniversary season of summer outdoor 
musical shows staged by this civic, non-profit organization of 
Louisville. Rising production costs demanded greater attendance- 
yet the theatre was in a slump. 



WHAS stepped in to provide the answer. The Amphitheatre's 
promotional campaign was overhauled to give it more popular appeal. 
The ticket-selling story was woven into an entertaining musical 
broadcast with star vocalists, actors, chorus and studio orchestra. 
WHAS sold 25 Louisville firms on sharing the cost with the station. 
And for six weeks, "Music Under The Stars" took to the air- 
telling Louisville and Kentuckiana listeners of the Amphitheatre's 
summer attractions. 




THE 
RESULT! 



Text of letter to Victor A. Sho/is, Director, WHAS, from 

James W. Henning, President, Louisville Park Theatrical Association: 

"Our books have just been closed on our 1948 summer season. The 
results are extremely cheering to all of us on the board of the 
Iroquois Amphitheatre. 

"Theatre box office receipts in general were down this summer. 
In the face of this prevailing situation, the paid attendance and 
receipts from ticket sales at the Amphitheatre this summer 
surpassed those of 1947. 

"Much of this success must be credited to the new star salesman we 
had on our side this year — Station WHAS. It was a great job your 
staff did in producing this series of elaborate musical broadcasts. 
But it was an even greater job the WHAS programs did in promoting 
more business for our box office. 

"Please convey our sincere thanks to everyone at the station." 



ich Kentuckiana Market 




50,000 WATTS * 1 -A CLEAR CHANNEL 



840 KILOCYCLES 



Victor A. Sholis, Director J. Mac Wynn, Sales Director 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY EDWARD PETRY AND COM PA NY 




Mr. Sponsor asks... 



"The 'block programing' formula has had rela- 
tively pood success in radio, but I don't believe 
it applies to television programing on the basis 
of good showmanship. Is it therefore advisable 
for a TV advertiser to have his program, for ex- 
ample a comedy show, follow another show of 
similar mood and type?" 



Donald W. Stewart 



Advertising Manager 
The Texas Co., N. Y. 




The 

l*i<*k<Ml Panel 
answers 
>lr. M«'\v;irl 

I should like to 
answer the ques- 
tion from the point 
of view of motion 
picture program- 
ing in theaters 
which is perhaps 
more analogous 
than from radio. 
Too, there is a 
growing feeling in 
television that the basic lessons of film 
programing will govern in TV. 

There is a school of thought in motion 
picture theater booking that believes 
shows of opposite or different moods 
should appear side by side; a dramatic 
show with a comedy; a musical with a 
mystery, etc. There is a wealth of ex- 
perience to show the success of such a 
theory. On the other hand, some of the 
most successful combinations in the his- 
tory of the motion picture industry were 
the result of booking shows of similar 
mood and type. The "horror," "mys- 
tery" and "crime" bookings are examples 
of this pra< tice. 

Motion pi< ture experience on this point 
has demonstrated over the years that 
there is no pat formula. In fact, con- 
siderable danger lies in a categorical repl) 
to the question. The moment you think 
you have a definite answer, you are sure 
to have an experience that proves the 
opposite. 

If such a reply could confidently be 



given, it might be reassuring to the TV 
advertiser; however, he must, I am afraid, 
be satisfied to put on a good show that can 
stand on its own feet. The nature and 
mood of the adjacent show would then be 
of academic interest and the effort and 
energy expended in arguing the point 
might well be devoted to more basic 
ingredients which deliver audiences. 

Perhaps there should be some experi- 
mentation on this score. Two dramatic 
shows following each other on a Sunday 
night might very well prove highly suc- 
cessful. Who can say? 

In motion picture theater booking al- 
most anything can happen; some of the 
most unpromising combinations often 
prove in fact to be outstanding hits. We 
have learned our lesson; now we pre-test 
them first. We take nothing for granted. 
Peter G. Levathes 
Director of Television 
20th Century-Fox, New York 



It does not nec- 
essarily follow that 
what holds true 
and is proven in 
radio applies to 
the tenuous ex- 
periments of the 
video medium. 
You can block- 
program music, as 
we have done here 
at WNEW, with great success. But ear- 
pleasure is not parallel to eye-fatigue. 
There's a long road to follow before the 
answer is reached. It is regrettable that 
the cost in finding this out comes high. 
But sooner or later the experiment must 
be made. 

I rather suspect that block-programing 
in television will not prove as salutary as 




it does in radio. The best source of ex- 
perience to draw on is the double feature 
of the movies. It is my recollection that 
there is usually a diversity of types in this 
kind of parlay. This could be ascribed to 
the economic cost of putting two Grade A 
movies back-to-back. I hate to beg a 
question, but television can't take a 
piggy-back ride on radio this trip. 
Ted Cott 

Vp in charge of Programs 
WNEW, New York 



It's a shame in 
TV that the an- 
swer to this type 
of question, so 
vital to advertisers 
and agencies, is 
left to discussion 
and debate when 
facilities are avail- 
able through sta- 
tions to determine 
audience preference of "mood" program- 
ing through actual experience. The 
whole industry profits by knowing viewer 
tuning habits and it is not too soon for 
stations and networks to determine see- 
ing-hearing attitudes vs. purely aural 
preferences. 

But as in radio the discovery of this 
kind of audience preference is being left to 
accident. This was the manner in which 
block programing was "discovered" while 
I was at WNEW. Why and how a sta- 
tion holds its audience over a period of 
several hours was analyzed only after a 
phenomenal radio rating was sustained at 
the station for months on end. 

Television stations, profiting from 
radio's experience, should block program 
experimentally to determine audience 
attitude and not leave so vital a question 




44 



SPONSOR 



to debate and discussion. 

Early television experiences of WRGB 
offer to a limited degree a definite answer. 
A viewer-survey made while I was at the 
Schenectady station, determined that 
viewers, who had been seeing television 
for a number of years, wanted hour-long 
or longer programs. This panel of 
viewers (over 50% of those owning sets in 
the area and representing various eco- 
nomic levels) planned their viewing 
evenings and wanted to be assured of 
several hours of entertainment. This 
held true for juvenile viewing as well as 
for "informative" programing. 

It is my opinion that if block program- 
ing is scheduled without a break, it may 
be more than the audience can take and 
they may start shopping for other enter- 
tainment. However, if the viewing audi- 
ence is given a ten-minute break — an 
intermission as in the theatre, between 
programs, a seventh inning stretch — 
block programing can be the answer to 
building and holding audiences. 

Judy Dupuy 

President 

Video Events, New York 

It is entirely 
possible for a TV 
advertiser to have 
his television show 
follow another of 
"similar type" and 
still draw top 
audiences — pro- 
vided there is a 
recognizable 
change of theatri- 
cal mood between the two. 

That may sound contradictory, but it 
really isn't. For example, let's suppose 
that a TV advertiser who is sponsoring a 
dramatic show finds a good time period 
available following another dramatic 
show. Suppose, too, that both shows are 
roughly similar as to format, appeal, star 
policy, etc. Now, would the advertiser in 
question lose anything by following a 
show that is basically similar to his? 
Would the audience grow tired of seeing 
"too much of the same thing?" 
I think not. 

The answer lies in one of the funda- 
mental rules of good theater. When a 
"curtain raiser" is presented with another 
and longer play, or when two plays are 
presented in the same evening, producers 
have found that they get the most favor- 
able audience reaction by achieving a 
change of pace — by following comedy 
with tragedy, or vice versa. The form of 
( Please turn to page 46^ 



IBvar Ji>v: 




In reviewing our activit\ ol the past few 
months at WMIE-Miami, it is evident that 
in our intense effort in our local South 
Florida market we have been guilty oi 
neglect in supplying you with proper in- 
formation. We intend to correct this over- 
sight by means of monthly letters, and 
because we think we may find advertising 
people with an interest in development of a 
rather unusual independent station in a 
competitive market, we have decided to 
print out tetters as monthly advertisements 
in sponsor. 

W< want to bring this out right in the 

beginning, because, though we've had the 
magazine set up our letter in reading type, 
i In- htt.r and those which will follow are 
definite attempts to acquaint folks who have 
the responsibility of allocating broadcast 
budgets with WMIE-Miami, its personnel 
and its progress. 

One more point, Joe. This is frankly an 
experiment. This type of presentation may 
not prove to be nearly as interesting to ad- 
vertising folks up North as it is to us locally, 
and if this seems to be the case, we'll change 
our plan to one of more conventional type 
We'll need suggestions from you, and if you 
can pick a word or two of advice from the 
trade, we'll appreciate that, too. 

The story of WMIE-Miami is an interest- 
ing one, we think, but we haven't tried to 
tell it before, because we just couldn't de- 
cide how best to do it. Frankly, we can't 
see how the average broadcasting station 
trade paper ad can be too interesting, or of 
much value to time-buyers. There are 
some very notable exceptions, of course, but 
the usual ad just doesn't say much in the 
way of tangible evi- 
dence of a station's 
worth. Some ad- 
vertising stations 
are so well known, 
though, that re- 
L^P j^, ^B minder copy is 




■■I 



probably all that is 
necessary . . . rather 
like the difference 
between announce- 
ments broadcast 
effectively for well 
established prod- 
klinger ucts.andgi odselling 

copy plus a good air 

salesman to properly promote products less 

thoroughly established. 

We have a local success story we like to 
tell about WMIE-Miami that demonstrates 
this effectively. There's a small, compara- 
tively new men's stoic in Miami, not too 
favorably located, which had become con- 
vinced that radio broadcasting just wouldn't 
produce for its business. The store. Peter 
Kent, had used an ambitious schedule of an- 
nouncements on a network outlet here, and 
to put it in president Sam [Ginger's words, 
"nothing happened." 

Our salesman. Dave O'Shea, convinced 
him that it was just the type radio that was 
wrong in his case, not the medium, with the 
result that he bought a reconstructed 




SHEETZ 



ADVERTISEMENT 



American League ball game on WMIE as a 
one time test We had Bill Sheet/, do 
commercials as well as the game, and as- 
signed Art ( ireen to do other sales chores. 
too. Green, as you 
know, was one of 
New York's leading 
air merchandisers. 
To us, the results 
were most gratify- 
ing, but to the 
client, they were 
phenomenal. The 
game was played at 
night and the next 
morning found 
fourteen or fifteen 
customers waiting 
forthedoorstoopen. 
Sheetz and O'Shea 
took a photographer down at about 10:30 
AM. found the sales clerks unable to wait on 
the trade and both were pressed into service 
themselves. By 2 :3T or 3 :00 that afternoon. 
Peter Kent was sold out of a healthy stock 
of advertised items (jackets, suits and sports 
shirts), and had moved a large volume in 
non-advertised items. 

Now, though we risk making a good story 
sound incredible, the Peter Kent report 
doesn't end here. The store is owned and 
operated by two aggressive fellows who 
couldn't wait for shipment from ordinary 
supply sources. Within two days, they 
bought up the stock of a less successful 
men's store (non-WMIE advertiser. Joe) 
moved it to their own shelves, bought a few 
more American League games including two 
games broadcast at once on a Sunday after- 
noon, and listen Joe — they sold out again! 

We're sending you a signed statement 
from the Peter Kent folks, Joe, because we 
think Forjoe & Company may wish to show 
it to a few people with an interest in spot 
coverage. However, this story isn't pri- 
marily a testimonial to the effect of WMIE- 
Miami. It proves, instead, that broadcast 
advertising, bought carefully, will pay off 
like no other medium can. Of course, we 
have an obvious advantage at WMIE 
Miami in that we have found it necessary to 
provide ourselves with the same type pro- 
fessional folks as networks have on hand in 
New York, Hollywoi d, etc When working 
i< a an advertiser on local or spot campai 
we are thus able to emulate the -ervice 
rendered to network clients by network 
offices. This type of operation is expensive, 
but then we can afford it. because we retain 
so much greater a proportion of each dollar 
spent with us than do network affiliates of 
network revenue. 

Hope this will prove of interest to you. 
Joe Drop us a line of suggestion at your 
convenience 

Cordially. 

P.S. Should add that Peter Kent now spon- 
sors Bill Sheetz' nightly sports review at 
6:30 I'M on WMIE-Miami. 



3 JANUARY 1949 



45 



entertainment is the same (they're both 
plays) but the "mood" has been modified 
until it is in counterpoint with the play 
that preceded it. To give an example of 
that, let's look at The Telephone and The 
Medium, or the Old Vic's Critic and 
Oedipus. 

In television, it would necessitate the 
producers of both shows getting together 
in some manner and scheduling the 
dramatic works they are going to present 
so that comedy will not follow comedy, 
but will be counterpointed by heavy 
drama or melodrama. This will avoid the 



problem of one producer trying to top 
another's show. 

This can not, of course, be carried out 
indefinitely throughout an evening. There 
is a much higher fatigue factor in tele- 
vision than in radio, where "block pro- 
graming" has had its biggest success. But 
within the reasonable limit of two or per- 
haps three shows back-to-back it should 
work successfully in attracting and hold- 
ing a television audience. 

Armina Marshall 

Executive Producer 

The Theatre Guild, New York 




CONFUSION PLUS 

(Continued from page 35) 

interstate application. 

This applies as well to the state cen- 
sorship of movies. Today, seven states 
have state censorship boards, and at 
least 80 cities maintain local boards. 
Their jurisdiction lies in the showing, not 
the transportation of films. Since all 
concerned with the showing of sponsored 
TV program films today have gone to 
great lengths to see that the films are 
"suitable to be shown in the living room 
of American homes" the problem is not 
likely to arise. However, advertisers and 
broadcasters alike will have to keep in 
mind the regulations of the National 
Board of Review, as well as local regula- 
tions that are often more stringent. 
Otherwise, the local censor may have a 
legitimate complaint, since reception of 
TV programs on home sets is considered 
by most legal authorities to be a "public 
exhibition." 

One of the factors which complicates 
the showing of TV films is that they are 
seldom reviewed by telecasters in ad- 
vance, and are shown "cold" to viewers. 
This sometimes produces odd results. 
Some years ago, KTLA telecast a film 
about good posture. It was an interest' 
ing short-subject film, approved by the 
American Medical Association. One of 
the scenes showed a young lady in a 
nightgown climbing into bed. Several 
viewers, who had tuned in late, caught 
the scene without any explanatory pro- 
logue and promptly called the TV station, 
newspapers, etc., etc., to complain about 
the "bedroom scene" their kiddies had 
been exposed to. Everything was settled 
peacefully, but not until there had been a 
few nervous moments on the part of the 
station management. This example well 
serves as a lesson to sponsors of TV films 
who may be including material in their 
programs which can be partially mis- 
interpreted. 

Any other question of "good taste" 
in TV programing, whether in programs 
or announcements, live or film, network or 
local should be decided basically by 
Section 326 of the FCC regulations. 
This ruling states: "No person shall utter 
any obscene, indecent, or profane lan- 
guage by radio communications." Broad- 
t.isters have accepted the word "radio" 
as applying to TV as well. 

Apart from the legal problems that 
arise out of the actual transmission of 
TV scannings, there are many behind-' 
tin scenes pitfalls for the advertiser in 
the preparation of TV programs. The 
l Please turn to page 50) 



46 



SPONSOR 



Centra New England, 

u I, the nation's strongest 

sh ° n ! .ImoI radio sets, 
concentration ot 

MMTLVto WTAG 

^^^^^^^ ■ ~ Measurement 

,„dexes and Benson & Be- $ rf nt 

a , provide conclusive proof Massach 

?adfo audience in Central Ne* , * ^^ wlth 
1 (the central port.on ot W rsh ip - 

ah ead of every state'he " ^ 

of ,he Northeast and ^ ^ 

Benson & Benson s D.ary J^ condense d 

a 54 surrounding ct.es ^ large , t 

here to quarter ^JJ^. On news periods 

-err^-narea. 

WhenYo«B«vr»me»nNewln9»and, 



55 



10 



^ 



& 



to 



xr 



60 65 

I LI I I N 



71 



M 

IS8 1 



v 



<*> 



<* 10 



voi 



7 



Ml 
& 



to 



mil 



m 



'la 



All OTHERS 



WTAG 



Quarter Hours 



Quarter Hours 

In the MORNING, 
WTAG is first in 
Audience 143 quarter- 
hours out of 162, or 
88 % of the total time. 



Quarter Hours 



Quarter Houi 



irter Hours 



Quarter Hours Quarter Hours Quarter Hours 



In the AFTERNOON, 
WTAG is first in 
Audience I 19 quarter- 
hours out of 168, or 
71 ° of the total time. 



In the EVENING, 
WTAG is first in 
Audience 141 quarter- 
hours out of 168, or 
84 °o of the total time. 



WORCESTER 

580 KC 5000 Watts 



PAUL H. RAYMER CO. National Sales Representatives. 
affiliated with the Worcester Telegram — Gazette. 



For the ENTIRE WEEK, 
WTAG leads in Audi- 
ence 403 quarter- 
hours out of 498, or 
of the total time. 



f SA S/Ck 



!».r 



LBS. 



Br 



iJv 



3 JANUARY 1949 



47 




HO STANDS OUT 



v 



■fa 



i 



I 



FH0HT OF YOUR STC 




in 



The patient, painted cigar-store Indian did a good job 
of bringing the people in, of distinguishing one store 
from all others. .. until everybody had a wooden 
Indian. Then somebody had to create some new 
characters to attract the customers. 

It's like that in radio today. Everybody knows the 
job radio can do in calling the customers in. But 
who stands out "in front of your store" is still very 
important. It's got to be the right show. 

That's why so many of the country's biggest and 
smartest advertisers are turning to CBS Package 



Programs. They've found it pays to have shows like 
Suspense, My Friend Irma, or Arthur Godfrey out 
there in front. 

There are 21 sponsored CBS Package Shows on the 
air today— the largest operation of its kind in all radio. 
But it doesn't stop there. Right now, in work or on the 
air, are other shows, ranging the whole field of pro- 
gramming. Among them, very likely, is the show to 
stand in front of your store, and call the customers in. 
(For instance, have you heard Life with 
Luigi? Or My Favorite Husband ',?) 










CONFUSION PLUS 

{Continued from page 46) 

biggest headache here is in the question 
of TV performing rights. 

These rights break down in several 
important categories: 

(1) Dramatic and dramatico-musical 
works (such as plays, operettas, grand 
opera). 

(2) Musical compositions performed in 
a nondramatic fashion (single numbers, 
solos, background music for live and 
film programs, etc. — everything from 
Beethoven to blues.) 

(3) Nondramatic literary works (novels, 



short stories, etc.) that have to be 
adapted for the visual medium. 

Most of the important works in these 
fields are covered by one form or another 
of the copyright law, either under statu- 
tory copyright or under common-law 
copyright. Even material that is believed 
to be in the public domain must be ex- 
amined, as frequently a TV performance 
can be done only with the permission of 
those who control the TV rights (example: 
a copyrighted musical arrangement of 
some old public domain tune, like Swanee 
River). 

Not always is the right to perform a 
dramatic work, or scan a film, a clear-cut 



IS TMAT-UN 
T«E BlGCEST 

YOU COT?" 




A orch painl <>r pianos, iliv l{<<l 
River Vallej hayseed buys \»iili a 
lavish hand because /»■ makes big 
dou fill . 

The Effective Buying Income of tin - 
average North Dakota familj in tin- 
Vallej i- %5S99\ Sales Management, 
1948. I hat's higher than the average 
<>( uii\ sinir in the Nation well ;tl><>\«' 
i Ik (4975 for tin- «li«d<- of North 
I ».ik«.ia. 

\\ DAI "- 26-year hold on our Rural 
Rich is one of 1 1 ■ « - amazing stories <>f 
the Nation. \\rii< u^ <>r Free t\ 
Peters for I li<- facts ! 



FARGO, N. D. 

NBC • 970 KILOCYCLES 
5000 WATTS 




™iii- 



Free & Pfters, hc 




thing. Until a few years ago, nobody 
cared very much about writing a clause 
covering TV rights into contracts. There 
was little reason to do so. But today, 
with program producers scrambling 
around for material, there is often a 
merry-go-round between writers, rep- 
resentatives, agents, producers, actors, 
union, etc., to get clearance on rights 
before an advertiser can feel safe in 
giving a TV performance. It is a tedious 
but a iH(.css;ir\ ta^k. The advertiser who 
merely takes somebody's word that he 
has the performing rights for TV is 
taking a big chance. It makes no differ- 
ence if the person dealt with sincerely 
believes he actually is the sole holder of 
such rights. 

Such a case occurred recently when 
Philco premiered The Philco Television 
Playhouse on NBC-TV. In clearing the 
rights to perform George S. Kaufman's 
and Edna Ferber's Dinner at Eight, 
Kaufman assured NBC and Philco that 
he had all the TV rights. He even had a 
contract to prove it. Philco went ahead 
with plans to telecast the play on a live 
basis on NBC's Eastern TV Network. 
Other stations were to carry the show via 
film recordings where there was no net- 
work service. When the arrangements 
with Kaufman were made, Philco felt 
that it was all set for the premiere. 

A few hours before the telecast, a call 
came in from Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 
who had made a memorable film of the 
play years ago. It seemed that Metro had 
a contract with Kaufman for the film 
which stated somewhere in the fine print 
that any subsequent use of Dinner at 
Eight on film could only be done with 
Metro's approval. Metro's approval, 
added Metro, would cost $750.00. Kauf- 
man's rights covered television, but only 
live television. 

Philco and NBC were staring a prece- 
dent squarely in the face. If film record- 
ing, which the TV industry carefully 
avoids calling "motion pictures " were to 
be considered sound movies, any number 
of similar situations might develop. Some 
of them might even call for retroactive 
payments, and possibly increased union 
scales if the word got around. Philco and 
NBC", despite the fact that they were 
anxious to get wider coverage for the 
premiere oi the new Philco show, decided 
the whole thing was as risky as a home- 
made stepladder. The show went on the 
air live only. When Philco uses film 
i i.iiim i iptionv hi rcaftei . the\ v\ ill i heck 
with anj motion picture company in- 
volved 

Siikc then is no organization which 
Please turn to page 55) 



50 



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Radio Service of the Dallas Morning News 



By Order of FCC. WFAA Shares Time 



3 JANUARY 1949 



loth Frequenciei 



51 



Contests 



Oilers 



a siM>\s«m monthly tabulation 



SPONSOR PRODUCT PROGRAM TIME OFFER TERMS OUTLET 




ARMOUR & CO 


Chiffon 
Flakes 


Hint Hunt 


MTWTF 
4 4:25 pm 


Various merchandise prizes awarded 
daily 


Send favorite household hint and Chiffon box- 
top to program, Chi. If hint used on air, prizes 
awarded 


CBS 




CARTER PRODUCTS, INC 


Arrid 


Jimmy Fidler 


Sunday 

10:30-10:45 pm 


Total $50,000 in prizes. (1) Grand 
Prize of Celotex Cemesto home, lot, 
$2,000 electric kitchen, mink coat, 
jeweli y etc. (2) Weekly Prizes of 
$2,800 in merchandise 


Listeners must identify "Mystery Star." write 
10-word slogan for National Kid's Day Founda- 
tion. Send with/without contribution to con- 
test, Hollywood 


ABC 


CONTINENTAL BAKING CO 


Wonder Bread 
Cake 


Grand Slam 


MTWTF 
11:30-1 1:45 am 


Various merchandise prizes; also 

chance at the Grand Slam Bonus of 

special merchandise prizes 


Send list of 5 musical questions to program, 

N. Y. Entry must have correct product names 

written at top 


CBS 


EVERSHARP. INC 
P LORILLARO CO 
SMITH BROS CO 
SPEIDEL CORP 


Pens, raaors 
Old Gold Cigs. 
Coiijrh drops 
Watch bands 


Stop the 
Music 


Sunday 

8-9 pm 

(15 min ea.) 


$18,000 (minimum $1,000) in various 
cash, merchandise prizes 


Listeners called, must identify tone played plus 
"Mystery Melody" 


ABC 


GOLDBIATT BROTHERS 


Department 

store 


Let's Have 
Fun 


MTWTF 
12-12:30 pm 


Merchandise prizes, valued at several 
thousand dollars, from sponsor's store 


Listeners called, identify "Cinderella" from 
clue* in radio jingle 


WGN, 
Chi. 


GUNN GROCERY CO 


Various 


Gunn's 

Telephone 

Quiz 


9:45-10 am 
MWI 


Cumulative jackpot of $2.50 a day. 

Consolation prizes of a dozen Do-Nuts 

and pound of coffee 


Listeners called during programs answer quiz 
questions. Correct answer wins jackpot 


WRFS. 
Alexander 

City, Ala. 


LIGGETT & MYERS 


Chesterfields 


Supper Club 


MTWTF 
7-7:15 pm 


"Star of the Week" contest; Tu nights 
only. $500 bond prize 


Winners of. pre-broadcast studio spelling bee 

name friends to receive phone call. Fri«nd must 

identify "mystery' voice" of screen star 


NBC 


MARS, INC 


"Forever 
Yours" 

Candy Bars 


Dr. I. Q. 


Monday 
9:30-10 pm 


Various cash prizes for questions and 
sketches used on the air 


Send brief sketch of famous personality and/or 
set of "Right 4 Wrong" statements with 6 
"Forever Yours" wrappers to program, Chi. 


NBC 


PHILIP MORRIS & CO 


Cigarettes 


Everybody 
Wins 


Friday 
10-10:30 pm 


$20-$100 in cash prizes 


Send list of 5 questions with P-M package 

wrapper to program. Cash for use, more if 

contestant misses 


CBS 


NATIONAL COUNCIL OF 
EPISCOPAL CHURCHES 


Institutional 


Great Scenes 

from 
Great Plays 


Friday 
7:30-8 pm 


Booklet: "Finding Your Way." Tells 

what Episcopal Church is, and what it 

stands for in modern world 


Free on request to local MBS stations carrying 
show 


MBS 




PARTICIPATING 


Various 


Your New 
York 


Saturday 
7:40-9 pm 


Weekly prizes of $50, $25 and five $5 
awards 


Complete last line of limericks shown during 
telecast. Send to program, c/o WPIX 


WPIX, 
N. Y. 


PET MILK SALES CORP 


Pet Milk 


Mary Lee 
Taylor 


Saturday 
10-10:30 am 


Miniature Pet Milk can charm for 

bracelet use. Also booklets on cookery' 

and baby care 


Send Pet Milk wrapper with name and address 

to program, St. Louis, for charm. Booklets 

free on request 


NBC 


PROCTER & GAMBLE 


Oxydol* 

Droit 


Ma Perkins & 
Brighter Day 


MTWTF 
3:15-3:30 pm 
' MTWTF 
10:45-11 pm 


Two plastic food storage bags 


Send 50c and two wrappers from either Oxydol 
or Dreft to sponsor, Cincinnati 


NBC 


PROCTER & GAMBLE 


Ivory 
Snow 


hions On 

Parade 


Friday 

8-8:30 pm 


$5,000 in various merchandise prizes 


Three viewers called each week. Mnst identify 

"Miss Terry" from clues. To be eligible, must 

write slogan, send with/without contribution 

for 1 SO Drive to program 


WABD, 
NY. 

Dumont 
Network 


PROCTER & GAMBLE 


Duz 


Truth or 
luences 


Saturday 

8:30-9 pm 


"Papa & Mama Hush" stockpile of 

merchandise and services. Mink coats, 

vacations, furniture etc, etc 


Three listeners called weekly try to identify 
mystery voices. To qualify, must have written 
iiiirrr. Mental Health Di with/ 
without contribution to contest. Hollywood 


NBC 


PRUDENTIAL INSURANCE 
CO 


Insurance 


.lark Kerch 
Show 


MTWTF 

11:30-11:45 am 


Occasional offer of booklet 


Free on request to program, Newark, N. J. 


NBC 


RALSTON PURINA CO 


Fan 


I'M. Arnold 


MTV 1 1 
1:15-1:30 pm 


Willys "Jeep" Station Wagon, RCA 
radio-TV set, home In -i zer, electric 
washer, etc. Stati contest prizes of 
honi' 


Poultry-raising contest. 90-day egg-laying 

record must be sen; on i blank, 

with 100 word letter on Purina Feeds. National 

and state contests 


MBS 


SINNETT-MEAOERS 
MOTORS CO 


Chrysler- 
Plymouth 

dealer 


i luy Lombardo 
Show 


Mond 
9:15 9 :45 am 


Service prizes, like grease job, oil 
change, poll i 

L 


Listeners must identify "Mystery Medley" of 
IS mill. Name of winner 
drawn from correct identifiers 


KADA, 

Okla. 


SUCHARO CHOCOLATE CO 


Suchard 
Almond 
Chocolate 

liars 


Jukebox 

Jury 


Saturday 

i i 30 


Sel of instructions for simple magic 
tricks, plus equipment for one trick 


: two Suchard wrappers to sponsor, 
\ 5 


WNEW, 

\ -i 


U S. TOBACCO CO 


Model, Dill's 
Best, "1 weed 
accos 


Take a 
Number . 


Saturday 
6 5:30 pm 


$5 for questions uscdi contents of 
jackpot if missed. $50 for correctly- 
answered jackpot questions 


1 .lui/ ami jackpol qui 1 
program, V 'I 


MBS 


volupte. inc Compacts 


The Better 
Half 


Thursday 
8:30-8:55 pm 


Volupte booklet: "Decorating 
Collector's Items" 


1 ii request to program, c/o Mutual, N. Y. 


MBS 


Wildi 

wildroot co Cream 


What's the 

Name ol 
That Song 


Wcdn 

10 pm 


$5 cash prizes 


nigs to program for 
progra 

1 


Don 
Lee 

i 






•National consumer contest tied in with Kroger Co. "Free fowl for a year for a family of four" bonus prizes. 



52 



SPONSOR 




Like Jack's 
beanstalk • , ♦ 



television towers can grow sky-high 
overnight, but it takes more than just a tower to 
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of operation, is a firmly established leader 
in the Detroit market. It has taken full 
advantage of its two-year "headstart" to stake its 
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to bring Detroiters an even greater diversity of 
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WWJ-TV is the one best television "buy" 
TOD A Y, in the multi-billion dollar Detroit market. 



FIRST IN MICHIGAN 



Owned and Operated by THE DETROIT NEWS 



National Representative*: THE GEORGE P HOLLINGBERY COMPANY 

ASSOCIATE AM FM STATION WWJ 



NBC Television Network 



3 JANUARY 1949 



53 



With a Single Contract 






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■The ^ 5tqt'<oni 

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CONFUSION PLUS 

(Continued from page 50) 

holds any large group of literary per- 
forming rights, these rights must be 
cleared in every case with the authors, 
agents, publishers, or heirs who are con- 
cerned. 

Music rights are usually divided into 
two classes: recording, and performing. 
Recording rights are nearly always 
cleared with the Music Publishers Pro- 
tective Association, especially where the 
recording is going to be the sound track 
on a film. Performing rights have to be 
cleared with ASCAP (American Society 
of Composers, Authors and Publishers) 
or with BMI (Broadcast Music, Inc.) 
This isn't always easy. At least 85 per 
cent of the ASCAP music is tied in, as far 
as its use in films is concerned, with con- 
tracts that forbid its use generally in 
films outside of theaters. This may stop 
the use of ASCAP music in TV since 
contracts ran out on 1 January 1949, 
prohibiting the showing of sponsored 
films and announcements that contain 
ASCAP music. Also, both ASCAP and 
BMI make a distinction between "grand" 
and "small" rights in music. A "grand" 
right usually means staging a number 
with appropriate costumes, and "small" 
rights mean any other performance. 
"Grand" rights cost more. BMI con- 
siders that anything short of music 
"furthering a plot, or telling a story" 
is a "small" right. ASCAP thinks differ- 
ently, and generally believes that any 
sort of costuming or production given to 
a number is a "grand" right, including 
often its use as background music in 
otherwise-silent films. 

The question of music rights in films 
brings up another vitally important set of 
rights, talent rights. Sponsors using live 
programing are usually quite safe in rely- 
ing on agencies and producers in the sign- 
ing of current TV talent contracts with 
actors, singers, writers, etc. But, spon- 
sors using film programing, particularly 
Hollywood products that are several 
years old, are often playing with legal 
dynamite. 

Since 1937, most Hollywood contracts 
have included a clause which states that 
the TV rights to the artist's work on film 
rest with the producing company. Con- 
tracts that do not have this clause are the 
ones that can cause trouble. Recently, 
Paramount Pictures' Los Angeles station, 
KTLA, found itself smack in the middle 
of such a case. Blanche Mehaffey Collins, 
a featured player in a 1931 thriller called 
Mystery Trouper, marched into court with 
a $100,000 suit when the film was tele- 



vised. She stated first of all that her 
original contract had pretty clearly drawn 
the line on where the film was to be shown 
in theaters) and that no mention was 
made of TV showings. When she made 
the picture, Miss Collins said, she hadn't 
been paid for any subsequent use in tele- 
vision. In addition, she claimed that 
since old films often televise poorly her 
facial image was "distorted." For that 
too, she wanted payment. 

As sponsor goes to press, the Collins 
case is still up in the air. The effect on 
the TV industry, however, has been wide. 
Some advertisers have become leery about 
using any kind of films, even when the 
TV rights are clear-cut and rest with the 



producer or the broadcaster. The safest 
approach for a TV advertiser using film 
shorts, or any other film fare is to invest i 
gate thoroughly when he buys. It does 
not mean that he has to swear off films 
entirely. 

Even the sponsor of live program 
with his talent safely covered by TV con- 
tracts, has a problem which is a second- 
cousin to the Collins case. Many sports 
programs (such as the Gillette TV fight 
cards, Chesterfield ball games, various 
special events, etc.) sometimes swing their 
TV cameras around to catch the excited 
reaction of the crowd. Variety shows 
(such as Texaco Star Theater and Phil 
Silvers Show, etc.) will include shots of the 



SURE, 

some Chicago stations 

can "reach" South Bend 
. . . but the audience 

LISTENS 

to WSBT! 



You wanl listeners, not merely signal strength, 
for your radio dollars. Listeners are what 
\.mi fid mi WSBT. This station is the over- 
whelming choice of listeners in the South 
Bend market. No other station — Chicago, 
local, or elsewhere — even comes close in 
Share "f Audience. Want proof? See Hooper. 




PAUL H. RAYMER COMPANY 



5000 WATTS 



NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



3 JANUARY 1949 



55 




Example 



V* MILLION 

PIECES of MAIL 

and 

phone calls* 

DURING 1948! 

*."» l.OOO conceriilnsE a series of 
l:i—l/2 hour programs 



WIP 

Philadelphia 
Basic Mutual 

Represented Nationally 

m 



EIIWARO PETRY & CO 




audience applauding an act. From a pro- 
graming standpoint, it's good TV. From 
a legal standpoint, it can sometimes be 
bad business. 

It centers primarily on the question of 
"Right of Privacy," first formulated by 
the late Justice Brandeis in 1890. The 
Right of Privacy can be a nebulous thing 
at times, and there are many interpreta- 
tions of it. It is upheld as common law in 
16 states, upheld by statute in three, "on- 
the-fence" in four, denied completely in 
two, and "indefinite" in the remaining. 
It applies to TV in much the same way 
that it applies to motion pictures (news- 
reels), and the governing laws are the 
same. 

In general, when an event is considered 
to be of "public importance" the balance 
of the law is in the favor of the "public's 
interest" (i.e. the TV viewers') as regards 
the privacy of the spectators. Minus the 
legal terminology that means that spec- 
tators, even movie stars who may have 
ironclad TV-appearance rights in their 
contracts, have a lot less legal privacy 
coming to them in box seats at Madison 
Square Garden than they are entitled to 
at home. 

O.K. So spectators at public events 
don't have privacy. What then is the 
problem? 

The law has two loopholes. First, the 
"waiver by conduct" (where you are and 
what you're doing) does not apply in 
every state. It is not recognized in all 
cases in New York, Virginia and Utah. 

The other "out" concerns the extent to 
which a spectator becomes part of the 
production of a TV show. The courts 
have established that a person seen on the 
newsreel screens in a crowd scene (long 
shot) has no court case against the movie- 
makers. However, if the camera — in this 
case the TV camera at a public event — 
singles out an individual in the crowd and 
proceeds to make that person part of the 
show by showing a series of reactions to 
the event, a signed release is necessary. 
Otherwise, the sponsor may wind up on 
the wrong end of a law suit. This applies 
particularly to unscheduled ad-lib inter- 
views at public events where nobody 
bothered to have a release form handy. 
The damages that can be collected are 
sizeable. The record substantiates this. 

There are other legal problems that 
I, u e the TV advertiser. Until the situa- 
tion with the musicians' union is straight- 
ened out, many Hollywood-made films 
with musical soundtracks cannot be 
shown in TV. Each film has to be checked 
carefully, and the word of the producer 
or the film distributor is often not enough. 

Advertisers whose TV programs are 



56 



SPONSOR 



shown in bars, night clubs, theater 
shown in bars, night clubs and theater 
lobbies, hotels, camps, etc., have a 
peculiar legal problem on their hands. 
Surveys have shown that TV has in 
creased bar profits up to 60%, and an 
advertiser has a right to feel that tin 
tavern-keeper is "reaping where he has 
not sown." Years ago, Pepsodent won a 
suit to restrain theater managers from 
broadcasting Amos V Andy to paying 
customers in theaters. (Pepsodent never 
enforced the decision, after realizing the 
promotional value.) No advertiser has 
put the case to a test yet, but there is a 
possibility that this sort of history may 
repeat itself. The only precedent laid 
down in this respect has been against 
theaters, halls, etc. They cannot show 
commercially-sponsored or sustaining TV 
programs on laige screens before paid 
audiences, without permission of the 
sponsor and the broadcaster. 

There is actually no basic set of rules 
that an advertiser can memorize to act 
as a generally suitable guide to TV law. 
Each case is a problem, and must be met 
with careful attention to the facts. The 
courts of the land, when dealing with 
radio and TV problems, have of late been 
"granting relief" where it seems most 
warranted, even if the facts of the case 
can't fit any standard legal pattern. 

If there is such a thing as a legal "rule 
of thumb" for a TV sponsor, it should be 
this: "Investigate before, not after, the 
fact." * * * 



fi e Swing iT^WinJCans^^ 



PETER PAUL 

(Continued from page 25) 
The Coast stations put on a newscast . . . 
run it awhile . . . and yank it off, or move 
it elsewhere. We prefer to buy audiences, 
and to do it we buy news shows that have 
built such an audience. When we can't 
find them, we just have to create them 
ourselves, although we'd rather not have 
to do it and we avoid doing it whenever 
possible." 

In this agency man's statement lie two 
fundamental portions of Peter Paul's 
radio thinking. They do not like to build 
their audiences from scratch, as many a 
time salesman and station rep has learned 
the hard way. Wherever possible, Peter 
Paul buy shows that have held down 
their news slot for several years (Ex- 
amples: Peter Paul newscasts on WOR, 
WNBC, WHO, WGN, WBZ, WSM etc.). 
When this can't be done, Peter Paul dc 
what they consider to be the next best 
thing and buys 1 -minute spots in front 
and-back of established newscasts, feeling 
that they get much the same effect since 
(Please turn to page 64) 

3 JANUARY 1949 




Resolution 

for the New Year . • • 

oving to WHB in Kansas City for increased sales in 
1949. WHB merchandises and advertises. WHB pro- 
motes its programs, its sponsors and their products. 
Resolve now to reach — and sell — the Golden Kansas 
City Marketland dominated by WHB ! 



10,000 WATTS IN KANS4 




DON DAVIS m 
p^pi^ JOHN T. SCHILLING 3| 

\J^ |_fUU GENfUAl MANAGE* ^ 

JOHN BL AIR & CC 
MUTUAL NETWORK • 710 KILOCYCLES • 5,000 WATTS NIGH 



57 



^^t 



u 



There is no hocus-pocus about CBS' leadership in delivering large audiences. 
Proof: 9 out of 13 programs which switched networks during the past year 
won larger audiences on CBS than on any other network. Which explains why 
more advertisers continue to turn to CBS to lift their sales curves. 

The Columbia Broadcasting System 



» 




SUNDAY 



MONDAY 



o 
onv 



TUESDAY 



WEDNESDAY 



THURSDAY 



-o 



FRIDAY 



SATURDAY 



nB[ I RBI MI BBl IBS IMS HB( | BBC [BS RIBS BBC | BBC 



C<^ 



*? 



** 



January 1949 

TV Compcrogreph in next issue 



SPONSORS 






It 15.0,- «.*, 



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The "HILARIUS" in the Olympics, - 
Station WHEC In Rochester 



..FIRST BY LENGTHS! 



WHEC is Rochester's most-listened-to station and has 
been ever since Rochester has been Hooperated! 

Furthermore, Station WHEC is one of the select Hooper 
"Top Twenty" stations in the United States! 




Latest Hooper before closing fr'me. 



STATION 



STATION 



WHEC B 
MORNING 41.7 25.7 



8:00-12:00 A.M. 
Monday through Fr 



AFTERNOON 37.5 32.0 



STATION 

c 

6.5 



9.3 



D 

3.0 

6.5 



E 

14.3 

9.0 



12:00-6:00 P.M. 
Monday through Fri. 

EVENING 

6:00-10:00 P.M. 
Sunday through Sat. 



36.6 31.1 6.9 8.4 13.8 

SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER HOOPER, 1948 



STATION 

F 

6.5 



5.4 



Station 
Broadcast 

till Sunset 
Only 



lafeir before closing time. 



BUY WHERE THEY'RE LISTENING:- 




MEMBER GANNETT 
RADIO GROUP 




N. Y. 
5,000 WATTS 



Representatives: J. P. McKINNEY & SON, New York, Chicago, HOMER GRIFFITH CO., Los Angeles, San Francisco 



3 JANUARY 1949 



63 



PETER PAUL 

{Continued from page 57) 

dialers to newscasts (particularly in the 
morning hours where most P-P newscasts 
are heard) tune in before the news starts, 
and stay tuned for some time after it's 
over. Thus, the commercial message 
reaches news audiences. 

Why newscasts, anyway? 

This is a question often asked of the 
Peter Paul agencies. The answer lies in 
the audience composition of newscasts. 
Research showed Peter Paul, early in air 
advertising history, that the audience dur- 
ing early-morning, noontime, and early 
evening newscast periods almost paral- 
lelled the percentage of men, women and 
children in the U. S. population. The 
same breakdown held an even more strik- 
ing parallel to the relative amounts of 
men, women and children who are con- 
sumers of Peter Paul's candy products. 
This is the underlying reason why Peter 
Paul are convinced their newscasts are the 
best form of advertising they can use. 



There are two additional factors that 
strengthen this belief. Recent surveys 
have shown Peter Paul that nearly 75% of 
the more than 750,000 retail outlets for 
Peter Paul candies have a radio receiver 
somewhere in the store. Almost the same 
percentage of retail proprietors are regular 
listeners to Peter Paul newscasts. Thus, 
their newscasts are, so far as radio- 
equipped stores are concerned, a form of 
point-of-sale advertising. Furthermore, 
dealers (notoriously hard to sell on any 
radio advertising backing for a product as 
a reason for stocking up on that product) 
are well aware of the fact that Peter Paul 
advertising works for them too. They 
can hear it work. 

Of considerable importance too is the 
turnover factor in 1 5-minute newscasts. 
Most Peter Paul newscasts are this length, 
a few are 10 minutes. None are shorter. 
Peter Paul discovered that the turnover 
in audience in the 1 5-minute newscast is 
extremely low, running mound 5-10' , 
where the particular newscast has built an 
established habit of listening. Besides 




being a good reason for sticking to one 
form of radio advertising, in this case 
news, it also means that Peter Paul get 
retail value in advertising at wholesale 
cost. It works out like this. On a typical 
Peter Paul newscast where the entire strip 
runs on a Monday-through-Friday basis, 
Peter Paul's usual purchase is Monday- 
Wednesday-Friday. This enables them to 
reach something like 90% of the regular 
audience (the ideal cross-section of Peter 
Paul consumers) at 60% of the cost for the 
full week. Peter Paul can therefore 
stretch their budget ever more mar- 
kets, leaving the station the relatively 
easy problem of selling the newscast on a 
twice-weekly basis to somebody else. 
Since Peter Paul buy only the top news 
shows (many of which have long waiting 
lists of prospective clients), and hold on 
to the top ones year in and year out, few 
stations complain. 

Once having spotted a newscast that 
they think will do the job for them, Peter 
Paul turn on the pressure, through their 
two agencies, to get it. If the period is 
not for sale, Peter Paul will try for fore- 
and-aft 1 -minute announcements, or try 
to buy into it on the odd days. It is often 
a waiting game. Peter Paul, however, are 
content to wait sometimes three or four 
years until they get what they want, 
something few advertisers are willing to 
do. Station managers get the impression 
that Peter Paul is a firm with a one-track 
mind, but the resemblance is more pro- 
nounced between Peter Paul and the 
smart gin-rummy player who is building 
his winning hand in one suit by a patient 
pick up . . . evaluate . . . discard . . . 
routine. 

The end-product is higher ratings, 
better audiences, and better sales for 
Peter Paul. One clear example of how 
this works out in practice is found in the 
New York market, a state that spent 
nearly $80,000,000 for candy products 
last year, 53% of which was for bar candy. 
These figures mean, to Peter Paul, that 
there is a $42,000,000 potential market at 
which to pin-point their advertising mes- 
sage. Five newscasts are therefore used 
on four stations to service the market. 
Two of them (Don Gardner on W J Z thrice 
weeklj at 7-7:10 a.m.; Charles F. 
McCarthy on WNBC thrice weekly at 
7:30-7:45 a.m.) fall outside of the 8:00 
a.m. start for Hooperatings, but the mail 
pull m periodic Peter Paul contests and 
offers show that they are holding their 
own well. The figures for the other three 
shows indicate clearly why Peter Paul, 
having had each of them for five or more 
years, continue to pay the bills. The 
three Prescott Robinson, Kenneth Bang- 



64 



SPONSOR 



I 



hart and Fred Van Deventer — are the 
top-rated programs, news or otherwise, 
for their time periods. They also top the 
opposition on independent stations. 

Period: 8-8:15 a.m., thrice weekly 
WOK WCBS WJZ WNBC 

(Robinson) (News) (Agronsky) (News- 

Bob Smith) 
4.5 3.1 1.6 1.3 

Period: 6-6:15 p.m.. thrice weekly 
WNBC WCBS WJZ WOK 

(Banghart) (Severeid) (New-- (News) 

Sports) 
3.7 2.6 1.5 2.6 

Period: 6:30-6:45 p.m., thrice weekly 
WOR WCBS WJZ WNBC 

(Van Dev.) (Shriner) (Miscel.) (Miscel.) 

4.9 2.6 2.0 1.3 

These figures, from a typical N. Y. 
Hooper rating period (Sept.'Oct.), show 
graphically how Peter Paul builds their 
selective newscast success. Each of these 
shows features newscasters who are well- 
known local (and sometimes national or 
regional) personalities. To avoid any 
suggestion of "pressure selling," each 
show uses an announcer for the commer- 
cials and a newscaster for the news. Each 
show has carefully been built up as a 
listening habit, and has occupied its 
marginal time slot for as long as a dozen 
or more years. Each show features plenty 
of local news (something network news- 
casts can't do effectively) and local 
weather reports which are a must. Each 
newscast strip is sponsored, to reach the 
maximum audience at a minimum cost, 
for 15 minutes, three times a week. 

The same selling theories are being 
carried over into TV by Peter Paul. The 
candy firm is currently sponsoring film 
spots on WJZ-TV, New York in time 
slots as close as possible to TV newscasts. 
They are a visual presentation of the 
familiar radio copy themes, based on 
quality (". . . the finest sun-ripened coco- 
nut") and taste (". . . the best chocolate, 
the most delicious coconut and almonds") 
that have proved a success with the news- 
cast audiences. Peter Paul expect to 
increase their experimental TV budgets, 
if the medium proves a success. Early 
indications are that it is, since the product 
itself and the package have a high eye- 
appeal factor and the TV films are care- 
fully and expertly done. A sizeable hunk 
of the Peter Paul ad budget may even- 
tually go into TV news, just as it has for 
radio news. 

Peter Paul were lucky in finding their 
ideal selling vehicle in marginal-time 
news periods, handled on a selective 
basis. The continuing successful use of 
the medium, however, isn't luck. It is the 
result of careful study of the advertising 
lessons learned in over a decade of com- 
petitive selling. * * * 



CEREALS ON AIR 

{Continued from page 23) 

of 1929, they started Jolly BUI and Jane 
on NBC. The program was basically 
built around a teller of fairy tales. Re- 
action to Jolly Bill and Jane was quick 
in coming after the sponsor tried out a 
few premium offers. However, it wasn't 
too long before parents began to yell that 
the stories, which were growing increas- 
ingly blood-curdling, were keeping the 
youngsters awake all night. But the 
blood and thunder rush was on. 
Kellogg, which had been sponsoring 



Irene Wicker as the Singing Lady on 
WGN in 1931, switched her to NBC for 
nation-wide impact. Post, which had 
been sponsoring Real Folks on Blue, 
dropped it like a hot brick and went on 
NBC with Paul Wing, The Story Man, in 
1932. General Mills added Skippy to 
their growing list of programs and went on 
NBC (later switched to CBS). During 
the summer of 1932, Heinz Co. went on 
CBS with Joe Palooka to sell Rice Flakes. 
Kellogg decided to collect upon the 
rattle of gunfire around the dinner hour, 
took a deep breath and added Buck 




m n j j jp p w ii muum 



$150,000,000 . . . that's the value of the signed contracts with which KLEE-TV 
began telecasting January 1, 1949. . . . And the sponsors can't be wrong, 
because KLEE-TV is the only television station in Houston, Texas, the largest 
market in the great Southwest. 



IF YOU WANT TO SELL HOUSTON BY 
TELEVISION YOU MUST USE 



KL€€-TV 

"The Eyes of Texas" . . . Channel 2 . . . Houston 
Houston Affiliate of the CBS Television Network 






Effective 
Radiated Power 

16KW 

Studios: 

Milby Hotel 
Houston 2 



Represented Nationally By: 

ADAM J. YOUNG, JR., INC. 

22 East 40th Street . . . New York, N. Y. 
Murray Hill 9-O006 

55 East Washington Street . . . Chicago, III. 
Andover 3-5448 

627 Mills Building . . . San Francisco, Calif. 
Garfield 1-7950 

448 South Hill Street . . . Los Angeles, Calif. 
Michigan 6203 



3 JANUARY 1949 



65 



WHO'S 
GOT 




F1F1H 




During SPONSOR'S earliest days 
surveys of sponsor and advertising 
agency trade paper reading babits 
came I hick and fast. Each showed 
a snowballing preference for 
SPONSOR. linl today things arc 
bad in the survey field. So had, 
in fact, that certain zealous sales- 
man are taking old and outmoded 
surveys oul of mothballs and repre- 
senting them as up-to-date guides 
(or purchase of trade paper spare. 
It's not a healthy situation. So, to 
buyers of trade paper space \sv sa\. 
look for the date on the survey. 



the 1st Survey 



December 1946 

When KMBC. kan>as Cit\. made this one 
SPONSOR was one issue old. We didn't 
do very well, but better than expected. Out 
of eight radio trade publications rated h\ 
agencj executives, SPONSOR was fourth. 
SPONSOR polled 139 points; the top 
publication 706. 



the 2nd Survey 



January 1947 

Pre- & Peters did this study. SPONSOR 
was just two issues old. The return from 
1. 000 sponsor and agenc) executive ques- 
tionnaires showed the fledgling catching on 
fast. No. not yel a winner. Bu1 SPON- 
SOR polled 1,198 point-: the top radio 
publication 3,53 I . 



the 3rd Survey 

March 1947 

WJW, Cleveland, made t his king-size sur- 
vey. SPONSOR had five issues under its 
belt. Nearly 2.000 sponsors and agencj 
executives specified in which of the nine 
advertising trade magazines carrying WJW 
advertising they recalled seeing the sta- 
tion's trademark. SPONSOR was second. 



the 4th Survey 



January 1948 

WJW's second annual survey revealed 
SPONSOR really coming into its own. 
8,500 postcards went to radio-minded ad- 
vertisers and agencies; 2,067 were returned. 
SPONSOR was again second, but it was 
the only magazine showing a gain over the 
last study. SPONSOR'S gain was 300%. 



the 5th Survey 



Who's got the 5th survey? We're 
in our third year, aiul frankly we're 
very tired of looking at one-two- 
five-and- fourteen -issue -old ratings. 
SPONSOR is moving ahead. Ask 
your national representative. Or 
ask your nearest sponsor, account 
executive, or timebuyer. 




for buyers of broadcast advertising 



BEWARE! The 2nd survey, two years old, is again making 
the rounds, undated. SPONSOR was two issues old when it 
was first shown. We're (or up-to-date, and dated, surveys. 



Rogers on CBS. General Mills, alarmed 
at outcries that Skippy was becoming a 
blood bath, dropped it and came back 
fast with Jack Armstrong, a watered down 
adventure series, which in the early days 
of 1933 wasn't too much of an improve- 
ment. Hecker Products began sponsoring 
Bobby Benson (H-Bar-O) on CBS. Rals- 
ton, whose profitable cereal business plays 
second fiddle to its farm feed business, had 
been sponsoring Sekatary Hawkins, a 
three - times - weekly comedy - detective 
show on NBC during 1932 and part of 
1933. When Ralston saw how the trend 



was going, they dropped Hawkins, and 
grabbed off Tom Mix, straight-shootin' 
cowboy star. Other sponsors from the 
milk drink, candy, and food fields fol- 
lowed the cereal companies into advertis- 
ing's newest green pasture. The bark of 
six-shooters and the roar of disintegrator 
rays drowned out all but the loudest of 
parent's outcries against the "menace" to 
their kiddies' peace of mind. The kiddies, 
whose appetite for both the air adventure 
strip and the various forms of hot and 
cold cereal sold to them seemed limitless, 
literally ate it up. 






•f Hi 1 

The supplying of frozen 
poultry to hungr) metro- 
politan markets is Hid 
BI SINESS anion!.' WIBW 
listeners. 

We're railing this to 
your attention because 
it's just one of the many 
new and diversified sources 
of revenue that add a hiji 
PLl S to the spendable in- 
come of our farm and 
Bmall town radio audience 
. . . your guarantee of 
year-round buying power. 

Remember this picture 
the next time you're carv- 
ing a chicken or turkey. 

I. el it remind you that the 
greatest personalized sell- 
ing force in Kansas and 
ad joining states is . . . 

WIBW. 



; 



"W 



w 



(r 



\ 



SERVING AND SELLING 

"THE MAGIC CIRCLE" 

WIBW • TOPEKA, KANSAS • WIBW-FM 



v , \ 




X ', \ 


kans. ; mo. ; % i 




. " "• - Ah 


c 


1 OKLA. 'ARK. J 


B 




S 



S\ 



z& 



Rep: CAPPER PUBLICATIONS, Inc. • BEN LUDY, Gen. Mgr. • WIBW • KCKN • KCKN-FM 



During the yeats 1932-1935, when the 
juvenile cycle hit the all-time peak of 52 
commercial and sustaining shows on all 
the networks, there were a few (very few) 
hold-outs among the cereal manufac- 
turers. Cream of Wheat ran Angelo Patri 
and Alexander Woollcott for a few years 
(1931-1936) in addition to Jolly Bill and 
Jane, which left the air in 1933. It gave 
up in disgust in 1935, and grabbed up 
Buck Rogers for a six months run. Post 
also sponsored a nighttime comedy strip, 
Tony & Gus, for a short run in 1935 on 
NBC. General Mills had Betty and Bob 
on from 1932 to 1938. Quaker started 
three adult-appeal shows in 1930, Phil 
Cook, Gene & Glenn, and Ear/y Birds, but 
threw in the towel after a couple of years 
and bought Dick Daring and Babe Ruth 
for short runs in 1933 and 1934. The 
modest Mid-West milling firm of Little 
Crow Milling Co. (Coco-Wheats) bought 
the Jolly Joe program in 1935, and 
quickly established distribution in 60 days 
of broadcasting on WLS, Chicago. 

It was premium advertising that put 
the brakes on a booming juvenile cycle. 
The cereal advertisers discovered that in 
order to stay a jump ahead of their com- 
petition, and to keep the enthusiastic but 
fickle audience of moppets continuously 
urging their parents to buy, there had to 
be premiums. Lots of premiums. And 
contests. Lots of contests. And secret 
clubs. Lots of clubs. And offers. Lots 
of offers. And more premiums, pre- 
miums, premiums, premiums, and pre- 
miums. 

Cream of Wheat gave away cowboy and 
Indian pictures and ran contests offering 
cars, bicycles, sporting goods, etc. Gen- 
eral Foods' Post Division gave away 
maps, beetleware spoons, cutouts, rings, 
memberships in "Inspector Post's Junior 
Detective Club," etc. General Mills, who 
thrives on razzle-dazzle promotions, led 
the field with model planes, Jack Demp- 
sey autographed jigsaw puzzles, dishes, 
rings, games, and books for varying 
amounts of boxtops. Hecker-H-0 piled 
up carloads of boxtops in exchange for 
cowboy suits, tie clasps, bracelets and so 
forth. Kellogg offered a U7iee/ oj Knowl- 
edge, storybooks, moving picture toys, and 
other premiums. Quaker had its Babe 
Ruth Club memberships, books, gliders, 
sports gear, and a long string of contests. 
Ralston offered Tom Mix photos, lucky 
rings, and other frontier gear for the tops 
of Ralston boxes. There were many 
others. 

A factor that many cereal firms had 
overlooked came to light during the 
Batik of the Boxtops. Premiums worked 
fine, and juvenile radio sold well . . . until 



68 



K SPONSOR 



some competing firm came along with a 
bigger and "better" premium. Then, the 
sales, which had shot ahead during the 
big push of the promotion, would drift 
back again as the juvenile audience, with 
a youthful disregard for the harassed ad- 
vertising managers of the cereal firms, 
would gleefully urge their equally harassed 
parents to change cereal brands again. 

Something had to give. Many firms in 
the late 1930's began to switch from the 
merry-go-round of bloodcurdlers and into 
nighttime programing. Cream of Wheat 
dropped radio altogether, and didn't pick 
it up again until they started with Break' 
Jast Club at the end of 194 1 . Post Cereals 
dropped most of their kid shows, and 
went over to nighttime programing with 
shows like We, The People; Believe It Or 
Not; and Burns and Allen in 1937, and 
Joe E. Brown, Joe Penner, Al Pearce and 
Boake Carter in 1938. General Mills 
stuck (and has ever since) with Jack Arm- 
strong but added daytime radio like 
Arnold Grimm's Daughter in 1937 and 
later nighttime comedy and selective 
sportscasts. Kellogg had short runs on 
NBC in 1935-1936 with Kellogg College 
Prom and Girl Alone, and kept the Singing 
Lady on the air until 1938. Quaker took 
a fling on NBC with Kaltenmeyer's 
Kindergarten and Mar go oj Castelewood (a 
daytime strip) and added a toned-down 
version of Dick Tracy. 

The coming of the war in 1941 brought 
another cycle to breakfast food advertis- 
ing. With the government urging war 
workers to eat big, healthy breakfasts of 
unrationed breakfast food, and the metal- 
and-paper shortage ringing down the cur- 
tain on kid's premiums, the makers of 
breakfast food hopped on the nutrition 
bandwagon. More and more cereal ad- 
vertisers began to sell to the housewife, 
and to the family. Juvenile programs 
dwindled down to a fraction of what they 
had been. A few were picked up for 
cereal sponsorship. General Mills bought 
the semi-adult Lone Ranger in 1941, and 
has been selling Cheerios with it since, 
primarily to a nighttime audience. Post 
Cereals had a 13-week run with Don 
Winslow in 1942-43. Kellogg bought 
Superman (newest of the moppet's air 
heroes) in 1943 and ran it until 1946. 

Wartime radio for the breakfast food 
advertisers ranged mostly from night- 
time comedy and music shows, to news- 
casts and daytime radio. The majority 
of it was at night, aimed at the adult 
listener. General Foods was one of the 
earliest to use a thoroughly constructive 
children's program, the superstition- 
busting House oj Mystery on MBS, which 
it acquired for Sunday afternoon sponsor- 

3 JANUARY 1949 




Cbi Open £ette% 

Brought to you by 

WCSC 

from JOHN M. RIVERS 



JL O those who ask us to accept per inquiry 
deals, our answer is NO. 

J. O those who want a free ride by giving 
away merchandise and getting publicity on 
time paid for by other advertisers, our 
answer is NO. 

JL O those who try to tempt us to double- 
spot by offering contracts for time signal 
announcements at a low rate, our answer 
is NO. 

iVND our answer is NO to all other bad 
practices which put the radio industry and 
ourselves in jeopardy. 

-DUT to our many good friends and 
customers who have used good prac- 
tices, we extend our Thanks. 



WCSC 

CHARLESTON 

"The CBS Slation 
for (he Coastal Carolinas" 



Represented Nationally by FREE & PETERS, INC. 



69 



-d 



ship in the latter pait of the 1940's. 
In the remaining few years that led to 
the present day situations in breakfast 
food advertising, there have been few 
basic changes in programing. The 
juvenile show, once the war was over, 
returned to newer and bigger premiums, 
this time with an atomic twist wherever 
possible. But although their number is 
increasing slowly, in proportion to the 
amount of breakfast food advertising 
directed at older groups, there is little 
likelihood that there will be a return in 
radio to the overpowering blood-and- 
thunder cycle of the early 1930's. 



Radio selling today is balanced between 
selling the homemaker and her family, as 
well as hei children. Television, which 
has witnessed the re-emergence of the 
juvenile program as a selling factor (a 
future sponsor program study), for ex- 
ample the swift rise to fame of NBC's 
Howdy Doody, may bring another story. 

Whether breakfast food advertising in 
TV will repeat the same mistakes as it 
made in radio is, at the moment, any- 
body's guess. Broadcasting despite trial 
and error advertising on the air has proved 
that it sells . . . breakfast food. * * * 



SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA'S I'lOStee/l RADIO STATION 




For over 24 
years, WDBJ 
has maintained 
FIRST place 
in PRESTIGE, 
COVERAGE, SERVICE and 
LISTENERSHIP in Roanoke 
and most of Southwest Virginia. 

Here's an old timer with young ideas! One good 
example is an efficient promotion department set up 
lo increase listener and dealer acceptance for your 
show and your product. 

\sL Free «K Peters ! 



CBS • 5000 WATTS • 960 KC 

Owned and Operated by the 
TIMES-WORLD CORPORATION 

ROANOKE, VA. 

FREE & PETERS. INC., National Representatives 



RADOX 

(Continued from page 33) 

will be manual and three sets of figures 
will be regularly released for listening in 
Philadelphia based upon these homes. 
These will be program ratings, length of 
time the average listener is tuned to each 
piogram, and the number of families 
listening to each program. It is planned 
that this information will be teletyped to 
subscribers within 15 minutes after their 
programs are off the air. It will thus be 
possible, if desired, to hold a post- 
mortem in the broadcast studio directly 
after an airing. 

However, Al Sindlinger stresses at all 
times that quantitative figures have their 
limitations. A high rating for a program 
does not give the sponsor, and or the pro- 
ducer information of what kept the audi- 
ence listening. The Radox figure on the 
holding power of the program (the aver- 
age length of time listeners stay with the 
show) gives a more conclusive picture of 
the appeal of a specific broadcast but it 
still is only the beginning of what an ad- 
vertiser should know about his program. 
The next step, says Sindlinger is Teldox, 
which electronically reports on what 
panels of listeners feel about programs. 
Each member of the panel has a dial in 
his or her hand which permits the registra- 
tion of five variations of reaction to a 
show. By moving a pointer, each person 
registering his reaction can indicate that 
he thinks the program is: "superior," 
"good," "neutral," "inferior," or "bad." 
The Teldox program analyzer panel is 
composed of a maximum of 40 persons 
and is frequently much lower. A Teldox 
report gives not only the average reaction 
to the program but the panel reaction on 
all five levels: "superior," "good," "neu- 
tral," "inferior" and "bad." It is thus 
possible for a sponsor to avoid kidding 
himself, which sometimes happens when 
the "superior" cancels out the "bad" and 
the report shows a fairly high reaction 
level. However, Sindlinger doesn't feel 
that even Teldox gives a true picture of 
the appeal of a program. He feels that 
it's essential that the sponsor know why 
each panel listener reacts the way he does. 
To obtain this information, Sindlinger 
puts his third form of research (Recordox) 
to work. This is a variation of the depth 
interview form of research during which 
the respondent is asked questions aimed 
at uncovering the reasons-why he liked 
or disliked portions of a program. With- 
out realizing it, the interviewee is actually 
psy< In (analyzed and is led mentally by the 
hand until the true reason for his re- 
actions are obtained. Normal depth 



70 



SPONSOR 



w,th 5000 WATTS 

WGH Blankets 
Virginia's Largest Market 

NORFOLK- PORTSMOUTH- NEWPORT NEWS 




On the air with 5000 watts, WGH — a pioneer voice of over 20 years — reaches 
out to further service for the 200,000 plus radio families in this vital and growing market. 
Here are population increases trebling 1940 census figures — effective family buying income 
many hundreds of dollars above the national average — and now a 20 times more powerful, 
low cost radio medium to deliver you the entire trade area. 



WGH 




ABC for Norfolk, Portsmouth, 

1' FREE & PETERS. IlNT.EvrW, Natwnal Representatives Ne *P 0rt NeWS 

AFFILIATED WITH THE DAILY PRESS— TIMES HERALD 



interviews are aimed at obtaining this 
information but Sindlinger goes further by 
recording the interviews. Since an in- 
flection of the voice can often mean 
almost as much as the actual words used 
by a respondent, the truth is arrived at 
much more accurately than by a steno- 
graphic report — or an interviewer's 
memory. 

Radox is quick. Teldox can be fairly 
rapid. Recordox, like all intensive quali- 
tative research, is the slowest of the 
three. It is also the most valuable in the 
long run. 

Although Radox has only been oper- 
ated via telephone line connections, it is 
claimed that the same monitoring can be 
accomplished via radio and by radar. 
Both of the latter monitoring methods are 
at present only in the laboratory. The 
fact that Radox is presently dependent 
upon telephone line connection from the 
home set to the central listening point 
does not mean that Radox is restricted to 
telephone homes. The full 300 Philadel- 
phia home sample will have the correct 
balance of telephone and non-telephone 
homes. It is also important to note that 
Sindlinger does not have to pay for direct 
lines from each home to the central eaves- 
dropping point. Telephone lines are run 
from the homes to switching points and a 



single line is run from the switching point 
to the monitoring control. Thus cost of 
lines is kept to a minimum. This is im- 
portant since the radio industry is fighting 
the steadily increased costs of research at 
present. If Radox were to be more costly 
than current rating services it could not 
hope for acceptance. It is not more ex- 
pensive and since it is a more immediate 
form of research and unquestionably 
more accurate, it may be the answer to 
the need for information on "how many" 
people aie listening. Teldox and Re- 
cordox may likewise be the answer to 
"why" they listen. 

The big problem for Sindlinger is to get 
them all operating regularly as quickly as 
possible . . . only by regular program by 
program, station by station reports, will 
the final answer to his research usefull- 
ness be reached. * * * 



DOWN TO EARTH 

(Continued from page 29) 

Stations carrying the ABC or MBS kid 
strips of course reach many farm children. 
These shows, however, vary in popularity 
not only between themselves, but from 
area to area, quite as much as do daytime 



o Fallen Arches 



Keystone 

(IOWA) 




Salesmen don't have to wear their 
arches to the nub in Keystone . . . 
WMT gets around for them. The 
town itself isn't much bigger than 
a statistic, but when added to the 
Big Rocks and Stone Cities and 
1058 other towns and cities in 
WMTland, it becomes a part of 
one of the world's most prosperous 
markets. 

The way to build a triumphal 
arch of sales into this area is clear: 
use WMT, Eastern Iowa's only CBS 
outlet. Ask the Katz man for full 
details. 



i 



,.v 



NkV?,*i. 









WMT 

CEDAR RAPIDS 

5000 Watts 600 K.C. Day & Night 
BASIC COLUMBIA NETWORK 



serials for adults. 

Rural Radio Network airs programs for 
children in both the 5-10 year group and 
the older youngsters. At first RRN 
spotted the young juvenile programs 
Clumpy the Bear, Once Upon a Time, and 
dramatic presentations of adventure 
stories done live, straight reading of ad- 
venture classics, etc., at 4:45 p.m. on the 
theory they'd have time after arriving 
home from school to listen while having 
milk and cake before chore time. The 
youngsters themselves protested the time. 
That, said RRN, shows how wrong you 
can be by guessing the apparently obvi- 
ous. Research set the right time as 5~ 5 :30 
for the moppets, 6:45-7 for the older 
group. 

Youth shows are Youth RFD, thrice a 
week interviews and discussions (usually 
via tape recordings) on 4-H or FFA 
matters. For straight entertainment 
there's Burt & Stoney, a pair of Lum & 
Abnerish characters with a running story 
about farming. 

Reaching farm families at night is in 
many ways a much less complex program- 
ing problem than at any other time, 
despite the fact that less is actually 
known about rural nighttime listening 
than is known about daytime listening. 
The problem is first limited by the farm 
family's going to bed early. By 10 o'clock 
some 70% of their radios are off. Regional 
differences affect this average figure con- 
siderably. 

The second simplifying element is the 
fact that farm families, generally speak- 
ing, like the same kinds of entertainment 
programs as city dwellers. From this 
point, however, the advertiser who is 
interested in the most effective appeal to 
farm audiences will find questions multi- 
plying. One reason is that both quanti- 
tative (how many) and qualitative (why) 
research on farm audiences is extremely 
meager. (Farm audience research is the 
subject of a forthcoming sponsor report.) 

In this near-vacuum, however, limited 
research studies plus the experience of 
station people have turned on some light. 

The same general pattern of rural re- 
sponse to music programs during the day 
seems to hold good at night. W ; th excep- 
tion of religious music, which is more 
popular with women, "oldtime" music is 
about equally popular with men and 
women. 

Despite exceptions that can be dis- 
covered in certain areas where important 
numbers of listeners don't fit the pattern, 
the great majority of farm audiences like 
less sophisticated, "cornier" plays than 
their urban counterparts. 



72 



SPONSOR 






The U. S. Hooperatings indicate this 
tendency, and numerous more limited 
surveys agree strikingly with it. The 
following comparisons are illustrative: 



Blondie 
■Grand Ole Opry 

(Camel Cigarette 

segment) 
Dr. I. 0. 



City Rural 

50,000 & over Under 2.500 

15.11 17.28 

11.83 16.43 



9.70 



11.11 



But city ratings are significantly higher 
for the following shows: 

City Rural 

50,000 .v over I n.lcr 2,500 
Walter \\ inchell 20.80 9.89 

Inner Sam turn 17 04 11,32 

FBI in Peace and War 15.30 9.92 

Mr. District Attorney !0 J6 16.29 

There are, of course, other elements 
contributing to the bias; but the element 
of sophistication (which is closely involved 
with individual experience) is a major one 
and can be clearly discerned in the ex- 
amples chosen above. 

An approach to farm audiences, that has 
been employed infrequently but which is 
of great significance to advertisers inter- 
ested in reaching large rural audiences 
along with urban dialers, was used last 
January by producer Sherman Dryer on 
the American Broadcasting Company 
series Exploring the Unknown* (Sunday, 
7:30-8 p.m., sustaining) in a drama called 
Ghost River. 

The drama illustrates the technique of 
using tested entertainment forms like 
comedy, dramatic, or mystery sketches 
and their combinations to appeal to rural 
ears by using agricultural subject matter. 

Ghost River was the story of a young 
Veteran farmer and his wife who were 
threatened with loss of their crops and of 
their newly purchased farm because of 
choking weeds (the ghost river) they 
couldn't control. 

The crops were saved through the use of 
of a new chemical discovery (2, 4-D 
for short) so selective in its action that 
it killed the weeds without harming the 
corn. While listening to the human 
story of the young couple's struggle to 
save their farm, you learn about the new 
wonder chemical and when and how to 
use it. 

Nearly 15,000 farmers, gardeners, and 
just plain curious listeners wrote for the 
free booklet describing 2, 4-D. Ob- 
viously programs using such universal 
appeals, while still utilizing agricultural 
subject-matter, have an attraction to 
both urban and rural audiences. 

No less important than reaching the 

Now off the air 



desired farm audience is the manner in 
which the advertiser's selling message is 
presented to them. Network originations 
pose a special problem. 

But, let's look at what farm broad- 
casters with selling records have learned 
about reaching farmers. Their distilled 
experiences reveal principles that are a 
guide to better results. Intelligent appli- 
cation of their methods often can mean 
the difference between high and low 
cost selling. 

The sponsor's message must be related 
to the program (whether it's service or 
strictly entertainment). The commercial 
is related to the program — to the maxi- 
mum extent practicable — in the following 
three ways: 

1 . The Style, or Manner oj Presentation. 
Experience has taught the successful farm 
program announcer that a selling message 
delivered in the same general manner as 
that of the program content has a low 
psychological hazard to overcome. If 
talk precedes the sponsor's message, the 
listener is already conditioned to keep 
listening. A different style of presenting 
the commercial merely asks the listener to 
step out of his mental groove. 

It's for this reason that most farm pro- 
grams discourage transcribed announce- 



ments. WIBW (Topeka), one of the 
nation's premier farm stations, won't 
allow an e.t. announcement on the air 
until eight o'clock at night. General man- 
ager Ben Ludy discovered that "foreign" 
voices, not in the mood of the program, 
irritate his listeners. 

One study revealed that listeners in a 
certain instance remembered nothing 
about the first or last commercial, but re- 
membered the middle one exceptionally 
well. 

Why? 

The program was a dialogue between 
the station farm director and the County 
Agricultural Agent. The middle com- 
mercial was done as a dialogue between 
the farm director and his announcer in the 
same tone as the previous discussion. 

2. The Language of the Broadcast. 
Doing the commercial in the familiar 
terms the followers of a program are 
accustomed to hear from their farm 
counsellors and other friendly station 
voices seems ridiculously obvious. The 
same psychological factor works here as in 
the instance above — keeping listening 
easy by not changing signals on the 
listener. The audience doesn't always get 
this break (but the sponsor is the biggest 
loser). We'll come to the reasons shortly. 




^0£7^£AM NEW ^tWcWCCk 
MARKU 



MTTIG 

DOMINATES 

THE PROSPEROUS 

SOUTH*** NEW tHCVtVUfe 

JMADhTCY 

MWMMmm %. wQkmm 1 




Paul W. Morency, Vice-Pres — Gen. Mgr. • Waller Johnson, Asst. Gen. Mgr.— Sales Mgr. 
WTIC's 50,000 WATTS REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY WEED & CO. 



3 JANUARY 1949 



73 





"~~tfttwa/i 



WDSU 




W1j> WDSU broadcasis 5000 watt* 

^^->' from the French Quarter to 

the Gulf and South Louisiana listeners. 

From daily association with time-honored 
Sew Orlcam itisliiulioui WDSU has 
developed a high quality of integrity. 
WDSU devotes program time regularly 
and exclusively to the St. Louis Cathedral. 
the International House, Moisant Inter- 
national Airport, Tulanc University, 
Union Station, the Municipal Auditorium, 
Symphonies and Operas, 

\\ I isl ■. dominate Hoop- 
crating proves that hon- 
oring local institutions 
creates high listener 
loyalty. 



NEW 
ORLEANS 

1280 kc 



WDSU 



ABC 
Affiliate 

5000 
Wo 111 



WTIC (Hartford, Conn.) Farmer's Digest, 
is a typical apostle of this philosophy of 
talking the farmer's language in voicing 
the commercial. At the recent Eastern 
States Exposition, hundreds of farmers 
and their wives came to the Clark Equip- 
ment Company's booth especially, they 
told attendants, "to see the machinery 
Frank Atwood talks about." 

Clark, as a result of a special survey of 
sales attributable to Farmer's Digest, 
credits the program primarily with in- 
creasing the dollar volume of their busi' 
ness on certain equipment 100% over the 
previous period when they were not using 
radio. 

3. The Mood oj the Program. This is 
another follow-through on making it easy 
for prospects to maintain intensity of 
listening. If the commercial can't be 
logically linked with the dominant mood 
or tone of the program, it must contradict 
it as mildly as possible. 

A striking example of this idea in action 
is the w,i\ the institutional commercials 
for The San Diego Gas and Electric Com- 
pany are handled (SDG&E underwrites 
KSDJ's Home on the Ranch). The an- 
nouncer doing the commercials carries 
nver into his work the same quality of 
authority blended with friendly infor- 
mality and good will that characterizes 
the approach of Agricultural Director- 
Howard Kcddie, who does the program. 

Utilities, generally, don't have too good 
a name with farm people. To even appear 
to talk down or over their heads would be 
fatal to the desired public relations effect. 

SDG&E Advertising Manager Forrest 
Raymond explains that when they took 
the show in March of 1947 they were 
faced with the problem of not being able 
to supply electric service to the rural 
areas of San Diego as fast as the requests 
were coming in. There were, of course, 
legitimate reasons. Nevertheless, the 
company felt the serious need of a way to 
talk directly to rural people, and decided 
that by giving something • the program— 
they could ask for patience and under- 
standing for their own problems. 

The utility company now has the good 
will it sought, and continues to pay the 
bills for Home on the Ranch. 

Station farm editors frequently com- 
plain that commercial copy for farm pro- 
grams is too often written by someone 
who never wore a sweaty pair of overalls, 
or lubricated a pork production line. The 
sponsor or agency ma) and frequently 
does- insist their copy be read "as is." 
Nobody is quicker to detect a language 
that isn't his, than a farmer — and that's 
bad. For the sponsor, that is. 

Eighty per cent of the new wealth 



created each year in the United States- 
comes not from natural resources, not 
from industry, but from the products of 
Agriculture. Radio is a tremendous 
factor in all direct contacts with the 
people who create this wealth and are re- 
taining a sizeable share of it. A knowl- 
edge of what to look for in farm program- 
ing and how to make farm commercials 
do more work will give any farm sponsor 
an edge over rivals who fail to get the 
facts — and put them to work. * * * 



GLASS WAX 

{Continued from page 31) 

bine the full-page newspaper ads, the type 
that succeeded so well in Chicago, to open 
all markets. On a selective basis the> 
bought participations on programs with 
known selling records — on Arthur God- 
frey's early a.m. program in Washington 
and New York, on Lee Adams show in 
St. Louis, on Ruth Lyons program in Cin- 
cinnati, and on like women-appeal 
broadcasts in every market invaded. 

With this combination Glass Wax 
began to ride a tidal wave of success. 
Harold Schafer became, in the public eye r 
the modern Horatio Alger. Unlike many 
successful business men Schafer is ready, 
willing, and able to collect upon his 
phenomenal success. He knows how to 
handle himself at banquets and other 
types of public gatherings. When he 
isn't making public appearances, Ray 
Mithun of the agency is substituting for 
him, and Mithun is no slouch at turning 
the clever spoken phrase. Schafer looks 
the part of the Bismarck, North Dakota 
boy who made good. He's good copy and 
thousands of lines have been and are 
being written about his success. 

Only the Harris boys of Toni fame have 
competed with Schafer in the public rags- 
to-riches eye. Schafer is willing to admit 
that the dice have rolled well for him. He 
almost decided not to sell the product 
known today as Gold Seal Glass Wax. 
When L. R. Wallack, manager of special 
brands of the household division of the 
R. M. Hollingshead Corporation of Cam- 
den, New Jersey showed him the pink 
liquid, he said he wasn't interested in the 
product. He didn't think that a window 
cleaner offered a steady sales potential. 
He explains this b) sa) ing, "Out in North 
Dakota where I live, we don't have to 
clean windows very often." 

It w;'s onlv because Schafer couldn't 
sleep that night lie was at a local hotel), 
th.it he didn't miss placing his first order 
for the pink liquid that became Glass 
Wax. He has a tiemendous amount of 
energj , When he was still awake at 



74 



SPONSOR 



1 a.m. he decided to get up and work him- 
self tired. He thought the mirrors in his 
hotel room required cleaning so he tried 
the pink liquid on them. Then he de- 
cided to clean the windows, ash trays, 
floor lamps, bath tub, and the bedroom 
furniture. He became, to quote his own 
words, "deeply impressed." Since he was 
in the wax business he was still worried 
about taking on a non-wax product. He 
doodled on a sheet of paper. The product 
left a wax-like film that protected the sur- 
face. Naturally he wanted to justify 
handling the product so the name Glass 
Wax came to him. He even designed the 
■can (pink the same color as the product) 
and everything that very night and by 
four a.m. he was knocking on the door of 
Mr. Wallack's room and ordering two 
carloads. 

That's how the name Class Wax was 
born. The product first came on the 
market in the seven states where Gold 
Seal was building a wax business. The 
product is still manufactured by R. M. 
Hollingshead Corporation. However, 
whereas it was shipped to Bismarck orig- 
ina'Iy and orders filled out of that town, 
today it is warehoused throughout the 
U. S. and orders are filled from these 
bonded warehouse stocks. If Harold 
Schafer had been able to sleep that night 
he wouldn't be head of a multi million 
dollar operation today. 

There are other Glass Waxes on the 
market, despite the fact that it was a 
name that Schafer doodled. That's be- 
cause a Washington attorney decided to 
first register Gold Seal as trade mark 
rather than Gold Seal Glass Wax. Today 
the name is the subject of open hearings 
before the trade-mark commissioner in 
Washington. Among the firms fighting 
Gold Seal's application is not only the 
paint firm for whom he used to work in 
Bismarck, but the Johnson Wax firm in 
Racine. The latter hasn't a Glass Wax 
product in its line, but objects to the 
registration of any name which includes 
"wax" a6 part of its title. 

Another of the "objectors" to the Glass 
Wax registration is the firm that mer- 
chandises Waldorf Glass Wax. This is 
one of the enterprises of the fabulous 
Jacobs family who are said also to control 
B. B. Pen (ball point) company and many 
other big money-making corporations. 
Schafer doesn't feel that the other firms 
using the name Glass Wax hurt him too 
much. He gags when he sees the names of 
Sparkle Plenty Glass Wax, Flash Glass 
Wax or any of the other window waxes 
but there's nothing he can do about it 
until the final decision on the trade name 
is handed down. He also doesn't like to see 



the editorial advertising formula copied 
but there are almost as many firms copy- 
ing tlu- Glass Wax full-page newspaper 
ads as are copying the Glass Wax name. 
Schafer claims that he does just as well 
with Gold Seal Glass Wax in a market 
where one of the other Glass Waxes has 
preceded him. He just uses his legulai 
full-page newspaper formula and goes to 
work. However, selective radio has been 
replaced with Arthur Godfrey's daytime 
coast-to-coast program. Godfrey had 
done a top-flight job selling on a local 
basis so that when his daytime program, 



this past fall, was expanded to an hour, 
Gold Seal bought a 1 5-minute slice of it 
for Glass Wax and Godfrey's "wipe-it-on 
and wipe-it-off" chant has almost become 
a secondary trademark for the product. 

Gold Seal, late in invading the West 
Coast, doesn't depend upon Godfrey 
alone out there. They have the Saturday 
broadcast of Meet the Missus also selling 
Glass Wax. 

Schafer is a realist. Even if he thinks 
Godfrey is slightly terrific, when sales re- 
quire an extra push he doesn't hesitate to 
okay a second regional network program. 





"Baa, baa., black sheep, 

I law you any lunol? 
Yes sir, yes sir, three bags full 
One for my master, one for my dame. 
And one for the little boy 
that lives in the lane " 



And a "Bagful" for You, 

Mr. Advertiser! 

These days in Texas, the wool crop is measured by the carload, 
instead of bagfuls. Texas is first among the states in sheep raising 
and wool production. And most of the annual yield is produced 
in the WOAI Daytime Primary Area*. 

Add the cash return** from cattle, cotton, spinach a few more in 
which Texas is first — and you have bulging pocketbooks ready and 
waiting for WOAI -advertised products. 

In this prosperous territory, WOAI is the only single medium 
affording complete coverage. Think what that means in high 
homes per dollar low cost per sale and see your Petry man 
about availabilities, now. 

'BMB 50' ^ ■ 100% Counties 

'Nrt Farm Income S25S.821.000 
-\l 1'MK Surve) ..I Buyirfc Power 



WOAI 



'a*e 



NBO 50, OOO W.CLEAR CHANNEL -TON 



Represented by EDWARD PETRY i CO.. INC. - - New York. Chicago. Los Anjeles. Detroit. St Louis. Sin Francisco, Atlanta. Boston 



3 JANUARY 1949 



75 



KMLB 

KEY TO RICH 
NORTHEASTERN 
LOUISIANA 
MARKET 



• MONROE 
LOUISIANA 




FACTS- 

*KMLB serves a 223 million 
dollar market encompassing 
97,410 radio homes — all with- 
in KMLB's one milevolt con- 
tour. In area this includes 
17 parishes in northeastern 
Louisiana and 3 counties in 
Arkansas. 



*BMB report. 



5,000 WATTS DAY 
1,000 WATTS NIGHT 



AFFILIATED WITH 

American Broadcasting Company 



Represented by 

Taylor-Borroff & Company, Inc. 



Schafer also insists that one of the reasons 
win national advertising, printed as well 
as broadcast, is not as effective as most 
local advertising is that local advertising 
always plays up the price of the product 
and a definitive price is seldom part of 
national copy. 

Godfrey isn't shy in mentioning the 59c 
pint and the 98c quart price on every 
broadcast. The price is an important in- 
gredient in every black and white ad also. 
Godfrey is Schafer's kind of a salesman. 
He has made it very clear time and time 
again that he doesn't like to weasel word 
advertising copy. Only a short time ago, 
during a broadcast, Godfrey noticed that 
the tuba of a musician on the show didn't 
shine as he felt it should. So right during 
the program he insisted on polishing the 
tuba — with Glass Wax and telling the 
listening audience what he was doing. 
When you've something to sell — sell it — 
don't play around with fancy words is 
both Schafer's and Godfrey's advertising 
credo. 

Like most miracles, Glass Wax didn't 
just happen. It happened because the 
magician never dropped his wand when 
he landed on his face. Just because 
broadcasting didn't convince the big-city 
slickers (wholesalers) didn't mean that 
Schafer dropped it. He knew it sold the 
consumer. When he discovered that he 
needed newspapers to sell the middleman, 
he used newspapers. 

Business miracles are still compounded 
of part luck, part sweat, and part a will- 
ingness to accept the facts of advertising 
life. 

Gold Seal remains a Bismarck, North 
Dakota business. Its total employees 
number slightly less than 100. The rest 
of its sales ambassadors are tiny radio 
waves and little words printed on pulp 
and slick paper. 

And of course there's always Harold 
Schafer. * * * 



LAMENT 

(Continued from page 27) 

ing, but "we'd like a little class with our 
direct selling," is the wa\ one jobber puts 
his reaction. 

Wholesalers like dealer-cooperative 
advertising (where manufacturer and re- 
tailer share costs) just as long as the 
burden of selling the co-op deal doesn't 
fall upon them. Few- of them are willing 
to even check the broadcasts in ordei to 
okay the bills for the manufacturer. They 
feel th.it the burden oi selling ol anj co-op 
plan should be shouldered by the manu- 
facturer's detail men, the station sales 
staffs, or b\ the trans, ription and network 



WKNB 

Your Hartford ( ounty Station 

^—f-it noum c * 

tllC .//>/V< II I lit ill I sj- 

FORJOE & CO., Inc. 



., Motional 0<C.epieAe$tta.tive 

* 
SELL the complete 

HARTFORD 
NEW BRITAIN 

Market through 

WKNB 

The Clear Channel Station 
on 8-10 Kc's with 1000 Watts 

HARTFORD NEW BRITAIN 

1 1 Asylum Street 21 3 Main Street 



BILLION 

DOLLAR MARKET 

spread over two states 



Take our BMB Audience Cover- 
age Map, match it with the 
latest Sales Management "buying 
power" figures, and you'll see 
that KWFT reaches a billion and 
a half dollar market that spreads 
over two great states. A letter 
to us or our "reps" will bring 
you all the facts, as well as cur- 
rent availabilities. Write today. 



KWFT 



THE TEXAS-OKLAHOMA STATION 

Wichita Falli— 5.OO0 WatU— 620 KC— CBS 

Represented by Paul H. Raymer 

Co., and KWFT, 801 Tower 

Petroleum Bldg., Dallas 



76 



SPONSOR 



co-op program salesmen who tie into the 
deal. Many comment favorably on the 
thoroughness with which the traveling 
sales staffs of several of the transcription 
firms do their job. The Frederic Ziv, 
Transcription Sales Inc., and Lou Cowan's 
organization were particularly singled out 
for praise. Ziv makes a specialty of not 
going into a territory to sell a dealer- 
co-op plan until the wholesalers have been 
sold on the plan. Then and then only 
does the Ziv salesman go to work on the 
retailer direct. Having the blessing of the 
distributor helps the Ziv nationwide sales 
staff— but Ziv salesmen know in advance 
that any assist they are given by whole- 
sale salesmen is strictly unexpected and 
gravy. As a matter of record, most e.t. 
salesmen have discovered that when it 
comes to selling programs they have to be 
manufacturer, wholesaler, and station 
salesmen at the same time. 

Wholesalers are the first to admit that 
dealer co-op broadcasting deals are more 
often sold by network co-op departments* 
and transcription sales staffs than they 
are by any other group in radio. "After 
all since program producers stand to make 
the 'real' profit from the sale, they 
should bear theb urdenof the sales costs." 
Wholesalers are not generally impressed 
with the promotion efforts of broad- 
casters, individually or collectively. Ex- 
plained a Southern California auto ac- 
cessory jobber, "Newspapers, magazines 
and even billboards are promoted to us 
collectively. Nobody sells us radio, unless 
his own personal business is at stake. 
Stations try to sell us time, not as much as 
they should but they do every so often. 
Once in a great while, a network will pitch 
some promotion at us. Program pro- 
ducers will try to sell us on getting back 
of dealer-co-op plans, after they've sold 
the manufacturer. But nobody has ever 
been in to see us to sell broadcasting as 
an advertising medium. It's amazing to 
me that broadcast advertising has grown 
so great without promotion at the whole- 
salers' level. Eighty-five per cent of all 
consumer merchandise is middlemanned. 
To ignore us is bad business, I think." 

What this wholesaler didn't know was 
that until this year all the factors in 
broadcasting have failed to unite to do an 
industry promotion job. It has been 
every facet, network, station, for itself . . . 
and the devil take the hindmost. This 
wasn't too bad for the hindmost during 
the past six years because there seemed to 
be enough business for everyone. Whole- 
salers weren't neglected much more than 
top-flight policy men of great corpora- 



tions. On the one level that most other 
media have been able to work together 
(industry promotion) broadcasting has 
failed to do a creditable job. 

Wholesalers feel certain that agencies 
haven't the slightest idea of the middle- 
man's problems. At the drop of a hat 
they'll drag out a piece of promotion de- 
signed by an agency to prove that mer- 
chandising men at agencies live in a 
Madison Avenue world all their own. 

Advertising men in the wholesale field, 
and they are few and far between, explain 
that theirs is a thankless task. "Nobody 
loves a jobber, "stressed one jobber adman. 
"Nobody thinks that distribution is a 
necessary charge against product cost. 
There are a few wholesalers in the food 
field who have by private brands, built 
themselves into keystones in their field. 
They have done it through advertising. 
Many of them use radio. They have 
achieved importance through their pri- 
vate brands, and advertising. 

"Wholesalers are a facility whose im- 
portance is always underestimated. Some- 
day some manufacturer is going to build 
an advertising campaign on the air around 
his wholesalers and discover that a whole- 
saler can respond to kindness too," crystal- 
gazed the advertising executive. * * * 



Just What The 
Doctor Ordered 



«&> 



w 




MODERN HOME PHYSICIAN publisher* 
bought WDNC, the 3000 watts— 620 
kc CBS station In Durham, N. C. Results? 
1000 books sold per month! 

Whaf do you want to sell more 

of at lower cost? ^■■MH^B 

Bki DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 

The Herald-Sun Station 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Rep. Paul H. Raymer 



*E.rcepl NBC 



3 JANUARY 1949 



Yes 



KFYR 



550 KC 5000 WATTS 

NBC AFFILIATE 
BISMARCK, NO. DAKOTA 



comes in loud and clear in a larger area 
than any other station in the U. S. A. 




•ASK ANY JOHN BIAIR MAN TO PROVE IT 



77 



SPONSOR 
SPEAKS 



Bi-Weekly Sponsor 

With this issue sponsor becomes a 
biweekly (appearing every other Mon- 
day). But readers will note little differ- 
ence between this and previous issues of 
the one and only magazine published for 
buyers of broadcast advertising. That's 
not inertia. The industry in voting for 
the accelerated frequency of this publica- 
tion did so almost universally with one 
proviso — "but only if there is no change 
in format or objectives." 

That doesn't mean that sponsor will 
stand still. SPONSOR Reports is expand- 
ed. Selective Trends will alternate with 
TV Trends. TV Results is scheduled for 
every other issue. So is Contests and 
Offers. On the Hill will alternate with 
Outlook, a new analytical feature, report- 



Applause 



Department Stores 

It is several years after the National 
Association of Broadcasters decided to 
prove that radio could sell for department 
stores. It is however only in a few cases 
that the "Joske Plan," named after the 
department store in Texas which cooper- 
ated with the plan, has been put to use by 
broadcasters. Lee Hart of the NAB has 
made numerous appearances before retail 
groups but there's been very, very little 
action on the part of department stores. 

One transcription organization, in order 
to sell programs, to department stores, 
has virtually to insult the ad-managers 
and frequently does insult them to their 
faces. They're, by and large, black-and- 
white advertising men and have to be 
prodded hard to "take a chance" with a 
medium about which they know little. 

One factor that is ignored by depart- 



ing on things to come. The objective. 
the intensity of research, the what-makes- 
radio-tick formula, the news behind the 
news, the consistent debunking of puffery 
and sham attending many reports of ad- 
vertising's successes and failures, remain 
unchanged. The highly-pictorial, easy-to- 
read format continues. 

With each successive issue we expect to 
give added substance to sponsor's creed, 
published in its first issue: 
'STONSOR is the trade magazine for the 
man who foots the broadcasting advertising 
hill. As such, its objective is to do a job for 
the sponsor. That job as we see it boils 
down to this: 

to give the sponsor what he needs to under' 
stand and effectively use broadcasx advertis- 
ing in all hs forms — 

to sort out the four broadcast advertising 
mediums — AM, FM, TV, FAX — in their 
present'day perspective — 
to make every line of editorial content vital 
and vivid to the sponsor — 
to look at broadcasting advertising issues 
fairly, firmly, and constructively — 
to promote good broadcast advertising — 
advertising that is good for the sponsor and 
good for the listener. 

The "Canadian Broadcaster" Speaks 

"The campaign to remove the word 
'spot broadcast' from radio's vernacular 
and to supplant it with 'Selective Broad- 
casting,' which was sparked in Canada 
by three All-Canada men, Guy Herbert, 
John Tregale and Spence Caldwell, and 



merit store advertising men is that gener- 
ally speaking broadcast advertising has to 
be created by them that will in turn create, 
on the part of their customers, a listening 
habit. Once housewives realize that they 
can hear department store advertising 
news on a certain station at a certain 
hour, they listen, shop, and buy. 

The latest example of this is the habit 
developed by Ouellette's of Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire over stations WHEB- 
WFMI. The store had been using one 
daily ten-minute program at 10 a.m. and 
was about to cancel it and spend the 
money in black and white with all the 
rest of its budget. At this point the sta- 
tion executives were called in, remem- 
bered the "Joske Plan" and developed a 
"Junior Joske Plan" for the store. 

The store management liked the idea 
but warned the station that if it didn't 
produce, it meant zero business after a 
1 3 week test. The station went to work 



in the United States by Paul Raymer, 
started an industry-wide and inter- 
national debate which seems to be bearing 
fruit. 

"Sponsor, an American Broadcasting 
magazine, announced a contest in its 
August issue, in an attempt to supplant 
the offending' 'spot' with 'a better word 
The entries rolled in, including such 
brain-waves as 'Bucksot Radio,' 'Air- 
blurb,' 'Pinhead Programming' and 
'Tellvertisement.' There were 1931 

suggestions in all, and the judges brought 
it right back to where Messrs. Herbert, 
Tregale, Caldwell and Raymer had 
started, when they announced the winner 
—'National Selective,' with six runners- 
up suggesting 'Selective.' 

"There has been some passive resist- 
ance and not a little nonchalance, but 
all in all the industry seems to go along 
with the idea that "spot broadcast" and 
"spot announcement," with entirely dif- 
ferent meanings, cannot fail to confuse 
laymen, and still worse, time buyers, 
besides displaying a vocabularic defi- 
ciency which seems out of place in radio. 

"This paper, though lacking the courage 
of its contemporary, sponsor, in sum- 
marily rewriting the dictionary to suit 
the convenience of its advertisers, bows 
to popular demand, and, henceforth will 
discard the misleading "spot," in favor 
of the slightly more cumbersome but 
nevertheless more explicit — Selective 
Broadcasting." — Canadian Broadcaster. 



and promoted the plan which involved 
different programs at different times of 
the day to reach different segments of the 
store's customers. The plan has been re- 
newed and the store has reversed a down- 
ward sales curve through radio. The sta- 
tion had to work to develop the listening 
habit. It didn't just happen. 

Broadcast advertising can and does 
produce sales for department stores or any 
form of retail or manufacturing activity. 
It seldom produces unless it's promoted. 

Despite the thousands of advertisers 
using broadcasting it continues to be 
amazing that so few have learned that it 
has to be fed promotion- that the con- 
sumer has to be given something to make 
her develop the listening habit. 

Wilfred Phaneuf and Frank Welch, 
owners of Ouellette's, together with 
WHEB-WFMI are jointly finding out 
how well the magic of the airlanes works— 
when it's worked with. 



78 



SPONSOR 




easy for a radio station 
to say, "Advertising will solve 
your problems. Just buy some time on the air." 

It's easy to say, but it isn't always true. For 
advertising can be really effective only when 
product and package are right— distribution 
healthy— selling appeal sound. 

This fact is acknowledged at WLW, and 
service is geared to meet the issue squarely. There 
are facilities— not found at any other radio sta- 
tion—to aid a manufacturer all along the line. 
There is a "know how" peculiar to the area, and 
man power adequate to help you reach a position 
where advertising can really do a solid job. 

HERE'S AN EXAMPLE:* 

In 1943, the manufacturer of a proprietary doing 
only a negligible business in the WLW area, 
approached the station in regard to a radio cam- 
paign. Upon our advice, he first signed with 
WLW's Specialty Sales division to obtain distri- 
bution. He then began his WLW campaign, 
sponsoring three early-morning quarter-hours per 
week, using WLW's staff rural entertainers. 

During the last five years, this advertiser has 
been a steady, year-around advertiser on WLW's 
early-morning schedule— is now sponsoring seven 
quarter-hours per week— and has engaged the 
services of Specialty Sales eight different times. 

WLW's Drug Merchandising Department has 
also given full support to this client, in the 



matter of checks upon distribution and competi- 
tive position, dealer and consumer attitudes, the 
design and distribution of display material, etc. 

The result? Sales have increased steadily in the 
WLW 4-State area — have now reached a total 
more than thirty times greater than when the 
advertiser began his WLW campaign in 1943. 
And he has used no other media in this area. 

Yes, The Nation's Station can help you solve 
your selling problem in many, many ways. And 
when you have solved it for WLW-land, you 
pretty well know the answers for the nation. For 
WLW's Merchandise-Able Area is a true cross 
section of America. A vast territory where almost 
fourteen million people live— an area which is 
covered by one station as a network covers the 
nation. An ideal proving ground for products 
and ideas. A proving ground for success. 

'■'Same on reqitt si 




THE NATIONS MOST MERCHANDISE-ABLE STATION 




BASIC 

ABC Network 



CLEVELAND 



850 KC 

5000 Watts 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY HEADLEY-REEO COMPANY 



17 JANUARY 1949 • $8.00 a Year 






RFPE1VED 

How a transcription is made— p. 27 

JAN 18 1949 Radio directors' lament— p. 37 

i B CGENERAi%l^ twork P r °S ram Comparagraph-p. 47 

Who uses radio locally?— P. 32 



Barney: suit and cloaker ace of the radio saturation technique — p. 19 









First it was... 



WABD 



NEW YORK'S WINDOW ON THE WORLD 



NEXT if was... 



WTTG 



WASHINGTON'S WINDOW ON THE WORLD 



AND NOW its 






• • • 



WDTV 

PITTSBURGH S WINDOW ON THE WORLD 



Pioneer station linking the East Coast and Mid-West networks! 

All Owned and Operated by 




TELEVISION NETWORK 



DU MONT TELEVISION NETWORK, 515 MADISON AVENUE, NEW YORK CITY 





TS.. .SPONSOR REPORTS. . 



NETWORK TV- 
UNION PEACE TO 
BE SHATTERED 



INCREASED BIZ, 
LOWERED PROFITS 
FOR ALL FOUR 
NETWORKS 



"SLANTED" 
BLAMED ON 
SPONSORS 



NEWS 



..SPONSOR REPORT 



PUBLIC AND 
MILTON DIAMOND 
BROUGHT AFM- 
RADIO PEACE 

TV SPONSOR 
LIST PASSES 
2,000 MARK 



HEIDT'S FIRST 
RATING BETTER 
THAN EXPECTED 



HIT TUNES 
CONTINUE AVAIL- 
ABLE FOR DECADE 



PERSONALITY MORE 
IMPORTANT THAN 
PRODUCTION : IN TV 



17 January 1949 

Quiet union situation in television will be shattered by strike at 
major network within next few months. Efforts are being made to 
avoid strike spreading to entire TV broadcast industry but no one is 
certain conflagration can be contained at one web. 

-SR- 
All four networks report increased business for 1948 and all four 
chains will also report lower net earnings for period. While webs 
will plow millions into TV in 1949, losses from visual medium will 
not be as great as they were in 1948. 

-SR- 
Whereas only 7% of newspaper readers, who claim newspapers are "un- 
fair" in reporting news, attribute "unfairness" to advertisers, 32% 
of those who question radio's "fairness" blame advertisers. Listen- 
ers need education on broadcast news accuracy and "fairness." This 
is part of conclusions of latest National Opinion Research study. 

-SR- 
While practically everyone has claimed credit for the Petrillo music 
peace in radio and TV, and AFM attorney Milton Diamond is really de- 
serving of most applause, it was really public's lack of interest in 
live music sans disks that brought about resumption of recording. 

-SR- 
Over 2,000 advertisers are currently using TV to sell wares. They 
range from 20-second announcement sponsors to full-hour play under- 
writers and presenters of full evenings of sport. Results continue 
to pile in (see "TV Results" in alternate issues of SPONSOR). 

-SR- 
Horace Heidt's initial rating on NBC of 11.7 against Jack Benny on 
CBS of 27.8 was several points higher than anticipated, considering 
tremendous Benny "breaks" that appeared in newspapers week before 
first program. Most critics feel that Benny will have to present 
better programs to keep 27.8 standing. 

-SR- 
ASCAP music (and this still includes the majority of hit tunes) will 
continue available to sponsors at no increase in royalty rates over 
past seven years. Extension of contract between licensing group and 
broadcast industry is for another decade. 

-SR- 
Arthur Godfrey is proof that personality continues more important 
than any entertainment formula or technique. Godfrey, without the 
slightest semblance of TV production, is number two Hooper- and 
Pulse-rated program on visual air. Just telecasting Godfrey's 
"Talent Scouts" program is enough to make viewers look in. 



SPO \SOH. 
iat 



iOR, Vol. J, iVo. i, I / January (949. Published biweekly by Sponsor Publications Inc. Publication offices: 5800 V. \iarvine St., Philadelphia it. Pa. Advertising, Editor 
, and Circulation offices. W W. 5'1 St.. \'ew York 19. V. Y. Xccptance under the act if June 5. I93'i at Phualelphia. Pennsylvania, authorized December 2. 19'i7 



17 JANUARY 1949 



REPORTS.. .SPONSOR RE PORTS. .. SPONSOR RE 



STATIONS ON WAR 
PATH ON BMB 
COVERAGE REPORTS 



RANGE OF COST- 

PER-LISTENER 

REPORTED 



NO GIVE-AWAY 
PROGRAM IN 
PULSE TOP TEN 



Pressure currently being put on Broadcast Measurement Bureau (BMB) 
is terrific. Stations resent salaries being paid top management of 
industry research organization and plans for more definite figures 
which are in BMB works. As long as figures don't point finger too 
closely, station managements don't object to paying for research in- 
formation that often doesn't help them. When formula is developed 
that actually may take business away from them, the yell is loud and 
furious. BMB President Feltis is having tougher fight on his hands 
than he had when he first sold industry on organization. Sponsors 
and agencies are generally pro-BMB. They don't have to pay for it. 

-SR- 

Art Nielsen reported to Radio Writers Guild in Chicago, range of 
cost-per-listener being paid by sponsors. Highest cost was 1J^ 
cents per listener and lowest l/34th of a cent. 

-SR- 

Give-away programs disappeared from network programs November- 
December rated among "top ten" by Pulse in five cities in which 
Pulse is currently reporting program listening (Boston, Chicago, 
Cincinnati, New York and Philadelphia). Pulse's "top ten" starts 
with Lux Theatre and concludes with "Inner Sanctum." 



COLGATE LEADS 
TOOTHPASTE 
U.'S. SALES 



TRANSITRADIO 
AND STORECASTING 
ATTACKED 



wpix eased 
out of tv web 
operation" 



-SR- 

Colgate Toothpaste is number one tooth scrubber in U. S. It's only 
Colgate-Palmolive-Peet product that leads its field. Stepped-up 
campaigns by contenders for number-one slot are planned for 1949. 

-SR- 

Attacks on transitradio and storecasting, two important parts of 
future FM station operation, are appearing or are scheduled to ap- 
pear in newspapers and some trade journals. Tenor of negative re- 
ports is that transit riders and store shoppers don't listen. This 
has been researched as being untrue. 

-SR- 

Pressure persuaded station WPIX to wait until AT&T had more than one 
coaxial cable available before starting a network operation. Shar- 
ing one cable between five originating stations was more than four 
regular TV networks could take. Station will be in there battli ng, 
come April. 

-SR- 



WINDY CITY 
TV EXECUTIVES 
FEEL IGNORED 



Chicago TV executives are furious at way they are being ignored by 
agencies and their own network officials in New York. Hope that 
Windy City would regain some of program origination power it held 
years ago seems faint now, but Chicago pioneer TV station and pro- 
gram men feel that quality of picture will be better, etc., when fed 
out of Midwest. 

SPONSOR 



INTERMOUNTAIN 
NETWORK OFFERS 

EVEN MORE 

FOR '49 

All within the past year, the Intermountain Network has added 4 new 
stations and further improved the facilities of 7 more stations. And 
there has been no increase in rate. 

So, for '49, you can buy 20 stations for intensive coverage of the 
intermountain west. Or, if you prefer, you can buy single groups exactly 
as you wish. 




20 HOME TOWN 

MARKETS COMPRISE 

THE 

INTERMOUNTAIN 

NETWORK 

UTAH 
KAIL, Salt Lake City 
KLO, Ogden 
KOVO, Provo 
KOAL, Price 
KVNU, Logan 
KSVC. Richfield 

IDAHO 
KFXD, Boise-Nampa 
KFXD-FM, Boise-Nampa 
KVMV, Twin Falls 
KEYY, Pocatello 
KID. Idaho Falls 

WYOMING 
KVRS, Rock Springs 
KOWB, Laramie 
KDFN, Casper 
KWYO, Sheridan 
KPOW, Powell 

MONTANA 
KBMY, Billings 
KRJF, Miles City 
KMON, Great Falls 
KYES, Butte * 

NEVADA 
KRAM. Las Vegas 

KALL 

of Salt Lake City 

Key Station 

of the 

Intermountain 

Network 

and it* 

MBS Affiliates 

* Under Construction 



17 JANUARY 1949 



Note the changes during the past year: 

More Power, Better Frequencies 



Station 

KOVO 

KVNU 

KFXD 

KVRS 

KWYO 

KPOW 

KLO 



KMON 
KRAM 
KSVC 
KOWB 



City State Formerly NOW 

Provo, Utah 250 watts, 1240 KC 1000 watts, 960 KC 

Logan, Utah 250 watts, 1230 KC 1000 watts. 610 KC 

Nampa-Boiie, Idaho 250 watts, 1230 KC 1000 watts, 580 KC 

Rock Springs, Wyo. 250 watts, 1400 KC 1000 watts, 1360 KC 

Sheridan, Wyo. 250 watts, 1400 KC 1000 watts, 1410 KC 

Powell, Wyo. 250 watts, 1230 KC 1000 watts, 1260 KC 

Ogden, Utah— Now operating with 5000 watts, plus directionaliied power— 
a signal equivalent to 16,000 watts of power. 



New Additions 



Great Falls, Mont, 
las Vegas, Nevada 
Richfield, Utah 
Laramie, Wyo. 



5000 watts 560 KC 

1000 watts 920 KC 

1000 watts 690 KC 

250 watts 1340 KC 



THE 



INTERMOUNTAIN 
NETWORK Inc. 




V^fk — Chlcog* — 



o Inc. National Representatives 

Us Angeles — Son Frond see — 






^o 



\\U 



\1 



WfM 



\W 



SPONSOR REPORTS 

40 WEST 52ND 

OUTLOOK 

MR. SPONSOR: WILLIAM HELBEIN 

NEW AND RENEW 

PS. 

SUIT AND CLOAKERS 

BOOSTING THE SPONSOR VIA TV 

FARM RESEARCH 

SELLING FURNITURE IN CANADA 

A TRANSCRIPTION IS MADE 

WHO USES RADIO LOCALLY? 

TV TRENDS 

RADIO DIRECTORS' LAMENT 

TV PROGRAM COMPARAGRAPH 

MR. SPONSOR ASKS 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 

APPLAUSE 




1 
4 
6 
8 
13 
15 
19 
22 
24 
26 
27 
32 
34 
36 
47 
52 
62 
62 



Published evcr> other Mondaj bj SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

i tonal, :• i j ■ I Advertising I >fl>" W W i 1 62 

. I 

300 N M nue. Telephone: Financial 1556. Publica- 

. irtfa Marvini Street, Philadelphia -11. Pa 

i mt. (I -I:,-, j- i ■ ar, I anada $^' Single 

50c Printed in I fi A Copyright 1949 sponsor 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 

i mill Publisher: Norman H Glenn. 

1 i nc * .nifxr Glenn I M Kw nlei 

■ ink Bannister, Charles Sinclair, Jami I 
i.. .,. , \ r > Director: Howard W 
\dverti U tcr J. Blumenthal. Advertising Dc- 

■ M II. LcBlang; I nnJr.; 

I,. Vngi i Duncan A Scotl A- Co., 44* S, 11,11 Strci 

a i ., . Milk Bldg. Circulation 
Manager: Milton K 

COV1 R PI( 1 1 RJ ' Ban 

ting can build a men's clothing business. His 
- gcnd of advertising. 



40 West 52nd 



AWARDS 

One of our clients lias asked us to secure 
for them certain information relative to 
annual awards that are awarded by differ- 
ent associations and publications. 

We would like to secure a list by name 
of the different awards that are made each 
year to radio stations, and for what these 
awards are given and what must be done 
to be eligible to qualify for these different 
awards. 

Sheldon A. Kaufman 
Director, Media & Research 
Allen & Reynolds, Omaha, Neb. 

► SPONSOR'S May 1"»48 Issue with report on 
awards for broadcasting has heen sent Mr. 
Kaufman. 



AGENCY "CRYING RAGS" 

A letter in your December 1948 issue, 
written by Hal Davis, Publicity Diiector, 
Kenyon & Eckhardt, places all the crying 
rags in the agency comer. We take issue 
with Mr. Davis as KOTA, 5,000-watt 
CBS affiliate, Rapid City, South Dakota, 
does cooperate to its fullest extent in all 
promotion, both national and local, when 
merchandising material is on hand. 

Merchandising material, as far as we're 
concerned, includes 8 x 10 glossy photo- 
graphs, posters, recorded transcriptions, 
program data mailed to KOTA listeners, 
plus live spot announcements. 

A reorganization here in the Promotion 
and Merchandising Department assures 
any agency, broadcaster, or time buyer of 
continued and accurate information re- 
garding promotion of their program. 

Though the problem (?) is important it 
is certainly not a knotty problem. 
Jack B. Wettstein 
Director of Merchandising 
KOTA, KOTA-FM 
Rapid City, S. D. 



EXPLANATION? 

NAB's "Dealer Cooperative Radio Ad- 
vertising" booklet made no attempt to 
tell the complete story of dealer coopera- 
tive advertising. In the first place, this 
research was done earlier this year at a 
time when literally hundreds of new 
dealer-co-op plans were just beginning to 
come into being. In the second place, 1 
don't believe there is any "actual count" 
of such arrangements since there must be 
hundreds of strictly local and regional 

(Please turn to page 9) 



Your Sales 
in Houston 

will Match 
this Index 

WHEN 
YOU USE 




N THE 
SOUTH'S FIRST MARKET 



All "vital statistics" 
show that Houston and its 
great Gulf Coast market 
are growing lustily. 

Department store sales 
are up 23'/ for the first 
1 1 months — tops among 
Texas cities. Building per- 
mits for 1 1 months jumped 
from $65,080,064 in 1947 
to $92,273,372 in 1948. 
Harris County population 
increased from 740,000 to 
780,000. 

To sell Houston and the 
Gulf Coast, buy KPRC — 
FIRST IN EVERYTHING 
THAT COUNTS. 

*^ HOUSTON 

950 KILOCYCLES • 5000 WATTS 

NBC and TON on the Gulf Coatt 

Jack Harris, Manager 

Nationally Represented by Edward Petry & Co. 




. LTHOL'GH we must a<iim! that sardines are a 
mite more numerous than ABC fans in Monterey, BMB 
shows that ABC's net hauls in a prize eateh of 83% of 
the radio families there. In two-thirrls of the 69 Coast 
towns studied by BMB, at least 50% of the radio families 
tune regularly to ABC. 




HK O, where a $4,000,000 almond crop keeps 
eash registers busy, is nuts about us. too. According to 
BMB, 64% of Chieo"s radio families tune to ABC regu- 
larly. ABC's big-time shows, boomed bv promotion show- 
manship, dominate audiences outside the big urban 
areas as well as inside. 




B 



\KKRSFIELD is chock-full of oil wells and \l'>< 
listeners. 81% of the radio families in this California 
petroleum center are regular ABC tans. 1 |> and down 
the Coast. ABC reaches 95% of all radio families at the 
50% BMB penetration level. It's your top combination 
of coverage, low cost, and high ratings. 

On the coast you cant get away from 

ABC 

FULL COVERAGE . . . ABC's improved facilities ha\ e 
boosted its coverage to 95.4% of ALL Pacific Coast radio 
families I representing 95% of coast retail sales) in coun- 
ties where BMB penetration is 50% or better. 

[IMPROVED FACILITIES... ABC, the Coast's Most Pow- 
erful Network, now delivers 227,750 watts of power- 
5 1.250 more than the ne\t most powerful net work. This 
includes Koi h 50.000 waiters, twice ;i> main as an) 
other coast net work... a 31% increase in facilities during 
the past year. 

GREATER FLEXIBILITY... You can focus your sales 
impact better on ABC Pacific. Buy as few as 5 station-. 
or as many as 21— all strategically located. 

LOW ER COST. . . ABC brings yon all this at a cosl per 
thousand radio families as low as or lower than an) other 
Pacific Network. \o wonder we say— whether \ on re on 
a Coast network or intend to be. talk to AI!< 

THE TREND TO ABC... The Richfield Reporter, oldest 
newscast on the Pacific Coast, moves to ABC after 17 
years on another network, and so does Greyhound's 

Sundav Coast show— after 13 \ear- on another network. 



ABC 



PACIFIC NETWORK 

\t« Yobm 30 It- k< i. II. i Plan • < I.. I. J 5700 -Dmon I TOO Stroll BIdg. ■ CHerr) 8321— Chicago: JO V « ... k. r Ur. 
l)Klai>nr<- 1900— I "s Ajxcfi.es: 6363 Sun«et Blvd. ■ III . I. on 2-31 H— Sa\ Khancisco: ISj M 



17 JANUARY 1949 



Outlook 



10 Billion More Cigarettes to Burn in '49 

Experts in the tobacco field foresee another 3% increase in 
sale of cigarettes for 1949. Figures just released for 1948 
consumption indicate that it passed 380,000,000,000 cigar- 
ettes, an increase of 10,000,000,000 over 1947. Big radio 
advertisers shared the bulk of the smoking increase. Biggest 
brand increase was Camels, with sales upped 3,000,000,000. 
Leader is still Lucky Strike which added 2,000,000,000 to its 
cigarette sale to reach an all-time high of 107,000,000,000. 
Both Chesterfield and Philip Morris added 1,000,000,000 
smokes to sales. Increased smoking among the older group 
and women is said will account for the expected 1949 new 
high. The cigarette business at the manufacturer's level is a 
$2,000,000,000 industry. 

Meager Movie Earnings Will Continue 

Reason for motion picture industry's great interest in TV 
can be traced to current earning picture of the screen business. 
Every big screen organization's net in 1948 was way under 
what it was in '47. The decrease ranges from around 10-14' , 
for 20th Century-Fox to 80 90 r ; for Columbia Pictures. 
Nets will continue down in 1949, although write-off of big 
picture costs may help the financial statements this year. 

Auto Dealers to Patronize Own Ad Agencies 

Control of automotive dealers' advertising allowances by the 
home offices of the automotive companies is causing consider- 
able unrest among dealers. More and more associations of 
dealers will break away from parent organization's adver- 
tising agency and start spending "their own money." Re- 
straint of trade action is contemplated by one local dealer 
group. Others are just talking tough. Action is being speeded 
by a number of agencies that would like some of the auto- 
motive coin at present controlled by a few big agencies 

Rising Operating Costs Hit Stations 

Despite TV's growing importance, several large radio stations 
throughout the U.S. will have to increase their rates. This 
will be balanced by a number of smaller stations cutting their 
rate schedules in order to increase billings. Increased cost of 
doing business will be the motivating reason in both moves. 
During 1948, broadcast station operating costs rose on an 
average of 10',, with some stations finding that they had 
jumped 40' ', . A few were able to hold the line but there will 
be little opportunity for them to do SO in 1949. 

"Room-size" TV Screens This Year 

i of television sits will go up during 1949. There will be 
low-price receivers but they'll be just that — TV sets that 
have been built to a price and which will be minus top voice 
and picture quality. TV receiver with "rcxim-size screens" 
will generally be priced at $500. 



Insurance Companies Copy Government Policy Plans 

Insurance lobby, it now appears, will be able to defeat Truman's 
compulsory health insurance this year. One result of H.S.T.'s 
campaign for governmental insurance will be the issuance of 
new policies by private companies. These will incorporate 
many of the suggested government policy's features. New 
policies will be air advertised widely when H.S.T.'s bill goes 
down to defeat. To avoid unfavorable public relations, no 
advertising will be done on the new form of private health 
insurance until after Congress has considered the health bill. 

"Preem" Kick-back for G.l.'s 

Disbursement of G.I. insurance premiums during the latter 
half of this year will reach nearly $3,000,000,000. This will 
materially retard the downward consumer-buying trend and 
help retail business which will be crying wolf by that time. 

Fruit Canners to Move Stocks by Selective Radio 

Canners and canned fruit distributors will turn to selective 
broadcast advertising to move the tremendous quantity of 
canned goods that have piled up in warehouses during the 
past four months. Present wholesale inventory is twice what 
it was a year ago, with consumer buying of more expensive 
items running about 18^ behind 1948. Successful use of 
selective broadcasting by Birdseye frozen fruits last fall has 
indicated to fruit men that radio can move specially priced 
foods. 

U. S. Industry Migrating to Puerto Rico 

Rush to establish factories in Puerto Rico has grown to land- 
slide proportions. Long-term tax exemption provision and 
low-cost labor for new businesses are very inviting to many 
fabricators of products requiring many man hours and an 
unchanging semi-tropical climate. Recent decision of the 
government not to compete with privately-owned commercial 
broadcasting stations has also helped many big corporations 
make up their minds to move. Fear of possible governmental 
intetference held back some big companies which now feel 
"safe." Puerto Rico will receive plenty of public relations 
broadcast time in the States, and is even considering buying 
time to sell the "tropical U.S. isle." 

Union Hopes for Own Radio Stations Fade 

Yen of a number of unions to own their own broadcasting 
stations and to operate them as regular commercial radio 
outlets is beginning to peter out. Fact that FM, the finest 
type of aural broadcasting, just hasn't made the commercial 
grade, added to a number of licensees turning back their con- 
struction permits for AM stations, is causing a number of 
Utopia-minded labor unions to look at their bankbooks. 

No 100% Removal of Taft-Hartley Restraints 

There will be no relaxation of many of the Taft-Hartley labor 
regulations despite the forthcoming so-called repeal ot the 
act. Unions will not re win the 100' , freedom of action they 
had under the Wagner Act. Fight of AFL and CIO for com- 
plete repeal of T-H bill is window dressing for memberships. 
Time will be bought by unions to sell "repeal" of act if Con- 
mess appears to ignore too many of labor's demands. 



SPONSOR 







ap Reprinted Courtes/ or 

LOOK 

December 7, 1948 





ol „,^»' A " < '- . ..op*." 5 - 50 " .,.. 

—*— ^"i— -^T-- 

, u eC aose * r North te 

c\eorer - 









f 1 £:- ; — 



17 JANUARY 1949 



for profitable 
setting - 

I NVESTIGATE 



VH>tf* 



VJW- 









pt^ 



Ft*****- ^ 



Represented by 

^H ROBERT MEEKER 

^ /jg ASSOCIATES 

New YorW • Chicago 

Son Francisco • Los Angeles 



Clair R. McCollough 
Monoging Dirtcfor 

STEINMAN STATIONS 




Mr. Sponsor 



William Holbein 

President 
Helbros Watch Company, New York 



Thirty-five years in the watch business, and still a "nine-torn idnight 
guy," William Helbein is the type of executive who can be found in his 
shipping room almost as often as in his office. His propensity for running 
things is reflected in the direct, single-minded approach to broadcast ad- 
vertising of his product. While most of his competitors employ selective 
announcements, chain breaks and time signals for radio selling, Helbein 
has used a single weekly half-hour program for five years, with direct 
results in the form of materially increased sales each year. 

Of an estimated over-all annual advertising budget of $600,000, about 
91%, or roughly $530,000, is spent for the Helbros show, Quick As a Flash, 
heard over Mutual at 5 :30-6.-00 Sunday afternoons. The number of MBS 
stations now carrying the program (415) is a far cry from the 28 over 
which Helbros first broke into network advertising on 18 January N44. 

The watch company*s radio history has been relatively uninvolved, 
marked as it is by only one important change in format since its inception 
When Helbros made its debut on the air its program featured the black- 
face comedians Pick and Pat. Six months later, in July of N44. they were 
replaced by Quick As a Flash, an audience participation give-away show 
and a pioneer in that now heavily populated field. 

Helbein 's shrewd knowledge of radio values was demonstrated last 
Spring when he was approached by NBC to air his program over that 
network at an earlier time Sunday afternoons, the bait being the promise 
of a "new" audience and more listeners per dollar. The additional cost of 
using the senior network was not the sole factor that decided Helbein to 
remain with Mutual. He wisely realized that he had one of the choicest 
time spots on MBS. \\ ith Quick As a Flash on the air at an hour when that 
network dominates the Sunday radio scene, due to the wide mystery 
audience. The Shadow immediately precedes the Helbros show. 

Helbein 's predilection for traveling, which before the war took him to 
Geneva. Switzerland, the watch capital of the world, five times ever) 
year, finds him jumping around the U. S., checking his sales outlets. He 
never makes a trip without also checking on the impact and sales results 
of his program in the territories he visits. He knows that Quick As a 
Flash sells Helbros watches. 



•Sn-n [Ml) inlh Ed h,J«,k Pmidml of \f/l> 



SPONSOR 



40 West 52nd 



(Continued from page 4) 

operations of this sort which could hardl) 

be uncovered. 

All we tried to do in this booklet was 
report the experience of many of our 
member stations as a means of dramatiz- 
ing the great potential represented by this 
type of advertising. We went one step 
further and described some of the tech- 
niques of seeking, selling, and handling 
dealer-cooperative advertising. Our re- 
search facilities just don't permit the ex- 
haustive and expensive study that would 
be necessary to produce anything like a 
complete report on dealer-co-op advertis- 
ing. As a matter of fact, such a report 
would probably be out of date by the 
time the research was completed, and it 
would have to be revised almost daily in 
order to make it entirely correct. 

We are satisfied with our booklet if it 
has had the effect of making radio sales- 
men conscious of the possibility of obtain- 
ing manufacturers' support in all cases 
where a local retailer has branded mer- 
chandise on his shelves. Don't forget 
that there are many other forms of co-op 
besides a 50 50 split on the cost of adver- 
tising. Some manufacturers who just 
won't contribute anything to the cost of 
radio advertising, nevertheless exert a 
strong influence on their retailers which 
often results in their decision to take ad- 
vantage of radio advertising. 

M. B. Mitchell 

Director 

Broadcast Advertising 

NAB, Washington, D. C. 



STORECASTING 

As far as I am concerned, this article 
(on Storecasting) is just another one in 
the long line of sound, thorough, and 
authentic pieces that are a good habit 
with your book. 

Stanley Joseloff 

President 

Storecast Corporation of America 

New York 



ANNOUNCEMENT SOURCE 

Can you supply us with the address of 
Kent & Johnson and any other writers 
and composers who specialize in creation 
and production of spot announcement? 
W. J. Henderson 
L. W. Ramsey 
Davenport, Iowa 
^ Names and addresses have been sent. 




the first television station 



in the Mid-South • . . 



■ Witn pardonable pride we point 
to the fine Television job VVMCT 
is doing for its clients. One good 
reason: A staff of sixty working 
with the finest equipment avail- 
able. VVMCT is completely 
staffed, completely equipped for 
any assignment. For instance, our 
new RCA Mobile Unit complete with Micro-wave relay . . . 



■Or take our studio and trans- 
mitting equipment — all RCA — 
the finest money can buy! Movie 
equipment is Bell & Howell, East- 
man, and Auricon for sound with 
movies; Houston rapid film proc- 
essor, and Bell & Howell printer, 
with a complete staff of produc- 
tion specialists to get the job done. 



■ In addition to one studio 28 
by 34 feet, WMCT has a spacious 
auditorium seating 1,050 people 
with dressing rooms, scenery stor- 
age — the works! Our program 
library is replete with up-to-the- 
minute program material, and we 
are completely equipped to handle coverage of local events. 



■ What about sets? Are people 
buying them? You bet they are! 
The question is: How long will 
suppliers be able to meet the de- 
mand? We tell you all this, be- 
cause it may be that you are one 
of the aggressive advertisers who 
capitalize on the terrific impact 
of a new medium in the $2,000,000,000 Memphis market. 







WMCWMCF.WMCT 



National Representatives 

The Branham Company 



Owned and operated by the Commercial Appeal 
CHANNEL 4 • MEMPHIS 

AFFILIATED WITH NBC CBS DUMONT 



17 JANUARY 1949 



HOW TO MEASURE A NETWORK 



As radio has grown, so have the techniques oi measuring a 
network's advert ising efficiency . . . 

And with each refinement ol survey technique, NBC's No. 1 
position in radio becomes more impressive: 

More total audience— a weekly total oi 3,700,000 more radio 
families in the evening than any other network. 2,900,000 more 
in the daytime, bmb -adjusted to dam 

More average audience — On a national basis, the average sponsored 
evening program on NBC attracts a 44% larger audience 
than on any other network. In the daytime, NBC's audience 
advantage is 22%. u s hooperatincs 

More popular programs — In spite of numerous program shifts 
throughout the years, NBC continues to have the largest 
number of the most popular programs on the air. The present 

SCOre — 15 of the first 25. Program Hooperatincs- December 15-21 

More advertising dollars— Advertisers in 1948 spent over 
seven million dollars more for facilities on NBC than on any 
other network, basedon pib 

More advertising efficiency— Using both time and talent costs. 
NBC delivers 1 1 % more homes per dollar than any other network 
in the daytime and 10% more in the evening, u s hooperatincs 

Such arc the proportions of... 



NBC... America's No.1 Network §31 

The National Broadcasting Company— a service of Radio Corporation 0) America 



"~ 



«J£fi39^ 







George Gow, KFH News Commentator, is 
THE radio news authority in Kansas. He is on 
the air three times daily; noon, early evening 
and at 10.00 P.M., six times weekly. His terrific 
popularity is borne out by his phenomenal 
Hooper ratings and as you can see above Kill 
and George Gow have almost as many listen- 
ers as the other three Wichita radio stations 
combined. By any standard, KFH is TOPS! 



5000 Watts - ALL the time 



Kribs 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY IDWARD PfTRY A CO., INC. 



WICHITA, KANSAS 



12 



SPONSOR 



17 JANUARY 1949 




New and renew 



New On Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



American Tobacco Co 
American Tobacco Co 
Armour & Co 
Doubleday & Co Inc 
Kerry Morse Seed Co 
General Electric Co 
General Poods Corp 
Liggett & Meyers Tobacco Co 
Longines-Wlttnauer Watch 

Co Inc 
Miami Margarine Co 

Mutual Benefit Health & 

Accident Assn of Omaha 
National Biscuit Co 

Pepsi-Cola Co 
Procter & Gamble Co 

Radio Art Club of America 
P. J. Rltter Co 
Seeman Brothers Inc 

William II. Wise & Co Inc 



BBD&O 

BBD&O 

Foote. Cone & Belding 
Huber Hoge 

MacManus. John Si Adams 
Young «.N Kubicam 
Young & Rublcam 

Newell-Emmett 
Victor A. Bennett 

Ralph Jones 
RuthrautT & Ryan 

McCann-Erickson 
Blow 

I I UN |>l i. i i 

Al Kllnger 

Clements 

William II. Weintrauh 

Twing & Altman 



CHS 


151 


CBS 


1(,7 


CHS 


167' 


M BS 


201) 


CBS 


167 


ABC 


261, 


CI!S 


7(, 


CBS 


-'» 


CBS 


167 


MBS 


200 


MBS 


-Mill 


MBS 


inn 


\H( 


259 


CBS 


SI 


MBS 


63 


\BC 


12 


CBS 


167 


(lis 


60 



Your Lucky Strike; MTWTF 3:30-4 pm; Die I,; 52 wks 

.lack Benny; Sun 7-7:311 pm; .Ian -> ; =>.» «ks 

stars Over Hollywood; Sat 1-1:30 pm; 52 wks from Sep I s 

John B. Kennedy; Sun 1:15-1:30 pm; .Ian ->; 13 wks 

Garden Gate; Sat 9:45-10 am; Feb 5; In wks 

(;. E. House Party; .MTWTF 3:30-4 pm; Jan 3; 52 wks 

(.ant Busters; Sat 9-9:30 pm; Jan 8; 25 wks 

Tales of Fatima; Sat 9:30-10 pm; Jan S; 52 wks 

Festival of Song; Sun 5-5:30 pm; Dec ->(>; 52 wks 

Queen for a Day; TuTh 2-2:30 (15 mln alt); Jan I; s.> wks 
Mayor of the Town; Sun 7:30-7:55 pm; Jan 2; 52 wks 

Straight Arrow; Mon 8-8:30. TuTh 5-5:30 pm; Feb 7; 
Counter-Spy; TuTh 7:30-8 pm;Jan Il;52wk8 

52 wks 
What Makes You Tick; MTWTF 2:45-. « pm ; Die 27; 52 wks 
Creat Voices; Sun 1:45-2 pm; Jan 16; 52 wks 
Betty Clark Sings; Sun 3:15-3:30 pm: Jan 16; 52 wks 
Ulan Jackson; Sat 11-11:05 am; Jan 29; 52 wks 
How to (,i-t More Out of Life; Sat 2-2:15 pm; Jan 8; 4 wks 
Handy Man; Sat 2:15-2:30 pm; Jan 8; 4 wks 



'Expanded network 

i Fifty 'mi imks generally means u 13 week contract with options t»r three successive /..' week renewals, lis subject to cancellation ni the end of any 13-uieek period 



Renewals on Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



American Meat Institute 
B. T. Babbit Inc 

Colgate-Palmollve-Peet < !o 



FalstafT Brewing Corp 

General Motors Corp 
Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co Inc 
Gulf OH Corp 
Andrew Jergens Co 
Lever Bros Co 



Mall Pouch Tobacco Co 

Metropolitan Life Insurance Co 
Philip Morris & Co Ltd Inc 

Norwich Pharmacal Co 
Petroleum Advisers Inc 

Procter ..N (.amble < !o 



R. J. Reynolds Tobacco < !o 

Standard Brands Inc 
Sun Oil Co 

Ton! Co 

Whitehall Pharmacal Co 

William Wrigley Jr Co 
'Expanded network 



Leo Burnett 
Duane Jones 

Ted Bates 
William Esty 
Sherman & Marquette 

Dancer- Fitzgerald -Sample 

Foote, Cone & Belding 

Kudner 

Young & Rubicam 

Robert W. Orr 

Foote. Cone & Belding 

Needham. Louis & Brorby 

Young & Rubicam 

Walker & Downing 

Young & Kubicam 
Blow 

Lawrence C. Cumhlnner 
Ellington 

Benton & Bowles 

( lompton 



Dancer- Fitzgerald -Sam pie 
William Esty 

J. Walter Thompson 
Roche. Williams it Cleary 

Foote, Cone & Beldlng 
Dancer- Fitzgerald -Sample 



NBC 


13 


CBS 


55 


NBC 


99 


NBC 


144 


NBC 


155 £ 


Mil 


144 




139 


NBC 


33 


CBS 


164 


ABC 


111 


CBS 


121 


ABC 


266 


CBS 


149 


CBS 


167 


NBC 


153 


MBS 


109 


CBS 


26 


CBS 


149 


NBC 


145 


ABC 


210 


N lit : 


82 


CBS 


6 2 


CBS 


97 




85 




85 


CBS 


81 


NBC 


162 




159 


NBC 


150 


N B< : 


34 


CBS 


161 


ABC 


17 


CBS 


159 



Fred Waring; Th 10-10:30 am; Jan 13; 13 wks 
David Harum; MTWTF 3-3:15 pm; Jan 1; 52 wks 
Lora Lawton; MTWTF 11:45-12 noon; Jan 14; 52 wks 
Dennis Day; Sat 10-10:30 pm; Jan 1; 53 wks 
Blondie; Wed 8-8:30 pm; Jan 5; 52 wks 
Judy Canova; Sat 9:30-10 pm; Jan 1 ; 53 wks 
Sports Newsreel; Frl 10:30-10:45 pm; Jan 7; 52 wks 
Music from the Heart of America; Th 9:30-10 pm; Feb 3; 

52 wks 
Lum 'n' Abner; Sun 10-10:30 pm; Jan -'; 52 wks 
Greatest Story Ever Told; Sun 6:30-7 pm; Jan 2; 52 wks 
We the People; Tu 9-9:30 pm; Feb I ; 52 wks 
Louella Parsons; Sun 9:15-9:30 pm; Die 25; 52 wks 
My Friend Irma; Mon 10-10:30 pm; Jan 3; 52 wks 
Junior Miss; Sat 11:30-12 noon; Jan 1; 52 wks 
Bob Hope; Tu 9-9:30 pm; Jan 4; 52 wks 
Fishing & Hunting Club; Mon 9:30-9:55 pm; Dee 20; 

52 wks 
Eric Sevareid; Mon & Fri 6-6:15 pm; Jan 3; 52 wks 
Philip Morris Playhouse; Fri 10-10:30 pm; Jan 28; r<l wks 
This Is Your Life; Tu 8-8:30 pm ; Jan IS; 52 wks 
Fat Man; Frl 8-8:30 pm; Feb 3; F>1 wks 
Cities Service Band of America; Frl 8-8:30 pm; Jan 21: 

52 wks 
Rosemary; MTWTF 11:45-12 noon; Dee 27; 52 wks 
Big Sister; MTWTF 1-1:15 pm; Dec 27; 52 wks 
Young Dr. Malone; MTWTF 1:30-1:45 pm; Dec 27; 52 wks 
Guiding Light; MTWTF 1 :45-2 pm; Dec 27; 52 wks 
Ma Perkins; MTWTF 1:15-1:30 pm; Dec 27; 52 wks 
Screen Guild; Th 10-10:30 pm; Jan 6; 52 wks 
Grand Ole Opry; Sat 10:30-11 pm; Jan 1; 52 wks 
One Man's Family; Sun 3:30-4 pm; Jan 2; 52 wks 
Sunoco Three Star Extra; MTWTF 6:45-7 pm; Jan 21; 

52 wks 
Give & Take; Sat 1 :30-2 pm; Jan 1 ; 52 wks 
Zeke Manners; MTWTF 10:45-11 am; Jan 3; 52 wks 
Gene Autry; Sat 8-8:30 pm; Dec 25; 52 wks 



National Broadcast Sales Executives Personnel changes 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Bally A\ton 
Merrill Carroll 
Robert W. Ferguson 
Cecil Green 
Maitland Jordan 
Bert Julian 
Jim McCord 
Holly Moyer 
Roy S. Slnor 
Jim Strain 
E. Wilson Wardell 
Paul S. Wilson 



WTRF. Bellaire ().. sta mgr 

Superior Baking Co, Akron ()., sis mgr 

K.JR. Seattle Wash., prom mgr 

WKMO, Rokomo Ind.. sis dir 

Chamber of Commerce. Storm Lake la.. 

John Blair & Co, H'wood. 

K.ROP. Brawley Calif . regional sis mgr 



Adam J. Young Jr, N. \ .. slsman 



exec see 



WREN. Topcka Kan., natl sis mgr 

W BMD. Balto., sis mgr 

Same, sis mgr 

WHK.K, Akron ().. sis mgr 

Same, sis mgr 

WXGI, Richmond \ a., sis dir 

k\^ 1. Storm Lake la., sis mgr 

K.FRE, Fresno Calif., sis mgr 

K.OPP. Ogden Utah, sis mgr 

K.GI J. H'wood., sis mgr 

CKLW . Windsor. Canada, sis mgr 

Same, vp, gen sis mgr 



.\e\v National Selective Ihisim'ss. >e\v and Renewed on Tele 
vision. Ad\ erlising Agency Personnel Changes. Si at ion 

Representative Changes 



Sponsor Personnel Changes 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 







Paul N. Berg 

R, A. Burton 

William P. Craig 
William M. Day 

Margaret Diwer 

Tdvvard II. Fennell 
George J. Friedman 
Robert \\ . Calvin 
KM. Grelner 
Robert T. Hazel! 

John (;. Iloagland 
I red M. Hunt 
\.l Klein 
Edward lane 
Reg Lovvander 
Dwight Mitchell 
Wesbj R. I'arker 
Paul S. Peak 
Glenn Ray 
Gilbert A. Ralston 
Harold 1'. Requa Jr. 
Sumner .1. Robinson 
I.. J. Schlatter 

William R. Setli 
.I.J. Taylor Jr. 
Burton Tscbache 
I rnest I>. Ward 
Leonard Wurzel 



Erwln, Wasey. Mnpls.. acct exec 

sherwln-W illiams Co, Cleve.. institutional prods 

sis mgr 
Procter and Gamble Co, Clncl., radio dept 
American Telephone & Telegraph Co, N. Y.. asst 

vp 

John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance t !o, Boston. 
assoc adv mgr 



Motorola Inc. Chi., asst to vp In chge auto radios 
Packard Motor Car Co. Detroit, gen sis mgr 
Fruehauf Trailer Co of Canada Ltd. Toronto. 

Canadian sis mgr 
Robert W. Orr. V Y.. radio dlr 



Columbia Records Inc. V V., mdsg mgr 
Squirt Co. Beverly Hills Calif., sis prom mgr 
Wlldroot Co Inc. Buffalo V Y. 
Ceneral Poods Corp. N. Y.. gen mgr of sis 
McKlm. Toronto, mgr 
Whistle Co, St. L.. adv mgr 
Procter and Gamble Co. Clncl., TV dir 
\rmstrong-Rcqua 
Goodall Fabrics Inc. N. Y.. sis mgr 
Eagle-Lion Films, X. Y., asst vp in chge distribu- 
tion 
W. B. Doner, N. Y .. media prom dlr 
Jacob Ruppert Brewery. V Y., adv dept 
Wildroot Co Inc. Buffalo N. Y. 
Best Foods Inc. \. Y.. pub rel mgr 



gen sis mgr 



General Mills Inc. Mnpls.. sis prom mgr. home appliance 

dept 
Same, sis prom mgr 

Same. TV mgr 

Michigan Bell Telephone Co, Detroit. \p in chge adv . pub 

rel 
Same, adv mgr 

Standard Laboratories Inc. N. Y.. sis mgr 
Cillette Safety Razor Co (Ton! Inc div). Chi. 
Same, exec vp 
Same, vp 

Same, vp 

Campbell Soup Co. Camden N. J., radio pgm superv 

Packard Motor Car Co, Detroit, sis mgr 

Langendorf United Bakeries Inc. S. F.. adv mgr 

Emerson Radio & Phonograph Corp. N. Y.. adv mgr 

Same. adv. sis prom mgr 

Same, Western sis mgr 

Same, vp In chge sis div 

Imperial Bank of Canada. 'Toronto, adv mgr 

Orange-Crush Co, Chi., sis prom mgr 

Same, exec producer TV pgms 

Sun Harbor Packing Co, San Diego, adv dir 

Blgelow-Sanford Carpet Co. Inc, N. Y.. gen sis mgr 

Same, gen sis mgr 

Muzak Corp, N. Y.. head adv. prom div 

Same, adv mgr 

Same, Eastern sis mgr 

Same, adv. pub rel mgr 

Loft Candy Corp, N. Y., vp In chge adv 



New Agency Appointments 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT (or service) 



AGENCY 






Admiral Corp. Chi 

Admiral Corp. Chi 

Alloy Tile Corp. Belleville N. .1. 

Uuma-Lock Corp. Portland Ore 

AP Parts Corp. Toledo O 

Bet f America. Hoboken N". J 

Brick ()' Cold Inc, S. F 

British South American Airways, Miami. 

Broadstrcet's Inc. \. Y. 

Browne Vintners Co Inc. \. Y 

J \ < ieazan, S. F. 



Celomat Corp, N. Y. 



Certified Foods Co, L. A 

Chalfonte-Haddon Hall, Atlantic City 

Chicago. Rock Island & Pacific Railroad, Chi. 

Christian Heurlcb Brewing Co, Wash 

Cincinnati Brewing Co. Reading O. 

Clycol Co, V Y. 

Cohen. Goldman & Co, N. Y 

( lolonlal Dames Inc, L. A 

Conklin Pen Co, Chi. 

( lubbison ( iracker Co, L. A 

c\ \ Corp, s. F. 

Doubledav & Co Inc. V Y 

Doyle Packing Co. Long Branch N. J 

E & B Brewing Co. Detroit 

Elm Citv Rubber Co. New Haven Conn 



Esquire Kitchens Inc. L. A 

I W Fitch Co, l>es Moines 

Five Star Manufacturing Co, Grand Forks N. D. 

Fleming-Hall Tobacco Co Inc, N. Y 

I ..st,-. S Kestei Co. Pbila. 

Francus-Albert Products, N. ^ 

Fruehauf Trailer Co, Detroit 

General Appliance Co, Oakland Calif 

Holmes Drug Corp. New Providence N. J 

I l.,r In In r Brewing Co, Allen town Pa. 
Intercontinental Mf g Co, Dallas 
June Dairv Products < " N "> 

Phil Kalech Sales Corp, Chi 

Kerr (.lass Co, I V 
Lam 1 t.l N ^ 



Life A Casualty Insurance Co, Nashville Term. 
I ..,it ( and] < torn, N. Y. 

Maine Canned foods Inc, Portland Me 
I. .III. R, Mai pie St CO, New Rocllelle N. \ 

Merit Pood Products Co, L. A. 

North Eastern Supplj Co, Ipswich Mass 

Pacific citrus Products Co, I ullerton Calif. 

Puritan Sales < ..i p, Boston 

Renuzlt Home Products Co Pbila 

Jacob Ruppert Brewery, n v 
San-Nap-Pak Mfg Co, V \ 

J I Schilling Co.N ^ 

Skvcrulses Int . N \ 

S.,ilak Mfg Co. Sioux I alls S I) 

Stanford Laboratories Inc , Southport Conn. 

Si inlej Di ug I'ti id u< is I'm t land Ore. 

i . I 1 1. Ullani e ( > 



TruVal Manufai turers Inc, N. ^ 
\ an Mum hlng & Co Inc, N. Y. 
Ions, Plalnfield n J 
Walker-Gordon Laboratories Plalnsboro N, J 
M w lie A Co, Buffalo V 1 
u lard- si i.iggs Sloui I ills s i>. 



Radios Kudner. N'. Y.. for radio. TV adv 

Electric ranges, refrigerators Tatham-Lalrd, Chi. 

Mtico ahiminum tile . G. G. Felt. East Orange N. .1. 

Interlocking aluminum shingles. . Schultz & Rltz. Portland Ore. 

Miracle Power. .-..._ Powell-Grant. Detroit 

Bev ( aila Robert Conahay, N. Y. 

Ice cream, dairy prod stores Frank Wright. S, I 

Air travel Hewitt. Ogilvy. Benson & Mather. N. Y. 

Men's clothing Cecil & Presbrey. N. Y. 

B & G French wines Charles Jay. N. Y. 

Capehart. Farnsworth Radios, Dayton 

Tires distributor Russell. Harris & Wood. S. F. 

. Plastics, Vue Scope television enlarging 

lenses, Teleroto turn tables Tracy, Kent. N. Y. 

.Food Bodlnc & Melssner, Beverlv Hills Calif. 

Hotel Gray & Rogers. Phlla. 

. Railroad Caples, Chi. 

. Beer Henry J . Kaufman . Wash . 

Beer Leonard M. Slve. Clncl. 

Clycol vaporizer Seymour Kameny. N. Y. 

Men's clothing Cecil & Presbrey. N. Y 

Cosmetics. David S. Hill man. L. A. 

Pens ■ • . H. M. Gross. Chi. 

Crackers Bodine & Melssner. Beverly Hills Calif. 

LaBoheme wines J. J. Welner, S. F. 

Mutual Book Plan Raymond Spector, V V. 

Stxongheart dog food John H. Riordan. L. A. 

Beer W. B. Doner. Detroit 

Angel-lite, Gold Medal baby pants, 

Dawn Day raincoats, scarves, capes. . . Hammer, Hartford Conn. 

Frozen cooked foods Smith, Bull & McCreery. L. A. 

Hair preparations Campbell-Mlthun, Chi. 

I i eeman Head bolt Heater Barney Lavln, Fargo N. D. 

Sheffield Imperial Cigarettes Deutsch & Shea, N. Y. 

Krvl.m A. E. Aldrldge, Phlla 

Corde handbags W. B. Doner, N. Y. 

Trailers Zlmmer-Keller. Detroit 

Appliances Ad Fried, Oakland Calif. 

Comesol Burns, Summit N. .1. 

Perfection, Pilsner beer. Deglln-Wood. N. Y, 

Tractors, combine harvesters Van Diver & Carlyle. V ^ 

Dairv prods Friend. N V 

Korvo David S. Hlllman. L. A. 

(.lass jars Dan B. Miner, L. A. 

Erlngold, Royal Canadian. Ten Twenty 

tobaccos, cigarettes Klesewettcr. Wetterau & Baker. N. v . 

Insurance L. W. Roush. Louisville 

Candy shops Lawrence C. Cumblniier. V Y . 

Foods Harry M. Frost. Boston 

Betty Gaylord Cream Pie Mix Buchanan. N. Y'. 

Big Champ. Cherry O Kay candy bars . F'rank Wright. L. A. 

farm equipment, supplies . . Peck. N. Y. 

Hawaiian punch \therton. L, \. 

Baked beans, pickles Harry M. Frost. Boston 

Renu/lt. Super Renuzlt Home Dry 
Cleaner, Self -Polishing Wax. McCann-Erickson, N V. 

Beer Blow. N. Y. 

Countess Lydla Gray doeskin tissues, 

dinner napkins, tissues Federal, V Y . 

Children's bonk publishers, mfr toys L. II. Hartman, N. Y. 

Air travel agency Bourne. N. Y. 

Weed. Insect spray Erwln. Wasey. Mnpls. 

Slumber Bath. Hero Lindsay. New Haven Conn. 

Crystallne Liniment Helms & Ilolzman, Portland Ore. 
Taylor Junior portable electric washing 

in ii bine Huffman. Canton O. 

rruVal Shirts, pajamas sportswear Mi Cann-I rl< ksoti. N. V, 

Helnekens Holland beer DegUn-Wood, N". \. 

W i, men's slacks (..(. .Felt . last Orange N. .1 . 

u. .veiie natural plant food Clements, Pbila 

Don Richards clothes Fmll Mogul, N. v 

Agricultural feed concentrate . Erwln. Wasey, Mnpls. 




:■ 



I¥ew development Is on SI»Q.\SOH stories 



p.s 



SC6I "How Terrific is Transitradio?" 

ISSue: September 1948, page 44 

Transitradio is growing, aiming for^nationwide coverage 
of major markets. 



Transitradio is steadily growing to the point where national advertisers 
can begin to lay plans for covering specific markets intensively. Transit 
companies in Cincinnati, St. Louis, Houston, and Scranton-Wilkes-Barre, 
have been the first to sign contracts with Transit Radio, Inc. They are 
almost 100% FM-receiver equipped. Additional contracts have been 
signed with transit companies in Huntington, West Virginia, and Worcester, 
Massachusetts, where installations are under way. Negotiations are 
approaching the signing stage in Washington, Baltimore, Cleveland, 
Indianapolis, and Kansas City, while New York, Boston, Philadelphia, 
Seattle, and Portland, Oregon, arc in the talking and /or equipment- 
testing stage. 

The first transitradio success story comes out of Houston where a 
"large downtown department store" spent equal amounts of ad money 
on TR and newspaper space. Store spent $131 for 15 spot announce- 
ments to advertise nylon stockings — no other medium. was used for this 
test. Copy read, "Regular $2.25 stockings, special at $1.12 Monday and 
Tuesday only." Thirteen spots were used on Monday and two on Tuesday. 
Two hundred and fifty people asked for stockings. The following Sunday, 
same copy and same money were used in a newspaper. Only 68 inquiries 
resulted. 



p.s. 



See: "Oil and the Opera" 

ISSlie: January, 1948, page 41 

The opera debuts in TV with Texas sponsoring. 

the future of televised opera? 



What of 



Some of the critics gave it the works. Most of the trade press gave it an 
"A" for effort, and said caustic things about cameras that blew out and 
make-up that varied between sunburn and yellow jaundice. But the Texas 
Co., identified for years with radio sponsorship of the Metropolitan Opera, 
considers the telecast of the opening night of Othello on i29_November an 
interesting and profitable experiment. 

Telecasting the opera was a last-minute event. Texaco had long held 
first refusal rights on any TV versions of the opera, and when ABC presi- 
dent Mark Woods approached Texas' Don Stewart (Mr. Sponsor Asks, 
3 January) with a $20,000 package deal, Texas signed. About a week 
later, and with no run-through for the cameras, the complete (210 minutes) 
Met production of Verdi's Othello took to the visual air. Texas is free in 
admitting that it was a headache. The conciliatory arrangements with 
the Met's many unions was one reason. Then the Met management, feeling 
that the cash customers in the Diamond Horseshoe might object to being 
scanned, wouldn't permit ABC technicians to place their cameras where 
they could get the best results, wouldn't permit the installation of mechan- 
ical camera-cooling devices (three cameras blacked out during Act III), 
and forced ABC to do its entr'acte interviews amidst the clatter of back- 
stage scene-changing. That the opera went on the visual air at all is still 
a miracle to many ABC-TV executives, and to Texas. 

Texas must share some of the blame for the not-quite-successful per- 
formance. Many of the ABC and Texas top-level management crowded 
in front of the cameras during the early interviews to pat each other on the 
back and talk lengthily of "their duty to the music-loving public." The 
televiewer, expecting to get glamour, got brass sweating under hot lights. 

To Texas, however, must go due credit for taking a chance on such 
short notice, not knowing in advance whether or not the opera would 
make good TV fare. To ABC, credit also goes for making the most of a 
tough situation, and coming up with many a startling close-up of Ramon 
Vinay, Licia Albanese, Leonard Warren, etc., as they sang the famous score. 



Remember the 
story about . . . 



Fulton's steamboat 




that grew into 




the big ocean liner ? 

The huge beauties that rush 
across the Atlantic today 
are a far cry from the 
modest little steamboat 
that first churned up the 
Hudson River. So is today's 
W-W-D-C in Washington a 
far cry from the W-W-D-C 
of a few years ago. Today, 
on both AM and FM, 
your sales message over 
W-W-D-C sails out like a 
mighty ocean liner. Get the 
full story from your Forjoe 
man today. 



WWDC 

AM-FM— The D. C. Independent 

Represented Nationally by 

FORJOE & COMPANY 



17 JANUARY 1949 



15 



u 




Leave us now join 




Before we wipe the old slate clean 

Let's sing a song, let's pen a paean 

To everything in '48 

Which we would like to celebrate: 

To Radio, first, a cup of cheer 

For winding up its biggest year, 

Knowing full well, while we're about it, 

That none of us could live without it. 

Hail to a year of glad relations 

Between this network and its stations 

From West Palm Beach to Puget Sound, 

And, boy, bring on another round 

For the nine-and-ninety million folks 

Who listen weekly to our jokes, 

Our songs and stories, news and dramas — 

Here's to them all, their pops and mamas, 

Their sisters, uncles, aunts and others 

Including in the Lever Brothers. 

To Pepsodent's Irma, Palmolive's Brooks 

To Phil and all the other Cooks, 

To Chesterfields and that old peachy 

Godfrey guy, and Don Ameche 

(The "Lucky" boy)— to Vaughn Monroe 

And Hawk from whom all Camels flow, 

To Johnny and to Philip Morris — 

You're all okay in our thesaurus. 



Hasn't it been a dandy year 

For all the theaters on our air! 

The "15th straight" for champion Lux, 

Ford looking like a million bucks, 

Electric's show where Little Helen 

Is standing 'em in the aisles, all yellin', 

While Armstrong, Hallmark and Prudential 

Just keep on being existential. 

Three cheers, we say, and three more cheers 

For all those doughty engineers 

Who worked the nightdong and the dayJong 

To make those records that can play long; 

All of which just goes to prove 

We're always in that micro-groove. 

Remember the day when General "Ike" 

Stood up before Columbia's mike 

To raise a cool three hundred grand 

For Europe's hungry kids? We stand 

Hats off to "Ike" and his Crusade 

And guys like him who make the grade! 

A pair of Sulka's best pajamas 

To grace the gams of Lowell Thomas. 

And now let's pay our proper dues 
To Edward Murrow and his News 





hands 



Than which there is no super-duper, 
And let's salute our Average Hooper, 
And all our shows — and there are plenty - 
That broke into the tough "top twenty." 
Hooray for Sunday's Peerless Tonic 
Which millions call the Philharmonic. 
(In this connection, shout hooray 
For Standard Oil— that is, [N.J.J.) 

We would be derelict in our mission 
Did we not honor Television. 
Man's glassy essence, thee we toast, 
Now on your way from coast to coast 
Toward new horizons. Hail TV! 
There's more in you than we can see. 
Rochester, Jack and Mrs. Benny 
Of happy returns we wish you many, 
And here's a cane all made of candy 
For Lum 'n' Abner 'n' Amos 'n' Andy. 
Shoot Roman candles to the sky 
In praise of dear old NRI, 
And while we're on the alphabet 
A pox on us lest we forget 
IBEW...RDG... 
abracadAFRA and NAB, 
Four fanfares and a furbelow 
For Messrs. BBD&O. 



Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell, Bayles, 

We know that you will never fail us, 

And may the light of yon great Star 

Shine gently on you,Y&R. 

In Thompson's name we shout our skoals 

And we're all yours in Benton & Bowles. 

On, Procter! On, Gamble! On, Gallup and Roper! 

Let bygones be bygones for each horoscoper. 

Let's pin a sprig of holly on 

The famous Crosbys, Bing and John, 

And with another wreath adorn 

The brows of Gould and Miss Van Home. 

For Variety's "mugs" and Radio Daily 

A long locomotive and a willow-waley. 

Well . . . '48 was mighty fine, 

Now looking out toward '49 
We wish from electronic science 

The best to all our friends and clients, 
To everyone in Radio 

A hug beneath the mistletoe, 
We're only sorry we can't list 'em . . . 
This is. . . The Columbia Broadcasting System. 




Jamison feels like a new man . . 




And why not?, • . we just hired him. 



Mr. Jamison could be almost any Weed and Company 
representative. He came into our life well recommended. 
And he looks to us like the sort of alert, hard working 
expert who will fit right into our organization, where 
we're doing more business for all of our clients than 
ever before in our successful radio history. 

Like all the other Jamisons here at Weed and Company, 
he has an instinctive and highly professional grasp of 
any broadcasting problem that comes his way, whether it's 
. . . an advertiser's problem ...a broadcaster's 
problem ...a radio problem or... a television problem. 

Above all— Jamison realizes that the basic commodity 
he has to sell is service in an intricate and highly 
specialized field of advertising. He 
provides it honestly and expertly. . . 
and the results are already beginning 
to show in good black figures. 

Like all successful men, Mr. Jamison 
feels good about his business... and 
Weed and Company feels good about 
Mr. Jamison. For . . .you see . . . 
Mr. Jamison could be any one of us. 




Weed 



radio and television 
s ta tion rep res en tat ires 



a n 



J 



company 



s a n 



y o r k • 

francisco 



o s t o n • chicago 
a t 1 a n t a 



• d e t r o i t 
h o I 1 v w o o d 



18 



SPONSOR 




In this typical "drag-'em-in" clothing shop, Barney, the man whom saturation-announcement radio made famous, started inauspiciously 



Suit and clunkers 



Thev ssiliirat« k I he siir 



willi announcements— ;ui«l the nisionn i> H<m K in 



over-all 



The men's clothing war is on. 

Led by the "Big Five" of the 
manufacturing retailers (Bond, Richman 
Bros., Robert Hall, Howard, and Craw- 
ford, whose net sales volume adds up to 
over $214,000,000 a year), the chains are 
fighting for a bigger share of the con- 
sumer's clothing dollar. Together, these 
low-priced clothing chains spend over 
$8,500,000 a year in selective radio adver- 
tising. Broadcasting is the day-in -and -day- 
out advertising medium of these chains, 
the chief means of keeping their names in 
the minds of consumers. 

The effect of radio on sales is reported 
by a 14-store clothing chain in the book 
Radio Advertising for Retailers by C. H. 
Sandage, a study conducted at Harvard 



Business School under a grant by the 
Columbia Broadcasting System. The 
chain placed 50% of its newspaper budget 
in radio in September 1939. Fifteen- 
minute programs were used, six times a 
week, with no attempt at uniformity of 
program type— best program in each 
locality available for the job was used. 
Sales increased 34% during the first four 
months of radio advertising. Two years 
later, in 1941, in a corresponding four 
months' period, sales were 80% higher 
than the industry average. Clothing 
chains know that radio is cumulative in 
effect, that it takes at least six months in 
radio to get results— and they use the air 
steadily, almost without exception, year 
after year — 52 weeks a year. They are 



generally skillful buyers of time. In 
radio, as in newspaper space buying, they 
operate as local merchants and usually 
obtain the local rate. The large blocks of 
time they purchase enable them to get 
discounts above those offered on the 
average rate card. 

Turn on the radio any time of the day 
between 6:30 a.m. and 11:45 p.m., in any 
of the markets where these clothing chains 
operate, and before long you'll hear a 
clothing commercial. The manner of pre- 
sentation will vary with the chain, but the 
basic appeal will always be the same - 
price. To be sure, fashion and /or pa < 
ness of alterations will be mentioned in 
many of the commercials, but the main 
pitch will be centered about reasons why 




Radio helps to bring an opening day mob to Bond's Fifth Avenue store. Police were called 



ItariH'vVi iv|»i<*2il radio ilav 


6 Stations — 39 Announcements 


MONDAY. OCT. 25TH 


1 : 59 WHOM 


7:34 WMCA 


2:00 WINS 


app. 7:45-8 WOV 


2:37 WLIB 


8:30 WOV 


3:15 WMCA 


8:35-45 WNEW 


3:30-45 WLIB 


9:05-15 WMCA 


3:30-45 WINS 


app. 5:15-30 WOV 


3:30 WOV 


9:25-30 WLIB 


3:45-4 WMCA 


app. 10:00-15 WINS 


4:30 WINS 


10:14 WLIB 


5:00-15 WINS 


10:34 WMCA 


6 : 04 WHOM 


11:05-15 WMCA 


6:15 WINS 


11:15-30 WINS 


6:45 WMCA 


11:20-30 WLIB 


6:59 WHOM 


11:30 WOV 


7:15 WOV 


11:44 WHOM 


7:34 WMCA 


12:30 WINS 


app. 9:00-15 WOV 


1:14 WHOM 


9:34 WMCA 


app. 1:15-30 WINS 


app. 10:00-30 WOV 


1 : 37 WLIB 


11:03 WMCA 



Howard promoted its use of television by asking viewers to identify Howard Clothes Man 




the chain's price is low: factory -direct -to- 
you, low overhead, out-of-the-way low 
rental area, no costly fixtures or show 
windows, etc., etc. In a general sense, 
any one of the chain names could be 
substituted for another, and the average 
listener would not feel the commercial was 
out of character. Only the specialist, the 
careful listener to men's clothing commer- 
cials, would recognize the specific copy per- 
sonality of each chain. 

The clothing war as it now rages didn't 
just happen. It is a result of economic 
circumstances. Retailers had known for 
months that unit sales were declining and 
inventories mounting — even though sales 
volume was teetering on the peak. They 




Crowd at one of eight stores that Robert Hall opened 

knew that the consumer had replenished 
his post-war wardrobe, and that his real 
purchasing power had declined as the 
prices oi food and hard goods had risen. 
Yet no one was ready to face the issue 
with a quick downward price adjustment. 
On 14 October 1948, Crawford Clothes 
announced a 20' , cut in retail clothing 
prices until further notice. It wasn't 
the first cut that Crawford had made. It 
had cut prices 1^', last Spring, and the 
slash had caused little or no anxiety. But 
in the fall of 1 C )4S it was different. The 
clothiers took it hard, because it por- 

SPONSOR 



tended the price break they feared. They 
too, had been looking at sales and inven- 
tory figures. The independents cried to 
their sources of supply, "What can you do 
to help us meet Crawford and Robert 
Hall competition?" The sources asked 
the clothiers to make up their minds 
whether they wanted lower prices or 
better values at prevailing prices. Price 
cuts up to 40 r f ' appeared spotlily around 
the country. 

Crawford is taking it all in its stride. 
This year, it is spending $250,000 on five 
New York City stations half of what it 
spent from August 1947- August 1948. 
On WJZ it sponsors a 15-minute ajn. and 
p.m. newscast, with Martin Agronsky and 



City with seven 60-minute programs 
(WHN, now WMGM, radio newsreel), 
136 fifteen-minute programs, 12 ten- 
minute, 12 five-minute programs and 36 
one-minute announcements. 

Crawford netted $883,679 in 1945 on 
net sales of $17,939,017. In 1946 net 
sales rose to $26,113,385 (year's end 
January 31) for a net income of $1,724,- 
450. Early in September 1948, Crawford 
announced that its clothing would also be 
sold through leased departments in select 
department stores from coast-to-coast. 
Mandel Brothers in Chicago is the first 
store to lease its men's clothing depart- 
ment to Crawford. This is part of a move- 
ment among the clothing chains to seek 



fixing in the mind oi the listener of the 
Hall method of operating. The listen* i 
must not divide his loyalty between a 
program personality and Robert Hall it 
must be all Hall. 

The growth of Robert Hall by the use 
of radio has been phenomenal in the true 
meaning of the word. In nine years the 
chain has grown from one in Waterbury, 
Conn., to 68 stores, located in the leading 
markets from Massachusetts to Texas. It 
had 28 stores at the end of the war. 
Fifty per cent of its growth has come dur- 
ing the last 2 1 <j years — 25% of the growth 
in 1948. Hall plans to add 100 new units 
in the next few years. 

Robert Hall doesn't open a store cold. 




.Chicago on 1 1 March 1948. Radio is major medium used by Hall to pre-sell a town on its "factory showroom and bare pipe rack" merchandising 



Taylor Grant respectively. It splits 
WMGM's Radio News Reel with another 
sponsor, alternating 3-2 every other week, 
and it sponsors three daily 15-minute 
record shows on WQXR. The other 
$250,000 is used for newspaper advertising 
— to pick up daily business, a direct result 
of the necessity to push the 20% slash. 
Forty-nine of Crawford's 70-odd stores 
are located in New York City's metro- 
politan area. The remaining 22 are 
located in cities in Connecticut, Michigan, 
and Pennsylvania. In 1947-48 Crawford 
blanketed all stations weekly in New York 



more outlets for their manufacturing 
capacity. 

Robert Hall is the one clothing chain, 
among all others, that owes its success to 
radio. It is the biggest user of selective 
radio in the clothing industry. Hall's 
theory is saturate markets. It blankets 
one area, with 15-minute musicals, news 
programs, 10-minute and 5-minute news- 
casts, and one-minute e.t.'s. The em- 
phasis, in most of its programs, is the 
content, rather than personalities. No 
personality must come between the adver- 
tising message and the impression it is 



It blankets each area with programs and 
announcements for 10 days before the 
opening date. When a Robert Hall store 
opens, it is part of the community. 

On 11 March 1948, eight stores were 
opened in Chicago. It was a sub-zero 
day, but broadcast advertising had so sold 
Chicagoans that long queues waited to 
get into the store, from 9 in the morning 
until 9 at night. Indicative of the rapid- 
ity of Robert Hall's expansion are these 
opening dates of stores. On 30 August, a 
store was opened in Louisville and Nash- 
ase turn to page 56) 



17 JANUARY 1949 



21 



TELEVISION 
STATION 




v . 


WAVE-TV 




^a|Hg|^^ 



WILL BE 

ON THE AIR 

THIS FALL 



Ccener at Outdoor Adv c c> 



i3| un iFATigN 




v> 



WAVE-TV 

WILL COVER THIS AREA 



• 



' 




Many sponsors, like RCA-Victor, realizing the attention value of television, tie into pre-opening displays like this of WHAS, Louisville 



Boosting the sponsor 



TV Nl.ilioiiN rapilalizo 



on natural promotion arivaiilajgOK of I ho moiliimi 



^ftfk More TV commercial pro- 
^ff gram promotion is being 

done today by TV adver- 
tisers, but the bulk of it is still very much 
the pioblem of the individual network or 
station. There's hardly a TV station on 
the air in 1949 that doesn't have at least 
some sort of a program promotion budget 
to hypo ratings and mail pull (for TV ad' 
vertisers still the most tangible evidence 
m| TV viewing of sponsored programs). 

These budgets are King spread thinly 
over .in ever-increasing list of program 
sponsors. The average TV station man- 
ager and his promotion man are well 
awan ol th< fad that TV program pro- 
motion is needed. It builds audiences, 
lulps sell sets, encourages further adver 
tising in TV, and above all sells the sta 
tion. However, due to the present-day 



22 



cost of TV station operation, program 
promotion comes in spurts, more often 
than it does in a continuous flow. 

When a new sponsored show comes to 
any one of the four major operating TV 
networks— NBC, CBS, ABC or DuMont 
— there is usually a send-off campaign 
with ads on the radio pages of newspapers 
in cities where the telecast will be seen. 
Promotional plugs are arranged via sta- 
tion breaks (slides, or occasionally film) 
and the event is sometimes announced in 
tiade ads to the industry. From that 
point on, it is largely up to the stations to 
promote individual programs. The think- 
in- ol most network TV promotion men is 
thai the) have tune and monej onlj to 
s< II tin I V facilities of their network, and 
that continuous promotion of sponsored 
TV programs is eithei a function of their 







16 MAN STAFF FOR COIF PICKUP 



diagram 



of KDYL-TV's golf coverage was seen 
wherever St. Louis loversof game gather 



SPONSOR 






affiliated TV stations or the advertiser. 
NBC runs a once-a-month series of trade 
ads featuring salutes to the sponsored net- 
work TV shows on NBC-TV, and has paid 
tribute thus to shows like Howdv Doody 
and Philco Television Playhouse. 

Since Howdy Doody is a daily strip, 
NBC has concentrated a good deal of net- 
work promotional effort on it to sell the 
open time segments of the popular kiddie 
show. The show, for promotion pur- 
poses, is a natural. One recent tie-in had 
Howdy Doody riding in the annual Macy's 
Thanksgiving Day Parade, later worked 
out a joint promotion with Macy's when a 
Howdy Doody doll went on sale during 
the Christmas rush at the big New York 
store. The promotion paid off well for 
Howdy 's sponsors (Polaroid TV Lens and 
Unique Art Mfg. Co.), as well as for NBC 
and Macy's. Some 10,000 Howdy Doody 
dolls were sold in three weeks at Macy's 
for $10 apiece, and window displays and 
counter displays featured the TV tie-ins. 
The result was increased viewing for 
Howdy Doody, a sales promotion story for 
NBC, and larger audiences for the com- 
mercial messages on the program. Bob 
Smith, who with NBC controls the Howdy 
Doody program, also has his own promo- 
tion staff working on the vehicle. 

On the station level, TV program pro- 
motion is down-to-earth. Like the parent 
TV networks, a good deal of the program 
promotion done is of an institution? 1 
nature, often featuring unsold sustainers 
rather than sponsored shows. A good 
half of the TV stations on the air today 
are owned by newspapers directly (such as 
the New York News' WPIX, and the 
Baltimore Sun's WMAR-TV) or are TV 
offshoots of newspaper-owned AM sta- 
tions (such as the Atlanta Journal's WSB- 
TV, the Detroit News' WWJ-TV or the 



St. Louis Post Dispatch's KSD). These 
stations receive continuous support, both 
for themselves (in an institutional sense) 
and their advertisers (directly) with free 
(exchange) ads on the radio pages, special 
listings, publicity in the radio and gossip 
columns, tie-in window displays with the 
paper's advertisers, and various direct- 
mail promotion to the paper's subscribers. 
Such promotion is a "plus" for TV spon- 
sors, who frequently reciprocate by shar- 
ing costs on a two-way (sponsor-station) 
promotion. The remainder of the coun- 
try's 40-odd TV stations have, for the 
most part, worked out promotional tie-ins 
with newspapers in their cities (such as 
Paramount's KTLA and the Los Angeles 
Daily News, and WBKB and the Chicago 
Sun-Times, or WDSU-TV and the New 
Orleans Item). These tie-ins make it 
possible for the two mediums to barter 
promotional space, the usual deal being an 
exchange of ads and perhaps local news 
and picture services for TV spots or pro- 
grams.. In such a case, the newspaper- 
backed promotions are virtually the same 
as those of a station owned entirely by a 
newspaper. 

Newspaper-backed promotions can do 
much to build a sponsor's program to a 
high level of viewing. The promotion 
does not have to be elaborate or costly. 
In TV program promotion, ingenuity 
often takes over when the promotion 
budget runs short. 

One example of this is the Daily News* 
WPIX promotion for the Gloria Swartson 
Hour, a 15-minute segment of which is 
sponsored by A. S. Beck Shoe Co. A 
portion of the show (not Beck's) is called 
Chef's Holiday. Each week, the chef of a 
famous restaurant is called upon to give 
some details of a recipe for which he may 
(Please turn to page 40) 





U/inHniA/ displays are Frequent with WPIX promo- 



tion. New Yorkers are stopped by TV 




SEE/THESE IT I.I.-I.KNt, I II 

MOVIES IN "HH H OWN HOME 

ON TELEVISION, TOO 



A> 



M \(>M the 5 - U H-H %M Wl» " 

Hoa t»*«i m Kud»»m kinttm;\ mvfti 
HOXDAT.Od i WIXD M 1 "-> ' 

*»£ P»8l Krlh 



,nriiini^ti iii 






tlPU/CnSnPr advertising is a regular feature of most 
lluWoUdUCl TV station promotion of shows 



of ffip fojr '" typical culinary competition style, WBEN-TV (Buffalo) starts its ctnro 

ul IMC Idll Nu-Way Market commercial. It was typical News (station owner) build-up MulC 




personal appearances by the mystery girl 
helped WABD (N.Y.) promote Whelan's 



17 JANUARY 1949 



23 



PARI FIVE 



O F 



SERIES 



What's ping on in 
farm research 



\ol very iiiim-Ii ... and whnl there 

is of it seldom sees the liirlii of day 



Valid farm audience data — 
the kind that can help a 
national selective advertiser buy the most 
prospects for his money — isn't easy to 
come by. In the majority of cases, in fact, 
it isn't available at all. In the few cases 
where it exists it is kept under lock and 
kej . There are a few important excep- 
tions. These, however, are confined to 
limited regions. 

Who and how many listen, when they 
listen, why they listen these are some of 
the elements of the near-vacuum in which 
selective advertisers are most often forced 
to buy farm listeners. 

More than 500 stations and many more 
than that number of programs claim to 



serve farm families. How well these 
hypothetical families are served, how 
loyal they are to the service, is a question 
that's important to the job a station can 
do for a farm sponsor. 

One agency with years of background in 
buying farm programs for its clients 
claims it knows of only 40 programs, at 
present, on stations throughout the coun- 
try capable of doing a real selling job for 
a national advertiser wanting to reach the 
farmer and his family. 

The number of such programs is nearer 
200, according to another and equally 
competent source in the field. But the 
head of a research organization whose 
work has included extensive studies of 



Three-station daytime study of rural listening 



40 





















WTAD Qu.ncy In' 




^~«J 














f-^*"«*_ - 


.^. — 01 


■"■ - ■■' — *■ — — ■ — mtw mm 








** ^ * 




HOOPER 




















40 



•S 20 



40 











T 










KXOK si 


louii Mo. 


^~^^~- 
















%»* 


HOOPER 






- - v«5<T 

i 


]"" 



70 











.. , , 












KGIO m.. 


on City 1*': 


i— L. 










HOOPER 

i 



8AM 9 



10 



12 PM 



? 



3 



*Comparubn made by Doody Research of St. Loui Wo wilhSSeUy HooperatinQu 



rural and small town audiences insists that 
there's no finite answer, no reasonable 
possibility of putting the finger on all the 
cunent programs with both audience and 
sell-ability worth consideration by a 
national selective advertiser. It is diffi- 
cult to resolve these viewpoints. 

What stations have important farm 
audiences? When do they have them? 
At what periods of the day and night do 
they have them? Answers to these ques- 
tions are important to the farm adver- 
tiser. Important, that is, if he is to know 
whether he's buying air jam-packed with 
just the ears he wants, or just air filled 
with words and music — and few real 
prospects. 

Some reasonable approximation of the 
actual number of farm listeners delivered 
during a given period would be fine— if it 
were available in any form. But even 
that wouldn t be enough. Are they the 
right prospects? That's where the quali- 
tative element enters. It s where audi- 
ence research touches the problem of pro- 
gram preferences that it becomes truly 
vital, because people tune programs and 
stations, not advertisers. And if you know 
what large numbers of people in a certain 
area like to hear it's one good indication 
whether or not a gwen program stands to 
attract or repel prospects for a given 
product. Take the claim that there are 
only 40 local farm programs on which a 
national advertiser can rely to do a job. 
If the agency spokesman who made this 
statement had in mind a program that 
would not only attract and sell the cream 
of his client's prospects in a given area, 
but a program that would also lend high 
institutional prestige to the firm name, he 
was probably too generous in his estimate. 
Twenty such programs might be a more 
accurate number. 

If the clients' objectives are hedged 
about with such specialized requirements 
that only 40 programs actually fit his re' 
quirements, then there can be no quarrel 
with the agency estimate. There are 
many reasons, such as limited distribu- 
tion, demand, etc., that might limit the 
number of programs that could do the 
necessary job. 

Assuming that a product has national 
distribution, 200 may not be a bad "in- 
formed estimate" of the number of pro- 
grams reaching a substantial farm audi- 
ence that can and have done a satis- 
factory selling job for national advertisers. 

lust what is a "satisfactory program"? 

A certain SO, 000 watt station pours its 
signal into a tremendous cattle-raising 
country. It broadcasts an early-morning 
}0-minute program six days a week, 52 
weeks a year, featuring information of 



24 



SPONSOR 



particular interest to cattle-growers. The 
package costs $27,000 for a 52-week con- 
tract. It's reasonable because the show 
costs little "to produce and is usually sold 
only on a 52-week basis, eliminating high 
selling overhead. To a company that 
cares only about reaching cattlemen the 
show is a bargain at $27,000. The par- 
ticular program has never gone unspon- 
sored for long. 

Ultimately, then, the number of shows 
that will do a job for a national sponsor 
depends upon his individual objectives. 
In that sense the researcher who insists 
there's no finite answer to the question is 
nearer the truth. 

We may assume that an advertiser 
planning a national or regional selective 
campaign has clearly defined objectives. 
He then will need his stations' listenership 
figures figures that will enable him to 
arrive at a fairly accurate figure of his cost 
per listener. He'd like also to have 
definite information about the composi- 
tion of the audience he's buying in order 
to estimate the probable percentage of 
logical prospects for his product. He 



won't get the information in most cases. 
II the program already has a commer- 
cial record, that will tell him something. 
No show can sell products without the 
sales activity constituting "research" of a 
kind. 

In the great majority of cases, however, 
sponsors do not release to station sales de- 
partments sales statistics that throw light 
on what a show has accomplished. Their 
reasons are competitive. Nothing can be 
done about it. Still, such facts as are 
available on shows with long commercial 
histories may be valuable guides to their 
potential pulling power for a new sponsor. 

The reasons the advertiser can't get re- 
liable farm audience data from most sta- 
tions that claim substantial rural cover- 
age are, first, the station would have to 
pay a research organization for a special 
study. If the station's rural listeners are 
of secondary importance to the station, it 
won't be too interested in spending that 
money. 

Further, a much higher percentage of 
rural than urban homes is without tele- 
phones. To obtain a complete picture 



\V lull's \\ ron i: 

Willi Kiii-iii ICi'si'iin-li 

Lack of checkable data on which to base 
cost-per-listener estimates. 

■«» Lack of program preference studies. 

• • Frequent concealment of listening data. 

•1 Limited application of most available data. 



would require a relatively expensive diary 
or interview study to supplement a co- 
incidental telephone survey. 

The second reason valid farm listening 
data isn't usually forthcoming is again 
competitive. Stations can't quite see 
producing statistics that apparently put 
them at a disadvantage. 

Some stations have resorted to mail 
surveys. But the returns on rural mail 
surveys are usually so low as to make 
their representativeness extremely doubt- 
ful. Maps developed from direct mail 
(Please turn to page 43) 



ViHscii ICatlio Index - Av<»ra^» AimIm>ii<<> IVp .Minnie 



Program Types 


All 

Homes 


Metropolitan 
Areas 


Medium 
Cities 


Small Town 
Rural Areas 


1 Daytime Serial (1 5 min.) 
1. 5 times a week — early p.m. 


10.0', 


11.6', 


9.0', 


8.4% 


Mystery Show (30 min.) 
L. Once a week (late evening) 


13.9 


15.3 


15.2 


10.3 


Comedy Variety Show (30 min.) 
0. Once a week (late evening) 


23.5 


26.9 


21.4 


20.1 


A Daytime Serial (15 min.) 
". 5 times a week — noon 


8.8 


10.2 


8.4 


6.8 


C Variety Music Show (30 min.) 
J. Once a week (late evening) 


12.9 


17.8 


11.1 


6.7 


D General Drama (30 min.) 

U. Once a week (weekend daytime) 


13.3 


15.1 


13.6 


10.2 


T Comedy Drama (15 min.) 

/ . 5 times a week (early evening) 


9.9 


9.2 


8.2 


12.5 


Q News (15 min.) 

0. 5 times a week (early evening) 


7.7 


6.6 


7.0 


10.1 


Q Daytime Serial (15 min.) 

J. 5 times a week (late afternoon) 


10.7 


8.7 


11.0 


13.5 


in Variety Music (30 min.) 

IU. Once a week (late Saturday'evening) 


13.9 


11.7 


16.5 


14.7 


11 Popular Music (15 min.) 
II. 5 times a week (early evening) 


10.0 


9.8 


10.7 


9.7 


10 General Drama (30 min.) 
\L. Once a week (evening) 


18.9 


17.7 


19.9 


19.5 


*February, 1948. 











17 JANUARY 1949 



25 



s 



B- ' v 




V^^^UK jLfi) 1 


MB/ ^* ^ 






^iit 


wJ 




The Living Room Furniture Manufacturers pinpoint their amateur show, "En Chantant Dans Le Vivoir," to reach French-Canadian home lover 

Selling furniture the Canadian way 

Living' room furniture iiisiiiui'arl urer 
in >lonl real shows I . S. firms how ii*> «lono 



• While retail home furnishing 
stores have been using U. S. 
radio successfully, furniture 
manufacturers in the States haven't dis- 
covered a successful formula to sell home 
furnishings. A few floor covering manu- 
facturers have used broadcast time 
(Bigelow Sanford, Alexander Smith) but 
even their record of success hasn't been 
outstanding. The feeling of these firms 
is that TV may make a great deal of 
difference but even in the visual air 
medium they're making haste slowly. 

It's different in French Canada. There, 
over station CKAC, Montreal, the Living 
Room Manufacturers have been selling 
furniture continuous!) with one program 
or another over 25 years. The furniture 
companj is the oldest regulai advei ti ei 
on tin- station, having made its air debut 



in 1923, one year after the outlet started 
serving French listeners in Montreal and 
much of Quebec. 

The Living Room firm is synonymous 
throughout French-speaking Canada with 
home furnishings. Their current radio 
program has been planned to achieve just 
that. It's a talent opportunity hour 
called Ij> Chantant Dans Le Vivoir (Sing- 
ing in the Living Room). It is in its ninth 

There wete mam other programs used 
by the sponsor before £>i Chantant. Back 
in l ( >2 5 24 they sponsored symphony con- 
certs under the direction of M. Edmond 
Trudel. This was followed in turn by an 
instrumental trio which doubled sing'ng 
songs of Canadian folklore. The instru- 
mental trio was replaced In I -'vaunt's of 
the Good Old Days, which brought to 



CKAC's microphones such well known 
folk singers as Conrad Gauthier and 
Jacqueline Bernard. 

All these programs brought sizable 
audiences to CKAC and increasing busi- 
ness to the Living Room Furniture com- 
pany. They were, however, just good pro- 
grams bringing good music of a popular 
variety to Montreal. 

After a number of years something 
different was required, something to give 
new impetus to both sales appeal and 
listening. A local slant was desired. 
Therefore to good music was added 
salutes to the French parishes (counties). 
During the program (it's only 15 minutes 
m length i there were two musical selec- 
tions. On each program between the 
musical numbers, there was a salute to a 
(Please turn to page 60) 



26 



SPONSOR 



PICTURE STORY OF THE MONTH 




I 


AVORfl E 


RY 




i Hor 






«:il 4* — 




M rsini si ^ft 




1 - 


. 





1 IJQtPnPr nrpfpTPnPP i$ careful| y ehe^edto determine pro- 
I ■ HolUllGI III CICI ulluu gram type for which there is an audience 




2finrlinrr nrnrrrom tofi " a need is problem °'Ziv'sAI linger, 
. llllDlllg |JlUg[dlll Herb Gordon, and John Sinn (left to right) 



transcription 
is made 



Transcriptions just don't happen. Thousands of man 
hours, plus a veritable infinity of toil and sweat, go into 
putting a successful program on wax. This is es- 
pecially true of open-end programs, which are sponsored through- 
out the country by thousands of local and national advertisers on 
a selective basis. Typical of what is done creatively at transcrip- 
tion firms like TSI, Goodman, NBC-Recording, Capitol, Associ- 
ated, Cowan, and Monogram, is this picture-told tale of the 
conception, birth, and life of Frederic Ziv's outstandingly success- 
ful series, Ronald Colman's Favorite Story. From the preprogram 
research, 'til the sponsors' publicity is checked, the Ziv operation 
is thorough, painstaking, and audience building. 




3. star is signed S 



o has listener acceptance whenever possible as soon as a program is decided upon, (below) Ronald 
man, seated right, signs to headline "Favorite Story." | (Manager Wolf and John Sinn also seated) 





4 -promotion planning 



is supervised by Fred Ziv (seated center). Pro- 
gram must be promotable before recorded 



5PQCtin(T ' s v ' ,d '' wr| ere each program presents a different play as in "Favor- 
" Udollllg ite Story." Ziv's Herb Gordon and Jeanne Harrison check talent 




p costs. There's no running short or overtime on a transcription, 
and prepare for a run-through of a play Colman will introduce 



6rDhoOrcin(T Cdn ' De td ' <en casually A missed cue means recutting the program and it runs u 
IuIIuqIoIIIc (above) "Favorite Story" director explains a nuance he wants as cast make notes 

7nOffnrmonPO is always the payoff. Everything leads up to the moment Q pilttinfT rnfliTI determines to a great extent technical quality which 
UGI I U I llldll VV when the program is ready "on mike" and to be recorded " uUlllll& I UUIII listener hears when program is broadcast by stations 





9- 



onilttorinrr is a must ir transcriptions are to be of top quality. Ifj nnnnnr nlstiflfT disl< is fina ' step before transcriptions are pressed 
ojJUllcl lllg Recording is sputtered right after being made IU l«UfJ|Jtl [JldUllg The plated master is used to stamp out record 




nnrOCCinfT Hick C is c ' one under great pressure. Transcriptions must be perfectly centered, made under correct climatic conditions, and are usually made of pla< 
pi OOOlllg UlOnO tic material which resists wear and yet develops no surface noise as needle glides in the groove. High fidelity is possible on transcriptior 

19 ctflPL mnm °' en ormous capacity is essential since transcription 10 nilhllPltl/ cnec ' < ' s necessary as posters and clippings are indicatior 
\L olUUft I U U III firms have thousands of disks ready to be distributed 10 ' JJUUIILIiy of program's effectiveness for its local and national sponsor 




To Nations 



2^L Select freely any number of stations — one or a thousand. 

2TJ> Select freely the markets required — and only those markets. 

^ji Select freely the best station in each market, regardless of size or 
network affiliation. 

2^L Select freely the best time in each market, regardless of time zones. 

yjL Double up in any market where pressure is needed, by using multiple 
stations, as multiple newspapers are now used. 

y\ Hear programs including commercials before they go on the air — 
^" assuring standard excellence. 

"A. Get extremely valuable free local merchandising support offered by 
many stations for national selective program sponsors. 

2T£ Get the powerful advantage of local tie-up or cut-in announcements 
without extra cost. 

£JL Get the freedom of a two weeks' cancellation clause instead of the 
usual thirteen. 

A L, Control advertising for seasonal or climatic changes or for social or 
racial differences, or for any other intelligent sales purpose. 



Paul H. Raymer Company, Inc. 



1 



Advertisers 





See what other national advertisers 




have been doing over the past twelve years: 


• 


RADIO NET TIME SALES 






% INCREASE OVER 




% INCREASE OVER 


YEAR 


NETWORK PREVIOUS YEAR 


NATIONAL SELECTIVE. 


PREVIOUS YEAR 


1937 


56,192,396 


23,117,136 


— 


1938 


56,612,925 0.7 


28,109,185 


21.6 


1939 


62,621,689 10.6 


30,030,563 


6.8 


1940 


71,919,428 13.1 


37,140,444 


23.8 


1941 


79,621,534 10.7 


45,681,959 


23.0 


1942 


84,383,571 6.0 


51,059,159 


11.8 


1943 


100,051,718 19.0 


59,352,170 


16.4 


1944 


124,680,747 24.6 


73,312,899 


23.5 


1945 


125,671,834 0.8 


78,583,644 


7.2 


1946 


126,737,727 0.8 


82,917,505 


5.5 


1947 


125,450,000 (-1.1) 


89,600,000 


8.1 


1948 


133,461,000 (Est.) 6.4 


100,739,000 (Est.) 


12.4 


. 






Broadcasting Yearbook 



Increase 1948 over 1937 



National Network 

137% 



National Selective 

336% 



National Selective Broadcasting has the greatest potential for 
new business development. It is destined to be the largest national adver- 
tising medium this country has ever known. 




Radio and Television Advertising 

New York Boston Detroit Chicago Hollywood San Francisco 



Who uses radio 




Hero is the lineup 



/ : j|^ Local commercial broadcasting 
fn^ L *y ls near b 40' , ol .ill .in adver- 
^8^F tising. Revised estimates foi 
1948 show that while $133,461,000 was 
spent in the past 12 months for network 
time, $156,646,000 was invested in time 
by retailers. This was one'third larger 
than the total spent ($100,739,000) by 
national advertisers on local stations. 

Since 1942 no comprehensive survey 
has been made on who is using the local 
air. At that time C. H. Sandage, Visiting 
Professor of Business Administration at 
the Harvard Graduate School of Business, 
made a study on retail air advertising 
subsequently published under the title of 
Radio Advertising for Retailers. Today it 
is still the only authoritative book on the 
subject. 

Times change. Sandage's ranking of 
retailers using the air is no longer accu- 
rate. The void which Sandage filled when 
his book was published in 1945 (three 
years after the period during which the 
data was compiled) has continued until 
sponsor decided late in 1948 to report to 
national advertisers to what extent their 



retail outlets are using the air. 

It's different than 1942's report. 
Whereas furniture and office supply re- 
tailers headed Sandage's list, automotive 
dealers (including gasoline station and 
automotive supplies) lead all retailers on 
the air today. Whereas 13.2% of the re- 
tailers in the Sandage sample were furni- 
ture and /or office supply retailers, 14.4% 
of sponsor's sample, which is relatively of 
the same size as Sandage's, were auto or 
auto supply dealers. There's a reason 
for this. 

Home furnishings still are in limited 
production due to lack of properly aged 
woods, etc. ; gasoline and oil are available to 
meet all demand, and competition for the 
auto-supply dollar is very hot. The de- 
mand for automobiles is still way ahead of 
production, but whereas home furnishings 
have no resale value (or a very limited 
one), used cars have been a very lush 
profit item. The public, which has not 
been trained to restyle its home, has been 
trained to buy new cars regularly. 

The result has been plenty of money for 
cars and plenty of profit for automotive 



dealers. There has also been an un- 
pleasant odor surrounding recent auto- 
motive retailer operations which has 
forced them to keep advertising. The non- 
availability of new cars began to ease 
toward the end of 1948, Kaiser-Frazer 
dealers began a more aggressive sales cam- 
paign. AH this has resulted in automotive 
dealers leading all retailing on the air as 
the year came to a close. It's no accident, 
either, that 13% of all the firms listed by 
the National Association of Broadcasters 
as sharing the costs of retail advertising 
were automotive firms. Only home fur- 
nishings with 17% and household appli- 
ances with 14% were represented in the 
NAB retail-cooperative advertising report 
as being ahead of the automotive field. 

Despite a large number of firms which 
indicate a willingness to share in the retail 
radio advertising costs, only a few home 
furnishing retailers are currently on the 
air. As indicated previously, Sandage's 
report, based on 1942 data, listed them as 
number one among retail advertisers. 

A number of home furnishing dealers 
explain their current relatively limited use 



How IK«»i;iil«»rs I s<'«l Air in IJM2 

according to C. H. Sandage 



Type % 

Furniture & office supplies 13.2 

Department stores 11.3 

Men's wear 9.5 

Jewelry 9.1 

General mdse 6.2 

Hardware, appliances, lumber 5.3 

Shoes 4.8 

Automotive 4.6 

Drugs 4.6 

Women's wear 4.3 

Family clothing 4.1 

Food and eating and drinking places 4.1 

Furriers 3.3 
Survey made by Sandage as Visiting Professor at Harvard Graduate School of Business. 

32 



How Retailers Used Air in 1948 

according to SPONSOR survey 



Type 

Automotive 

Department stores 

Grocers 

Personal services 

Men's wear 

Financial 

Appliances 

Hotels and restaurants 

Jewelry 

Women's wear 



/o 


Type 










14.4 


Bakeries 








3.4 


8.9 


Builders and bt 


ildin 


3 supp 


ies 


3.4 


8.5 


Entertainment 








3.1 


8 4 


Feed and grain 








2.0 


7.3 


Radio and TV 
Drugs 








2.0 
1.5 


7.0 


Drug stores 








1.5 


6.7 


Flowers, etc. 








1.5 


4.6 


Soft drinks 








1.03 


4.2 


Home furnishin 


9S 






1.03 


3.7 


Paints and varnishes 






.9 








SPONSOR 





•|iorl«»«l lor l Im» first I iinc 

of the medium by pointing out that while 
their sources of supply indicate a willing- 
ness to share in the costs of advertising, 
the retailer isn't obtaining enough of any 
one manufacturer's product to justify 
advertising it. 

"We'll begin to spend money for radio 
and more for advertising on television," 
explained one midwest home furnishing 
store, "when we have the product to sell 
and the public stops being car crazy. 
We're spending a good deal of money now 
but it's for household appliances (refriger- 
ators, radios, television receivers, and elec- 
trical equipment). Household appliance 
retailers are seventh in rank order among 
the dealers using broadcast advertising 
and many home furnishing stores are in- 
cluded among appliance dealers. 

Sandage combined hardware, household 
appliances, and lumber in his index and 
still reported the combination only 5.3% 
of all retail users of the medium. Spon- 
sor's index gives appliances 6.7% of all 
retail broadcast advertising users. As 
indicated previously 14% of all manufac- 
turers, who are willing to contribute 
(based on NAB's sample) to their dealers' 
broadcast advertising, are currently house- 
hold appliance manufacturers. 

If radio (2% of retail advertisers) were 
added to the household appliance group 
(6.7%) it would make the combination 
third among retailers using the air. 
NAB's report shows 8.7% of manufac- 
turers' sharing costs of air time are radio 
companies. If radio were combined with 
household appliances in the NAB list it 
would place the radio-appliance group 
first with 22.7% among firms permitting 
dealer-cooperative advertising. 

Retail advertising and selling of drugs 
have declined to a new low. More and 
more the manufacturer is required to pre- 
sell his product. While in 1942, 4.6' , ol 
the retailers on the air were drug stores, in 
sponsor's current sample only 1.5% are. 
For the most part it is only the big chain 
operations such as Rexall, Owl, and Sun 
(Please turn to page 60) 

17 JANUARY 1949 




ting IWtoTot Icnqlh 

.» Cneckirxj ^ ,r '' 

S- Checking Heel 10 Rill Length 

6-Chr- 

,1, modern X Ray 
equipment. 



department stores second \ 

' WW* i 




•/IJTA 

. -SELLS 
SERVES 
.' ; .SATISFIES 

5J0 ON YOUR DIAL 



groceries third 







fgg$£M*£$S3ri 



»\ iii **■ m 9.- "K. 




Based upon the number of programs and an- 
nouncements placed by sponsors on TV sta- 
tions and indexed by Rorabaugh Report on 
Television Advertising. Business placed for 
month of July 1948 is used for each base 

BREAKDOWN OF TV BUSINESS BY 




Because of a change in publication date of TV Trends, two months' figures 
are included in this report (November and December). In sponsor's constant 
sample of 10 cities, 15 stations, Network business was up in November and 
slightly off in December. In the constant base"National & Regional Selective" 
category and the complete Selective Index, advertising placement increased 
both months. Greatest increases are still being registered in local-retail category 
with business jumps continuing to be amazing both in the total and constant 
base placement. In local-retail the retailers placing the most business are still 
Radio, TV, and Appliance dealers. On the networks, Soaps & Toiletries which 
have lagged behind, except during October, have dropped again. Tobacco 
dominated the TV network field in December. In National and Regional 
Selective placement, Jewelry led the parade in December as might be expected. 
With 35% of the total TV advertising in this category, it placed a bigger share 
of business than any one industry in either Network, Local-retail or Selective. 

CATEGORIES "TOTAL'' AND TEN-CITY TRENDS 



JUNE JULY 1UG SEP! OCT NOV DEC MN FEI MM »fl Mir 




BIG THINGS 

are NOW in WORK 

for CKLW 






ut 



u* DETROIT a^ 




We'te QoiMXj, SQ |<W °* S0 ° &>- 



-IN *49- 

Watch for announcement! This Greater Voice, fostering Good 
Will on both sides of the border, will give the Detroit Area's 
best radio buy a selling wallop beyond duplication in this market! 

CKLW 



Guardian Bldg., Detroit 26 Adam J. Young, Jr., Inc., Nafl Rep. 

J. E. Campeau, President H. N. Stovin & Co., Canadian Rep. 



17 JANUARY 1949 35 



PART EIGHT 



OF 



SERIES 



I! WW 




j 




Agem«v l»n»,i(!( ;isi <hiol In frequent Iv wiihoiii 
honor in his own or^anizsition 



Radio directors arc strictly 
an anomaly in the agency 
field. No other form of advertising has a 
department head in agencies. There's 
usually a creative head, an art director, a 
media director, etc., but there's no such 
animal as a magazine director, a billboard 
director, a newspaper director, or a point- 
of-sale director. 

As a result, a radio director's responsi- 
bilities range from purely administrative 
and policy making to actually producing 
programs that go on the air for agency 
clients. Their beefs are as varied as their 
functions. They range from the laments 
that they are not permitted to sell radio 
to clients, to hair tearing when client 
changes in scripts arc discussed. 

The radio director, who is first and 
loremost an executive, lias as his greatest 
intra-agency problem the fact that he is 
seldom permitted to suggest radio adver' 
rising to every client of his agency. In a 
pi. ms hoard meeting, he is usually the 
only voice in eight, pro-broadcast adver- 
tising. Final votes frequently are seven 
to one against including radio in a recom 
mendation to an advertiser. This is ex- 
plained by the fad thai radio is hazard- 
ous, it's less profitable to an agen< j . and 



most plans boards personnel came up to 
v.p. stature through the black-and-white 
rather than the radio field. 

With comparatively few exceptions, 
heads of agencies are not radio men. 
There are exceptions such as Roy Dur- 



stine, Ray Morgan, and the heads of 
smaller agencies like Bill Rogow (Neff- 
Rogow) and Ad Fried. If a smaller 
agency is involved and the head is a 
radio-minded man, he is usually the radio 
director as well as head of the agency. 
This is even true in some larger agencies, 
with Ray Morgan being a typical ex- 
ample. 

Since most agency presidents and plans 
board members have come up to then 
eminence through having been account 
executives, and previous to their a.e. 
status having been copy men, they just 
tolerate broadcast advertising. Inwardly 
it is a constant irritant since they are 
forced to make decisions in a field in 
which they have very little background. 

It has become almost a lule for radio 
directors not to "sell" broadcast adver- 
tising too hard at plans board meetings. 

Says one Madison Avenue agency radio 
director, "When I submit a new use of 
radio to our plans board, I use the be- 
littling approach. I never come out 100% 
for a client's use of the air, for I've learned 
that when I do so, I am usually voted 
down in meeting. And I know that I'm 
not alone in this. Other agency radio 
v.p.'s have told me that they have had to 
adopt a similar approach. 

"I don't mean to infer that my agency 
is anti-radio. We can't be. We have 
over $8,000,000 in radio billing and it has 
been constantly increasing. 

"If I've heard once that one picture is 
worth a thousand words, I've heard it 
hundreds of times. I wonder what excuse 
they'll have for dodging broadcast adver- 
tising when television becomes nation- 
wide. In the few meetings we've had on 



l*robl«-iii> williin own a»«'iu-> 



\ radio din-dor is without honor in his own organization 



There is no section within an a; 
radio deparl ment 



thai works like the 



The radio director is the onlj executive in an agencj 
who lias lo f ■ <r 1 1 1 lor his medium 



I. He's usuall) outvoted in plans hoard meetings 

seldom compare with profit! 



Radio department profit 
of other parts of I Ik 



jene\ 



O. 



,verj progra 
[ooper spot 



m produced on 
in i ih ever\ broadca 



the networks i-. on the 



When a radio department assistant i 

out of the department to become 
execu t m«' 



rood he's moved 
junior accounl 



36 



SPONSOR 



using the visual aii medium, the show-me 
boys have concentrated their fire on the 
lack of permanence of the televsion 
picture. 

"Most radio directors are like myself," 
this v.p. concluded, "we know that our 
clients want broadcast advertising, even 
if their advertising managers aie just as 
scared of it as are our plans board men. 
The result is that our broadcast advertis- 
ing billing continues up and we don't have 
to carry the torch for the medium." 

In spite of this radio director's sanguine 
feeling about his lone-wolf job at the 
agency, he admitted that a number of 
campaigns had been cancelled from time 
to time due to his plans board not know- 
ing what radio was all about. 

This lack of agency understanding of 
radio advertising despite the fact that the 
medium has been producing for over 20 
years is another of the radio directors' 
laments. 

"Radio's 'no rules' operation is one 
thing that floors our top executives," ex- 
plains a Michigan Avenue agency radio 
director. "In most other media there are 
some rules that seem to work. Broad- 
casting, being an entertainment medium, 
has few rules and frequently even these 
won't work. Radio's rules are general and 
many members of our plans board want 
specific yardsticks by which to measure 
advertising campaigns — in advance of 
their being put into operation. I frankly 
refuse to assure them of any broadcast 
advertising success before we go on the 
air. Imitations (and we could of course 
copy any successful show on the air) 
seldom hit the heights of the program 
they carbon. A high Hooper show very 



seldom resembles another program in the 
'First Fifteen.' The facsimiles frequently 
reach sizable audiences and sell a great 
deal of merchandise but are not glorious 
successes. 

"All advertising is a gamble, my plans 
board admits, but broadcast advertising to 
them is the greatest gamble of all. They 
refuse to admit that millions may buy the 
Saturday Evening Post and never see a 
client's ad that is in the issue. Hooper 
and Nielsen force them to accept the fact 
that millions may have their radio re- 
ceivers turned on and not listen to one of 
our programs. We can't kid ourselves 
about broadcast advertising and we can 
about our advertising in printed media. 

"It isn't the gamble that really worries 
our plans board," this Chicago advertising 
executive contends, "it's the fact that 
when we make a mistake in radio it takes 
place on a stage that's floodlighted for 
everyone in our client's organization and 
all advertising to see. 

"Mistakes in broadcast advertising fre- 
quently lose us our accounts. We can 
hide them in other media." 

The fact that very little has been 
worked out of a pre-testing nature dis- 
turbs most radio directors. Also the fact 
that it costs huge sums to test a program 
that is nationwide in appeal. 

"None of the unions has established 
scale for test runs of programs and com- 
mercials," points out the radio director of 
a West Coast agency. "It makes no sense 
to test an idea for a program unless we 
have a top flight cast. To contract that 
cast for a 13-week run would cost us as 
much for a tryout as it would for the net- 
work or national-selective run of show. 



That's of course as far as program costs. 
It would naturally not cost us as much for 
time but top talent is more costly than 
time. The result is that very few of our 
mistakes are made quietly. We make 
most of them coast-to-coast. Brother, 
when we miss, we miss for all to hear. 
That isn't good. It doesn't make my job 
of keeping the agency sold on broadcast 
advertising any easier. Our agency has a 
small number of big clients. When we 
lose one, a number of our staff lose their 
jobs, and our radio directors (my prede- 
cessors) have been known to lose theirs. 

"I believe it's time for broadcast adver- 
tising to think about the problem of estab- 
lishing a controlled test area, where we 
can make mistakes without shooting the 
bankroll." 

A related lament is the lack of radio 
showcases. CBS has showcased a number 
of programs, Talent Scouts, My Friend 
Irma, My Favorite Husband, with great 
success. ABC has also shown a few pro- 
grams that have proved commercially 
successful; The Fat Man, Stop the Music, 
Breakfast Club are three of these. MBS 
also has presented a few, but agency men 
feel that, by and large, showcasing is the 
exception not the rule. The radio director 
of a Midwest agency with offices in New 
York and Hollywood expressed himself on 
the showcasing problem in the following 
manner: "You can always point to a 
number of examples of network-show- 
cased successes. Even the program- 
sterile NBC successfully showcased the 
daytime Fred Waring program. But the 
number of programs showcased repre- 
sents less than 3% of all the commercial 

(Please turn to page 44) 



Problems with clients 

1. You see too much of clients when things 
aren't going good and too little when things 
are fine 

2. It takes one type of program to satisfy the 
hig exeeu lives and another to produce sales 
results 

3. Clients seldom accept the fact that radio is 
a habit-forming advertising medium — sel- 
dom goofl unless used continuously 

I. Radio is one medium advertisers refuse to 
accept on faith 

5. Clients always happen to listen to a program 
on the night that everything goes wrong 

6. Clients seldom pretend to know how to 
handle any other advertising medium hut 
radio tlicv all have ideas about it 



Problems with the medium 



1. Where are those sales facts? 

2. Facilities for real pre-testing of programs 
are missing almost 100% 



'loose selling" 



bv 



3. There's still too much 
stations and networks 

4. Radio seldom backs up its own men when 
they make errors 

5. Radio's old timers are not in broadcasting 
now. A grey hair in a broadcasting network 
executive conference is something to shud- 
der at 

6. Most stations and networks talk a good 
brand of promotion but their efforts arc 
seldom consistent 

7. Commercials are still a laughing matter 

i\. Ilardh anyone keeps records for longer than 
two years 



17 JANUARY 1949 



37 




ARE YOU MISSING 

THE MARK ON THE 

PACIFIC COAST? 



I. 



f you're aiming to pin clown a sales message on the 
whole big, wealthy Pacific Coast market, buy Don Lee and hit the mark. Only 
the Don Lee network, with 45 stations, can release your message from within 
even' important buying market on the Pacific Coast 

Pacific Coast people listen to their own local network station rather than to 
OUt-of-tOwn or distant stations, because mountains up to 15.000 feet high make 
reliable long-range reception impossible. It takes a lot of local network stations for 
all the people to hear your radio message, and only Don 1 ,ee has enough of them. 

lbwis allen weiss, President willet h. brown, J Pres. • ward v. wgrim, Director o) I 

i :,i -, north mm street, Hollywood ^s,c ,\i ifORNiA- Represented Nationally by john Bi air .s c ompanv 




; --" ^.ty* 



—i 



Of the 45 Major Pacific Coast Cities 



ONLY 10 

have stations 
of all 4 
networks 




3 

have Don Lee 

and 2 other 

network stations 




7 

have Don Lee 

and 1 other 

network station 




25 

have Don Lee 

and NO other 

network station 



&H 



38 



SPONSOR 



■ 






. 




Don Lee has a station in every city where the other three Pacific Coast networks 
have one. To cover the rest of the Pacific Coast ( 115 "outside" market counties), 
Network A has 1 1 stations, Network B has 3 stations, and Network C has 2 stations- 
hut Don Lee has 32 stations, twice as many as the other three networks combined. 

Only Don Lee, with 45 stations, has facilities to cover both "inside" and "outside" 
Pacific Coast markets, where over 13!2 million people enjoy a buying income of 22 
billion dollars a year. Don't buy your Pacific Coast radio blindfolded. Buy Don 
Lee and reach the whole rich Pacific Coast. 



The Nation's Greatest Regional Network 




17 JANUARY 1949 



39 




%$$$&>. 







"Music, "the sage Longfellow remarked, 
"is the universal language of mankind. 
And good music, programmed always 
over WQXR and WQXR-FM, is the 
language that keeps more than half a 
million New York families constantly 
tuned to these stations. So constantly, 
indeed, no other station can reach them 
so effectively. These families love good 
things as they love good music . . . and 
can afford to buy them, too. Advertisers 
regard them as the most inviting seg- 
ment of this biggest and richest of all 
markets. Whatever language you speak 
...may we help you speak it more prof- 
itably through music? 




\ 



\J 



AND WQXR-FM 
RADIO STATIONS OF THE NEW YORK TIMES 



BOOSTING THE SPONSOR 

(Continued from page 23) 

be famous. The promotional tie-in comes 
easily. Every week, table cards are 
placed on the tables of the restaurant 
whose chef has been selected. The cards 
plug the show, and give the time and TV 
channel on which the show can be seen. 
Since the show uses 52 chefs in a year's 
time, there is an ever-growing number of 
better-class diners whose attention is 
directed to the show. A. S. Beck gets a 
viewing boost from this, and from other 
Daily News-WPIX promotions such as 
the tie-in with Stern's department store 
windows featuring Fashions on a Budget 
hats (the Beck portion), Hick's confec- 
tionery stores' window displays, Miss 
Swanson's appearance at fashion shows, a 
TWA flight to Paris for a look-see at new 
fashions, and a continuing series of ap- 
pearances of the show's star at various 
fashion and social functions. In nearly 
every case, the event is plugged well in 
advance in the 2,500,000-circulation 
News. 

Some stations have found that air "bill- 
boarding" of a sponsor's show increases 
the over-all effectiveness of the program, 
while affording the station a convenient 
and low-cost method of promoting spon- 
sored TV programs. "Billboarding" is 
TV's equivalent of courtesy broadcast 
announcements. Virtually every com- 
mercial program that has appeared on 
Cleveland's WEWS has been billboarded. 

The WEWS billboarding formula con- 
sists usually of 2-by-2 slides, sometimes 
with 35 mm film strips. Such billboarding 
is self-explanatory for the most part, and 
a recorded musical backing is enough to 
supply the audio portion. It is probably 
the quickest form of TV program promo- 
tion to get under way. It uses TV to sell 
TV. The WEWS sales department will 
sign an advertiser, and in an hour or two 
the- station's art staff will have the cards 
in the works. The cards are used "live" 
on easels for the first day (usually that 
same evening) and later turned over to the 
station's film lab where slides, or 16 mm 
and 55 mm film strips are made. From 
WEWS' viewpoint, the promotion is 
doubly effective. It gives a quick pro- 
motional push to new sponsored shows, 
and makes advertisers aware (sometimes 
when the advertiser is relaxing at home 
the evening of the day he signed his con- 
tract) of the fact that the station is inter- 
ested in doing more than just selling him 
time or a program. 

Among the commercial shows thus pro- 
moted on WEWS are Philco's Touchdou)] 
series, Standard Oil Co oi Ohio's Tele- 



vision Tryouts, Li/e-NBC convention 
coverage, General Electric's local sponsor- 
ship of baseball events, RCA's Laugh 
With the Ladies, and Kaiser-Frazer's elec- 
tion-night telecasts. For each of these 
sponsors, WEWS' relatively inexpensive 
billboarding, backed by newspaper pro- 
motions in the Scripps-Howard papers 
and local merchandising tie-ins produced 
greater audiences — with no cost to the 
advertiser. 

The tie-in promotions of WPIX and the 
"house ad" promotions of WEWS are not 
unique. They are merely representative 
of the type of continuous promotion done 
by stations like WFIL-TV and WCAU- 
TV in Philadelphia, WBKB and WGN- 
TV in Chicago, KFI-TV and KTLA in 
Hollywood, KDYL-TV in Salt Lake City, 
WBEN-TV in Buffalo, and KSTP-TV in 
Minneapolis. 

Salt Lake City's KDYL-TV recently 
ran a promotion for the Anderson Jewelry 
Company, a local merchant, that is 
typical of top sponsor-station promotional 
tie-ins which produce greater viewing for 
both. KDYL-TV telecast a display of 
$2,500,000 worth of Harry Winston's 
famous diamonds in a two-hour pickup. 
The promotional campaign was a real 
ballyhoo operation, with tie-ins arranged 
with newspapers, the Junior Chamber of 
Commerce Fall fashion show, and with the 
sponsor. Nearly 100,000 people were 
brought downtown in Salt Lake City for 
the event, and some 26,000 passed 
through Anderson's during the two-hour 
show. The sponsor received extra promo- 
tion in the form of a special KDYL-TV 
Man on the Street show outside the store, 
where the extra crowds became part of 
another show, which had the sponsor's 
own store for a backdrop. 

In Buffalo, the Danahy-Faxon Nu-Way 
Markets received a similar promotional 
backing from station WBEN-TV with the 
two-time telecast of the Nu-Way Free 
Cooking School. The Buffalo Evening 
News, which owns the TV station, went 
all-out in its efforts. The event was fea- 
tured in the daily TV column, on the front 
page with special feature stories, plugged 
in truck signs on the paper's delivery 
trucks, and included in the station's con- 
tinuous direct-mail promotions to dealers, 
set-owners, and proprietors of public 
places with sets. 

Danahy-Faxon put up a tent in down- 
town Buffalo to house the event, and 
WBEN-TV program personnel helped to 
create the carnival atmosphere for the 
cooking lessons conducted by Katherine 
Stafford. Sets were installed by WBEN- 
TV in nearby Nu-Way stores, and thous- 
(Please turn to fiage tnh 



40 



SPONSOR 





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FARM RESEARCH 

(Continued from page 25) 

response to a station's programs can give 
a good idea of the coverage of a station 
for particular types of programs. But at 
best this is only stop-gap information. 

An outstanding exception to the general 
dearth of farm audience studies is the 
continuing surveys of Dr. F. L. Whan of 
the University of Wichita, Wichita, Kan. 
Whan's studies cover radio listening in 
Kansas since 1937 and in Iowa since 1938. 
His reports have attained wide prestige 
and acceptance in the industry. 

Analyses of the Whan studies reveal, 
with distinct regional variations, some 
important biases which influence differ- 
ences in rural and urban program prefer- 
ences. It is possible to apply the results 
of such analysis to Iowa and Kansas local 
programing in such a way as to strengthen 
periods devoted to programs of specifi- 
cally rural appeal. So definitely individual 
is the flavor of local rural preferences (as 
emphasized in previous articles in this 
series) that it would be dangerous to try 
to apply to other areas facts that may be 
largely peculiar to Kansas and Iowa. 
They are not representative of all farm 
areas. 

The general lack of farm audience data 
doesn't mean that a number of broad- 
casters haven't spent plenty of money 
digging out usable facts. To cite 
another example, Arthur B. Church, 
owner of the KMBC-KFRM team, re- 
cently followed up the early research 
that resulted originally in setting up the 
KFRM transmitter to radiate its signals 
throughout the heart of Kansas farm- 
lands. KFRM is a 5,000-watter, daytime 
only. 

It has long been his contention that 
technical considerations prevent ade- 
quate reception in many rural areas, and 
that residents of such areas lack a fair 
share of high quality programs. (The 
Federal Communications Commission 
has had under consideration for a con- 
siderable time proposals to authorize 
a group of "superpower" stations which 
would guarantee all rural areas top- 
notch programing and adequate signals.) 
Last September Mr. Church had Robert 
S. Conlan and Associates do a coinci- 
dental study of the KFRM general area 
comprising 82 counties in the heart of 
Kansas. The cities of Hutchinson and 
Wichita, Kansas, were excluded. Five 
neighboring Oklahoma and four Ne- 
braska counties weie included. KFRM's 
only serious rival in the survey area was 
KFBI, Wichita (another 5,000-watter), 
with KFRM consistently having the 



better of it. Mr. Church is known as a 
commercial broadcaster with ideals. But 
he deserves much credit «from adver- 
tisers for spending his coin in research to 
demonstrate how improved programing 
and better signals affect listening. 

Telephone coincidental studies over 
several years in rural areas by the St. 
Louis market, opinion, and radio research 
firm of Edward G. Doody and Company 
reveal an amazingly consistent pattern of 
what might be called "technical consider- 
ations" in the dominance of certain sta- 
tions in both their rural and urban 
coverage. 

The studies have covered areas from the 
northern boundary of Kentucky to the 
southern end of Minnesota. In all cases, 
without regard for program types or net- 
work affiliation, specific stations serving 
rural areas have dominated their terri- 
tories. 

Of a number of variables the most im- 
portant uncovered by Doody 's analysis of 
his data are station power, nearness of a 
receiver to station (closely related to 
power), and effective promotion by the 



station. In each Doody rural study one or 
more of these variables was present for the 
station leading the area. 

Other important variables revealed by 
Doody's analysis are proximity to a net- 
work outlet, and competition of several 
network outlets in the same area. Pro- 
gram appeal does count also but to an 
amazing degree less than technical factors. 

KMOX, St. Louis, is the most powerful 
in the St. Louis market (50,000 watts) and 
also the most well known. In a recent 
study covering a 30-county spread around 
the city and county of St. Louis, KMOX 
led in 32 of the 40 quarter-hour periods. 
KXOK (5,000watts) in the same study had 
seven first and 29 second places. KXOK 
has done a fine job of promotion in the 
last few years. 

A second recent study found WTAD 
(1,000 watts) ranking first in the nine 
counties around Quincy, 111., as well as in 
Quincy proper. It took first in nine out of 
ten hourly-rated periods. This, according 
to the general pattern emerging from 
Doody's studies, would be expected be- 
cause WTAD is the only network outlet 




A 



FIRST IN THE 



/? 



QUAD 



\ZMce4- 



DAVENPORT, ROCK ISLAND, MOLINE, EAST MOLINE 



AM 



5,000 W 
M20 Kc. 



FM 



47 Kw. 

103.7 Mc. 



TV 



C.P. 22.9 Kw. vijuol 
and aural, Channel 5 



Basic Affiliate of NBC, 
the No. 1 Network 

WOC advertisers reach the biggesc 
and richest industrial center between 
Chicago and Omaha, Minneapolis 
and St. Louis get extra coverage 
of the prosperous Iowa-Illinois farm- 
ing area on WOC-FM without addi- 
tional cost With complete duplica- 
tion both stations deliver the entire 
NBC Network schedule and local 
programs to this rich farming area. 

Col. B. i. Palmer, President 
Ernie Sanders, Manager 

DAVENPORT, IOWA 

FREE & PETERS, INC., National Representatives 




17 JANUARY 1949 



43 



in the immediate area, as well as the most 
powerful local outlet. 

WHO, Des Moines (50,000 watts), had 
one first place and eight seconds, in the 
same study. KHMO, Hannibal, Mo. 
(250 watts), dominated its home town and 
county, just below Quincy. 

In the nine-county region adjacent to 
Mason City, Iowa, a third recent study 
showed KGLO (5,000 watts) first in nine 
out of ten hourly ratings. WHO, Des 
Moines, again came in for one first and 
seven second places. KGLO, Mason 
City, was dwarfed here as in the Quincy 
and St. Louis areas. 

These are typical examples of studies 
which show the dominance of one station 
over others in which the previously men- 
tioned technical factors are involved. 

Doody suggests the tentative conclu- 
sion that program appeal accounts for a 
certain degree of individual audience 
preference, but that general station dom- 
inance is the primary audience builder — 
whether through power, promotion, net- 
work affiliation, or the fact it is the only 
station in the area. 

Still, the findings of the A. C. Nielsen 



Company (reproduced in the table ac- 
companying this story), showing strong 
overall variations in program preferences 
between urban and rural listeners, suggest 
that where similar biases are emphasized 
and exploited through promotion, a sta- 
tion may greatly strengthen rural audi- 
ences to certain programs. Just that, as 
a matter of fact, has been accomplished 
by numbers of stations (see sponsor for 
December and 3 January). 

To test the effectiveness of such pro- 
gram development, however, calls for 
qualitative research into program atti- 
tudes and preferences. 

When the International Harvester Co. 
studied the rural appeal of their CBS pro- 
gram Harvest oj Stars, they not only set up 
the study to find how the show was being 
received among their prospects, but how 
by further specialized programing they 
might broaden the show's appeal so as to 
attract more listeners from among their 
prospects. 

These studies, carried out by the radio 
research department of the Harvester 
agency, McCann-Erickson, use the Laz- 
arsfeld-Stanton Program Analyser and its 



associated techniques. Similar mechanical 
devices and psychological methods are 
employed by other agencies, and also by a 
number of independent research organi- 
zations. 

Of course the fact that Harvest of Stars 
is a network program makes a difference. 
Qualitative program analysis is an expen- 
sive type of research; only a few stations 
have ever utilized it. 

It will actually take both quantitative 
and qualitative check-ups to uncover the 
full weaknesses of much that is hopefully 
labeled "farm programing" — and also to 
show just how sound and effective is other 
programing under the same label. There's 
no reason to doubt, however, that ways 
will be found to furnish the necessary 
facts at a reasonable cost — when farm 
advertisers wake up to what they're miss- 
ing without them. The farm market is 
too big today to be given the short shrift 
that research has handed it during the 
past decade. Since it can now be served 
by national advertisers at a profit, re- 
search is bound to be called in to uncover 
how to sell it effectively. * * * 







'Just ask your 
Raymer representative 



DIRECTORS' LAMENT 

(Continued from page 37) 

programs on the air. Most showcased 
programs are the property of the net- 
works. You can count on your fingers the 
showcased programs that are presented 
for agencies, and you won't require more 
than one hand to count them. 

"While it's true," commented this radio 
director, "that radio is a declining adver- 
tising medium and television is going to 
take its place as a major medium, the 
T day is many years away. Since we are 
going to have to split budgets between 
radio and television, we more than ever 
require major showcasing in both forms of 
broadcast advertising. I think that the 
networks and independent stations should 
face the problem now, before clients be- 
come disturbed about gambling in both 
sound and sight on the air." 

"There's too much publicit) about the 
fortunes radio's stars collect," laments one 
radio director of an agency majoring in 
daytime serials. "The result is that our 
, Ik :nts have the idea that we pay everyone 
more than tlu\'iv worth. Most of our 
talent gets less than $500 a week for five 
shows and even our 'stars' seldom exceed 
$750 per program each week. There are 
few programs day or night on the air 
paying stars much more than the) are 
worth, but you'd never believe that it you 
read the dailj press and the trade papers 
i il advei t ising. As long as performers de- 



44 



SPONSOR 




EASTERN Sales Manager 
WESTERN Sales Manager 



Wythe Walker 
Tracy Moore 



551 -5th Avenue, New York City 
6381 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, Calif. 



clearest 



16% Clearer 






It 









5. 




1 / ■ v. r ] \ y // 

/ J K J if '■■> .'' 

$ / • • -i : t *j i j&fi* 



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Hi 






WNBT 



The face on the living-room screen 
is 16% clearer on II VBT 
than on the next besl New York 
station ... and WNBT is 
setting the standard of 
technical reception fur all the 
other stations of the 
NBC Television Network. 



>* 















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rechnica] superiority 

multiplies viewers . . . 

and the audience to NBC. 

For viewers' preference 

see page 51. 

For the margin of 

advertisers' preference 

see NBC in 

( lomparagraph. 





SUNDAY 


MONDAY 


pm 


TUESDAY 


WEDNESDAY 


THURSDAY 


pm 


FRIDAY 




SATURDAY 




RBI CBS m°."„, (1BC 


BBC CBS A nBC '; RBI (BS A (1B( | RBC IBS ,„„"„, nBC | RB( IBS A nB( . 


IL^^HJLU ^Cii^M_LLlJ LlJ.^Lfti^I.E^^HjJ^'fl 


1^» EAST 
February 1949 

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MIDWEST 



February 1949 

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one 



[mages clearer on NBC, programs 
more popular, audiences larger ... in 
fact, in answer to the question "Which 
one television station do you view 
the most?" viewers in the New ^ <>ck 
area state a three to one preference for 
NBC over the second ranking station.* 

With a lead like this, it's no 
wonder that four times as main network 
advertisers are on NBC Television 
as on any other network. 

'•Complete details on request 




THE NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY 

A service of Hrnlio ( .orporafion of America 




Mr. Sponsor asks... 



" ( There is a place in national selective cam- 
paigns for both live and e.t. breaks and an- 
nouncements. What should be the determining 
factors in the use of each?" 



James B. Melick 



Genera/ Sales Manager 

American Maize-Products Company, N. Y. 




The 

I' irked Panel 

answers 

Mr. Meliek 



This question is 
one that leads to 
easy generaliza- 
tions. The answer 
to whether live or 
e.t. campaigns are 
belter for the na- 
tional selective ad- 
vertiser depends 
primarily on the 
type of campaign 
being planned, and what that campaign 
must accomplish. 

Certain basic points should guide al- 
most any advertiser in making a choice 
between live and e.t. 
/. What is the nature of the product? 

Even advertisers who make more than 
one product find that the best way to sell 
one of them may be with live copy, and to 
sell the other e.t.'s are necessary. If the 
copy points to be gotten over to the 
listeners are many, and must be delivered 
ir a consistent manner, e.t.'s are probably 
the answer. If they are few, and depend 
largely on the individual local personality 
(Hi, Jinx!, Mary Margaret McBride, etc.) 
the answer may be live copy. 
2. Is the selling to be done via programs or 
station breaks? 

Live copy harmonizes better, on the 
whole, with live shows, although there are 
exceptions (such as VVNBC's Bob Smith 
Show where e.t.'s are integrated through 
musical introductions). With station 
breaks, it is not always possible to tell in 



advance if the announcer will suit the live 
copy, hence e.t.'s are usually the rule. 
3. Are there any "variables" in the radio 

selling techniques? 

Some advertisers have found that their 
best selective results have been produced 
by service-type announcements (time, 
weather, etc.). Others use holiday, sea- 
sonal, or some form of local tie-ins. 
Bulova Watch has built an extremely suc- 
cessful business around live (for the most 
part) announcements which feature time 
and holiday variables. On the other 
hand, Pepsi-Cola, not concerned with this 
factor, sticks to its famous e.t. jingles. It 
is well to bear in mind that the costs of 
making e.t.'s to meet every possible vari- 
able in service announcements would be 
prohibitive. 

Let me summarize my answer to your 
question this way. The advertiser choos- 
ing between live copy and e.t.'s should 
first review his radio selling approach. 
The answer should then be fairly obvious. 
James M. Gaines 
Director of 0&0 Stations 
NBC, New York 



There is plenty 
of room in broad- 
casting for both 
live and e.t. cam- 
paigns. But the 
answer to your 
question boils 
down to this. 
Straight live copy 
does a straight 
job. E. t . an- 
nouncements can often do much more. 
Some advertisers sell their product on 
the basis of immediate need, as for ex- 
ample cold remedies. Such an advertiser 




may be better off with live copy, although 
e.t.'s can be made in advance to cover 
most of the obvious tie-ins with weather, 
storm, and other conditions. Many ad- 
vertisers use local shows where the voice 
doing the commercials is a local person- 
ality. An advertiser who buys programs 
on the basis of personality can work com- 
mercials into such a show as an integral 
part of the whole. We do that with our 
own show, Start the Day With a Smile, on 
New York's WMGM. 

The great majority of national selective 
advertisers get the greatest results for 
their advertising dollar when they con- 
duct their campaign on an e.t. basis. 
E.t.'s have more polish, and can be done 
with fancier production than the average 
local station can afford. When timebuy- 
ing is done on the basis of the time and not 
the personality, this becomes a matter of 
great importance. The advertiser knows 
that the quality of his announcements 
will be consistent in all markets, and not 
dependent upon the mood, ability, physi- 
cal condition (night announcers get tired, 
you know), and attitude of the local an- 
nouncer. True, it costs more to make a 
good e.t. than to send live copy to a local 
station. The results in most cases will 
more than justify this cost. 

A good jingle, or a good dramatic-type 
spot, can do a real selling job. Some 
jingles get a continuing "free play" when 
kids and housewives go around humming 
them all day. There are lots of instances 
of cases where the jingles have caught on 
so well that the campaign produces more 
results than even the best agency or spon- 
sor estimates. Few listeners mind being 
sold something when they are being enter- 
tained at the same time. 

Lanny and Ginger Grey 
Radio productions and jingles 
New York 



5? 



SPONSOR 



T" 




The main ad- 
vantage of a live 
spot campaign is, 
I believe, econ- 
omy. You get an 
announcer for free 
with your time 
purchases. You 
save the money 
you might have 
put into singers, 

musicians, a sound effects man, actors, 
and so on. In addition, you save the cost 
of studios, masters, pressings, and postage. 
You can also revise your campaign 
quickly — in fact, overnight — as well as 
inexpensively, to accommodate seasonal, 
weather, and price changes. All you have 
to do is mail (or wire) out new copy, 
whereas it takes at least ten days to get 
new pressings made and shipped. 

But of course live copy also has its dis- 
advantages. You never know who's 
going to deliver your copy or how he'll do 
it. He may turn out to be a cousin of 
Mortimer Snerd. You can't make use of 
music or dramatized announcements or 
sound effects. You've got to use straight, 
one-announcer copy — period! You'll also 
find you get fewer words in your live an- 
nouncements because many stations, 
when selling live announcements, put 
word limits on them that are far below 
what you can get in easily if you were to 
record your copy. For example — a live 
chainbreak is often 25 words in length — 
but you'll find it easy to get 35 words into 
a recorded 15-second announcement. 
Those extra 10 words come in mighty 
handy! Remember, too, it requires a re- 
cording session to tum out another 
Chiquita Banana or a Willie the Kool 
Penguin, or a Bromo-Seltzer train. So if 
you do need live copy for quick changes, 
and want to use devices which can only 
be done via transcription, how about using 
recordings and making them openend? 

Bob Foreman 

Radio and Television Commercials 

BBD&O, New York 



A decision could 
be based on one 
simple applica- 
tion. A national 
advertiser either 
needs a local per- 
sonality or he 
doesn't. If he 
A kkr doesn't, 

^ scribed spot that 

can employ sound 
effects, vocal groups, name personalities, 
and dramatics can be more effective. 





"Drop dead/' one of his listeners wired 

Like most election prognosticators, he had a slight touch 
of foot-in-mouth disease about the results. Some of his 
listeners supplied a variety of comments on his com- 
mentaries, the most unflattering of which he quoted on his 
first post-election broadcast. 

It's this combination of good sportsmanship and good 
showmanship that keeps ^he Fulton Lewis, Jr. program 
very much alive. For every listener who recommends his 
early demise, there, are a hundred who register violent 
approval . . . but whether they tell him to crawl back in 
the woodwork or nominate him for president, the) listen 
to his program night after night. 

Currently sponsored on more than 300 stations, the 
Fulton Lewis, Jr.. program commands a vast and loval 
audience. It affords local advertisers network prestige 
at local time cost, with pro-rated talent cost. 

Since there are more than 500 MBS stations, there may 
be an opening in your city. If you want a readv-made 
audience for a client lor yourself), investigate now. 
Check your local Mutual outlet -or the Co-operative 
Program Department. Mutual Broadcasting System, 
1440 Broadway, NYC 18 ( or Tribune Tower, Chicago 11). 



17 JANUARY 1949 



53 



North Carolina's 
Golden Triangle 



WINSTON- 
SALEM 



GREENSBORO 




HIGH POINT 



No. 1 Market 

IN THE 

SOUTH'S No. 1 STATE 



288.700 People 



* 



$271. 683.000. Retail Sales 
$410,987,000. Buying Income 

* Copr. 1948, 
Sales Management Survey of Buying Power; 
further reproduction not licensed. 



Saturated by 

THE STATIONS 

MOST PEOPLE 

LISTEN TO 

MOST! 



(^ WINSTON-SALEM (J) 

THE JOURNAL-SENTINEL STATIONS 



Fatima's Basil Rathbone announcement 
campaign was extremely effective because 
it employed something that could not be 
produced locally — the unusual and atten- ; 
tion-getting voice of Mr. Rathbone. 
Lucky Strike's campaign of constant 
repetition depends on a mechanical repro- 
duct ion of either voice or music that can- \ 
not be produced by every station, used 
with the precise definition the agency 
might require. 

On the other hand, if the advertiser has 
the problem of reaching a specialized 
group and is anxious to have it go out 
and buy the product as quickly as 
possible, there is no more effective method 
than using a local personality who has de- 
veloped in his listeners a feeling of con- 
fidence in every product he, recommends. 
His personal seal of approval is a guaran- 
tee that, because his listeners have found 
satisfaction in their use of his previously 
mentioned products, they will also be 
happy with his latest recommendation. 
This personal relationship that has been 
established between a local personality 
and his audience cannot be improved upon 
with a transcribed announcement — or, at 
least, it hasn't been yet. 

William B. McGrath 
Managing Director 
Station WHDH, Boston 




DIRECTORS' LAMENT 

(Continued from page 44) 

liver listeners to advertising at a reason- 
able cost (and most names do that) ,what 
we pay them is immaterial." 

Few radio directors have printable 
laments about their clients. The tiny 
percentage, who can be persuaded to talk, 
wishes that clients would tell their agencies 
their objectives and then keep their hands 
off programs and commercials. 

"It's bad enough what most clients 
want done with their programs, but what 
they ask us to do with their commercials 
is beyond reporting. For years I have 
had to listen to clients (presidents, general 
managers, sales managers, advertising 
directors) who start off with the dis- 
claimer, 'of course I know absolutel) 
nothing about radio but I'm certain that 
il you changed . . .'. With this prelude 
they remake the commercial and dig a 
In »le six feet deep in which to bury it. The 
great commercials that have been broad- 
cast have been the work of advertising 
agency men who were given a problem 
and solved it. Too many cooks ma) 
make trouble in the kitchen, but when you 
have too man) advertising executives 
t lu % drstioN productive broadcast adver- 
tising. Frankly I don't even believe in 




times a day direct 



from our studio in the City 
Room of The Newark News. 
WNJR is the only New Jersey 
station offering com plete 
national and local news 
coverage. 

Another exclusive availability on . . . 

the radio station of the 
Newark Evening News 

ReproenUd by: A VERY-KNODEL, INC. 



WNJR 

91 Halsey St., Newark 
MArket 3-2700 



BMI 



SIMPLE ARITHMETIC 

IN 

MUSIC LICENSING 

BMI LICENSEES 
Networks 
AM 1 < 896 

TV A0 

Short-Wave 

Canada 

TOTAL BMI — 
LICENSEES^ 2 - 510 

You are'assured of 
complete coverage 
when you program 
BMI-licensed music 

As of January 10, 1949 



BROADCAST MUSIC, INC. 

580 FIFTH AVE., NEW YORK 19 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD 



54 



SPONSOR 



our own 'plans board' routine. I've seen 
too many good advertising campaigns 
loused up in 'plans board' meetings." 

When radio directors put the broadcast 
advertising industr) on the scales they 
find a number of things wanting. They 
would like a central source to which they 
could turn for facts about broadcast ad- 
vertising. They think that BMB i Broad- 
cast Measurement Bureau) is a sizable 
advance over previous methods of ascer- 
taining station coverage and they hope 
that its expanded service will be a further 
help to them. 

"Coverage information isn't enough," 
says the radio director of a Boston adver- 
tising agency. "I would like to be able to 
turn to some bureau and be able to find 
the answer to what type of program the 
South or any part of the U. S. A. listens to 
most. I would like a source for sales 
effectiveness figures for broadcast adver- 
tising. I would like to know what has 
been done and what can be done to stimu- 
late retail and wholesale outlets to get 
behind a national broadcast campaign. 1 
know that you at sponsor are trying to 
report this information for us but when I 
need it I can't go through a number of 
back issues to find what I require. I want 
the information at my telephone tips. 
Besides it's hardly the job of a trade paper 
like yours to serve as an industry infor- 
mation clearing house. (Sponsor hopes 
in years to come to be able to give any advet' 
Using executive the information he requires 
in answer to a simple telephone call. We 
answer hundreds of calls a month now and 
do our best to serve sponsors and their 
agertcies. We admit that we have a long 
way to go before we become an industry 
clearing house but we are trying.) A radio 
director of an agency gets very little 
broadcast industry help in his daily job. 
As a matter of fact he stands very much 
alone both in his agency and in radio. 

"The radio director of a big agency is on 
the hot seat. Every new program his de- 
partment presents may become his exit 
door." 

Which is one reason why so few "new" 
commercial programs are heard. One top 
network man moving to an agency re- 
cently symbolized a great deal of radio 
director thinking. Said the ex-web man, 
"I'm not buying untried programs. I 
like my head out of a sling. Showcase 
them, if you want to do business with 
me." * * * 



The program laments of radio directors and the aches of 
program directors will be the subject of the last of 
SPONSOR'S "Lament" series. It will appear in the 
31 January issue. 



•a 



Advertisers 

"I K <ish to compliment W FBL 
on t he line cooperation which 
i .., ilt.-ir merchandising a> 
V'TlVsurTly hZ \Zulated our sales 
partment. It surety nu* ,,.,,» 

in the Central New York area. 

John Murphy, Div. Sales Mgr. 

J ° c< F> Mueller Macaroni Co. 




ix 



SHARE OF AUDIENCE 



WFBL offers you the biggest ond best share of audience. 
Here's the record — 

C. E. HOOPER— TOP 20 STATIONS IN THE U.S.A. 

May-June June-July July August August-Sept. Sept. -Oct. 

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AND IN SYRACUSE- 

May through October — 1st Mornings and Afternoons 



SUPERIOR PROGRAMMING 



& 



With 26 years of broadcasting experience, we at WFBt (enow 
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design our programs to attract loyal, faithful listeners. A 
full staff orchestra, soloists, veteran newsmen, a Farm Service 
Director and many other WFBL personalities contribute to the 
daily listening pleasure of the WFBL audience. WFBL person- 
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totaling more than 40,000 throughout Central New York 
during the past two years. 



MERCHANDISING AND PROMOTION 



# 



Designed to help you sell your merchandise, WFBL's Promotion 
Department uses every means to promote your program and 
your product. Newspaper ads, car cards, displays, direct 
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used effectively to sell merchandise for WFBL advertisers. 



TOP FACILITIES 



WFBL is proud of its new modern studios, Central New York's 
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Ask FREE & PETERS about Current availabilities on 



WFBL • WFBL-FN 

BASIC CBS 
IN SYRACUSE . . . THE NO. 1 STATION 



17 JANUARY 1949 



55 



SUIT AND CLOAKERS 

(Continued from page 21) 

ville respectively. On 10 September there 
was a Des Moines opening. On 23 Sep- 
tember stores were opened in Minneapolis, 
St. Paul, and Oklahoma City. On 21 
October, when Robert Hall opened a store 
in Wichita, Kansas, a letter came to the 
home office, saying, in part, "I was in your 
store yesterday, and the place was teem- 
ing with people. After two days of busi- 
ness here in Wichita, Robert Hall is an 
old established business." 

Robert Hall has 21 stores in New Eng- 



land (until August, 1948, known as Case 
Clothes), 19 in the New York metropol- 
itan area, ten in Chicago and a store in 
Milwaukee, Detroit, Houston, New Or- 
leans, Atlanta, Dallas, Fort Worth, 
Arkansas, Gary and Hammond, Indiana, 
and Tulsa i 

In Chicago, Robert Hall uses six sta- 
tions and in New York, WMCA and prac- 
tically every station from 930 kc. up. As 
a subsidiary of United Merchants and 
Manufacturers, Inc., with holdings of tex- 
tile mills, and finishing plants (has large 
foreign holdings, too), Robert Hall is 
theoretically in a strong position as the 




MBS • TSN 

KM AC -KISS 

Howard W. Davis, owner 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY 

John E. Pearson Company 



merchandising end of a vertical operation, 
but Robert Hall still buys from 70 to 80% 
of all clothing it sells. It manufactures 
none of its women's clothing. 

Robert Hall's copy is slanted to reach 
the bargain basement consumer. It 
pushes its minimum overhead, the fact 
that its stores are in low rent areas, bare 
pipestem racks, bare walls, cash only, low 
mark-up, yet high quality workmanship 
and latest styles. Each commercial opens 
out of a 30-second jingle: 

When the values go up, up, up 
And the prices go down, down, down 
Robert Hall this season 
Will show you the reason 
Low overhead, low overhead! 

The commercial (changed every two 
months) that follows is in dramatic form, 
usually a conversation between two per- 
sons who manage, in the course of a high- 
lighted situation, to get across the base- 
ment note by telling about Robert Hall's 
low overhead — no elaborate store fronts, 
no show windows, no decorations inside, 
only row on row of pipe racks ^Hall's new 
twist of the tried-and-true "factory-to- 
you" pitch. 

Robert Hall is the supennarket chain of 
the clothing chains. Its stores have no 
show windows (glass brick takes the place 
of show windows) and the stores usually 
have a parking lot attached for the use of 
customers. The chain is estimated to be 
doing business at the rate of nearly 
$35,000,000 annually, and its bill for radio 
is the largest of all the chains — about 
$1,750,000 a year. 

Robert Hall's use of radio is the logical 
extension of Barney's — the independent, 
one store clothier who ran a hole-in-the- 
wall, one of the many small pull-them-in 
clothing stores that lined 7th Avenue, into 
an institution by means of dramatic radio 
copy. Barney's "Calling All Men! Call- 
ing All Men! To 7th Avenue and 17th 
Street!" is perhaps the best known com- 
mercial signature in selective radio. 

It was first used in 1934 during the 
Hauptman trial which WNEW, New 
York independent station, was covering 
intensively. Barney's commercials were 
spotted all through the trial reports, and 
his signature was heard by millions of 
listeners in the metropolitan area during 
the course of the trial— he is still using 
radio in New York City in the saturation. 
morn-'til-night, seven-days-a-week man- 
ner to the tune of $150,000 a year. 
Barney is the originator of the sensa- 
tional-commercial use of radio to saturate 
a market. 

Howard was the first clothing chain to 



56 



SPONSOR 



use co-op and programs, first to stress its 
programs beyond disk jockey and news 
shows. It spent over $300,000 in network 
co-ops on such programs as Howard 
Dandies on CBS from '29 to '31; Beau 
Brummel of Songs for two months in '32; 
Show of the Week from January '40 to 
April '41 and the Adventures of Bulldog 
Drummond for eight months of '41 and 
'42 — all half-hour shows. 

On WOR Soldiers of the Press (re- 
corded) was sponsored from 28 February 
1943 to 17 November 1946. The show 
changed its name in August 1945 to One 
Man's Destiny. From 24 November 1946 
to 12 October 1947 Special Assignment 
took over the same Sunday 12:30-12:45 
p.m. spot. On 12 October 1947 to 15 
February 1948, Melvin Elliot, news com- 
mentator, was sponsored. 

Howard used selective radio at the rate 
of $100,000 annually for 33^ years until 
the war and shortage of merchandise 
forced them to curtail their radio opera- 
tions. In 1947, Howard spent $50,000 on 
VVMCA for programs and announce- 
ments. 

Effective January 3 1 , Howard will spon- 
sor George Bryan s news show on WCBS, 
M-W-F, 11-11:10 p.m. Tab for the pro- 
gram will run to about $45,000 a year. 

Since April 1948 Howard has been 
sponsoring the boxing matches on tele- 
vision over WABD, a program which is 
costing the chain $100,000 a year. All its 
major commercials are on film and one- 
minute in length. 

For a while, Howard featured a 
Howard Clothes Man, a well-groomed 
model who was shown to the audience on 
film. Viewers were told that the model 
would appear at important social or sports 
events, and that the first person to recog- 
nize him would receive a suit of clothes, 
two shirts, three ties and three handker- 
chiefs. The promotion stunt worked all 
right for Howard's, but not so well for the 
model. He was so harassed by prize 
seekers that he threw over the job. 

Howard's advertising is a combination 
of price and fashion. Compared with 
Robert Hall's, it's straight. The 43 
Howard stores are distributed mostly in 
the New York metropolitan aiea, as are 
Crawford's. Twenty-eight of their stores 
are in the New York metropolitan area, 
three in Chicago, three in Philadelphia, 
two in Boston, and one each in Worcester, 
Syracuse, Upper Darby and Providence. 
Howard's booming $31,780,406 in net 
sales for 1947 puts it in the Big Five of the 
retail chains. 

Bond is the colossus of the clothing 
chains — the largest manufacturer of men's 
and women's clothing in the country. Its 



net sales of $83,215,404 in 1947 far sur- 
pass those of its nearest competitors. 
Its Fifth Avenue store in New York and 
its Cincinnati store in the Terrace Plaza 
hotel (pictured in a Life magazine report) 
are perhaps the two most functionally 
modem large clothing stores in the 
country. 

Bond has 59 stores in 47 cities, coast-to- 
coast. It buys time on stations in ap- 
proximately 36 cities — the leading mar- 
kets in the country. Bond has been a 
steady user of selective radio, day after 
day, year after year. It uses only 50,000 
watters, and as a rule only one station in 



each market. Musical clock programs are 
favored, but it uses a scattering of news 
programs. It never buys less than three 
times a week and shoots for nine. It 
uses marginal time, early a.m. or late p.m. 
Bond uses selective broadcast advertising 
because its greater flexibility enables it to 
hit the particular markets that it wants 
to hit at a particular time. 

Bond spends 3% of its net sales for ad- 
vertising, and about 30-40% of this bud- 
get in radio. In 1947 Bond spent close to 
$1,200,000 in radio and is currently spend- 
ing at about the same rate. 

Bond has plants in New Brunswick 




REPRESENTED BY: RADIO REPRESENTATIVES, INC. 



17 JANUARY 1949 



57 



N. J., Buffalo, and Rochester, and its 
manufacturing capacity is enormous. 
Since 22 June 1948 Bond has been seeking 
to franchise 200 men's wear stores 
throughout the United States. These 
stores will become agents for Bond 
Clothing and will adapt Bond's price, 
promotion, credit and other operational 
details. Stores must be in cities or towns 
of at least 35,000 population. 

Bond is following a trend which many 
clothing chains have been pursuing since 
the 1930's, that of locating in higher rent 
areas with larger stores. Experience has 
shown that a good location with big unit 
volume does not add proportionate 1\ more 



per unit in overhead, and is a deliverer of 
larger profits. Robert Hall is the only 
giant chain that is turning back the clock 
in tli is respect by locating in low rent 
areas. 

Bond's radio selling is a combination of 
price and institutional. Commercials are 
straight, emphasis on price and value is 
restrained. The company doesn't indulge 
in price-cutting promotions — but it is pn> 
motion minded. It heralded its Fifth 
Avenue store opening, last fall, by giving 
away a $42.50 gabardine raincoat with 
every suit bought at that price- one to a 
customer. In December, Bond dropped 
six quarter-hour news shows on WOR. 




AoeAM.-K*toael, 9*tc. radio station representatives 



AFFILIATED WITH 



KOMA 



, OKLAHOMA CITY 



This was not a retrenchment on the part 
of the chain, but merely a signal that the 
programs had served the purpose of 
plugging the new Fifth Avenue store and 
pushing the new Fall line. Bond copy is 
slanted to give the impression of saving, 
without actually mentioning anything so 
blatant as a price slash. 

Richman Brothers, with net sales in 
1947 of $38,140,000, has been using net- 
work and selective radio for the past 13 
years. For the past eight years it has only 
used selective, and at present is using 
news and sports programs on a selective 
basis in 14 of its 55 markets. Most of it« 
packages are top franchises in the indi- 
vidual market, since Richman has been 
a consistent user of radio. The 65 stores 
are located in 55 cities, most of which are 
concentrated in the Middle West and 
East. Sales gains for Richman since 1939 
have been somewhat larger than for the 
clothing industry as a whole. Their index 
for 1947 equals 233 (1939 equals 100). 

The basic appeal to the consumer is, 
"Richman Brothers Have the Values," 
because the company is organized to 
manufacture and sell on a volume-at-low- 
price basis and can afford to deliver qual- 
ity merchandise in quantity "direct from 
factory to you." Richman Brothers, like 
Bond and Howard, uses straight-selling, 
institutional copy. 

Prentis Clothes follows in the Barney* 
Robert Hall tradition of advertising. The 
small, eight-store chain, two in New York 
City and six in northern New Jersey, goes 
Barney's and Robert Hall one better. It 
not only dramatizes its operation, but 
personifies it in the fictitious character of 
Share-the-Wealth Prentis. Share-the- 
Wealth Prentis is an expansive, liberal, 
friendly personality who loves everybody 
and who wants to give a lot for a little. 
He personifies economy, and there's no 
end to the things he won't do for a cus- 
tomer. He explains that the customer at 
Prentis doesn't pay for crystal chandeliers, 
doesn't pay the middleman — Prentis 
manufactures its own clothes; and if 
you're short of cash, he'll even loan you 
money for the purchase which you can pay 
back, at no extra cost, in "tiny little pay- 
ments." 

Prentis, like Robert Hall, has turned 
its back on the trend toward larger stores 
in expensive areas. Its stores are located 
in out-of-the-way locations, decorations 
inside are plain, mostly pipe racks — it has 
two walk-up stores. The chain spends 
about $125,000 a year on three stations. 
It uses disk jockey shows on WNEW, 
New York, and WAAT, Newark. The 
chain's big program is the Bill Slater 
m.c.'d Sharc'thcAVedth Prentis give-away 



58 



SPONSOR 



An excerpt from a letter to Cleveland's 
Chief Station 




BILL O'NEIL, President 




WJW 



AJC Mfrwo/w 



CLEVELAND 



5000 Went 






ask 

Jinn Hi in: & IV 

about the 

Havens & II iiiti\ 

STATIONS I 

IN 

RICHMOND 

WHBG -** 

WCOD-™ 

■TII-TV 



First Stations in Virginia 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY «Y HEAOLEYREED COMPANY 



show on WOR every Tuesday at 8:30 p.m. 
Prentis does over $3,500,000 a year net 
sales. Joe Cohen, president of the chain, 
has built his selling philosophy around the 
premise that the small chain or independ- 
ent must meet the saturation type of ad- 
vertising with sensationalism rather than 
institutionalism — smart promotion, not 
just advertising. All announcements on 
Prentis commercials are live. In a time 
when men's clothing sales fell 20%, 
Prentis moved ahead "shockingly sub- 
stantially." 

Ripley Clothes, a chain of 14 stores in 
Boston, New York, and Philadelphia, has 
been showing signs of becoming a steady 
user of radio. The chain uses radio in 
New York only, buying recorded music 
programs on WNEW, WINS, and all the 
station breaks on WLIB. Currently, the 
chain is sponsoring wrestling matches 
every Thursday night over WPIX. 

The manufacturing-retailer chain oper- 
ations will undoubtedly continue to grow 
through radio. The savings in large scale 
production and buying are patent. In- 
ventories in proportion to total sales can 
be kept low because centrally located 
warehouses enable efficient servicing of 
many outlets. 

The independent can still appeal to the 
consumer on the basis of fashion and 
service. Petway-Reavis Company, Nash- 
ville, Tennessee, never uses a price tag in 
its commercials, but sells the advice that 
men "should dress to suit the occasion" 
and bills itself as "Headquarters for Style- 
Conscious Men" — an approach (sug- 
gested by WLAC) that quadrupled the 
; volume of business since 1936. 

In 1939 the independent retailers, in- 
cluding department stores, sold 77% of 
all men's clothing. Though that propor- 
tion has dwindled to about 70% , they still 
account for the bulk of retail sales. The 
average men's clothing retailer spends 
41.3% of his budget in radio. 

The independent retailer is more flex- 
ible than the organized clothing chain, for 
he can shift to meet changing conditions 
with far greater ease than the manufac- 
turing retailer. Should unit sales con- 
tinue to drop, the manufacturing end of I 
the manufacturing retailer may be the end 
that will hold the chain up financially. 
Whatever economic exigencies bring to 
the clothing industry as a whole, and 
manufacturing-retail chains in particular, 
one factor remains. The retailer, be he 
large or small, has a proved heritage be- 
hind him, built up by daring and original 
merchants. He has learned even more 
than national advertisers and most other 
retailers, that consistent use of radio sells 
men. * * * 



Wg?^ 



THAN ANY OTHER 

RADIO STATION 

1 



OMAHA & 
Council Bluffs 



BASIC ABC 5000 WATTS 

Represented By 
EDWARD PETRY CO., INC. 



KOI! lion; says: 

"Star -Span gird Radio is a book to 
cheer about. Its dramatic account 
of radio and ils people during the 
war is replete with anecdotes and 
lustv humor. It makes everyone in 
show business proud to have been 
part of the Hig Show over there. 
Even Bing Crosby looks good." 

JUSTIN MILLER 

President of N.A.B. adds: 
"Star-Spangled Radio deserves wide 
readership not onlv for its account 
of American radios contribution 
during World War II hut also for its 
entertaining qualities. 

STAR 

SPANGLED 

RADIO 

by Edward M. kimn and 

J \IK W . II IRRIS 

$3.50 

\t your bookstore or order direct from 
publisher 

ZIFF-DAVIS Publishing Co. 

!){."> North W abash Vvenue 
Chicago I. Illinois 






17 JANUARY 1949 



59 






BOOSTING THE SPONSOR 

(Continued from page 40) 

ands of women shoppers flocked into the 
stores to view the TV show, afterward 
staj ing to shop for the groceries they had 
heard mentioned and seen demonstrated 
in the telecast. Not only was the show an 
outstanding telecast for the sponsor, but 
it also combined the best features of a pro- 
motional campaign for the station. 

The TV program promotion outlook for 
1949 continues to show the bulk of such 
promotion being done by individual sta- 
tions. The major networks, many of 
them concerned with promoting their re- 
cent star losses (or gains) and scrambling 
around for AM business, do not consider 
TV program promotion current!) one of 
their major tasks. But already, some 
network officials are taking the cue from 
their affiliated and owned TV stations. 
They are learning that a sponsored show, 
properly promoted, means not only 
greater audiences and better impact for 
their advertiser's commercials, but a 
bettering of their over-all industry posi- 
tion. * * * 



SELLING FURNITURE 

(Continued from page 26) 

Quebec parish. During the tribute there 
was a brief description and a short history 
of the county. Later the salutes were de- 
voted each week to a different city in 
Canada. Thus to the listeners brought to 
the program because of the appeal of pood 
music well sung were added listeners who 
wanted to hear what the program had to 
say of their home parish or town. 

This promotion device, once adopted, 
has never been dropped. When it was de- 
cided in 1940 to change the character of 
the show to a talent opportunity hour, 
salutes to talent from different towns and 
parishes were substituted. The program 
traveled throughout the Province of 
Quebec with two road shows going con- 
stantly- and constantly selling the Living 
Room Furniture organization. The 
Chateau Theater, where the program 
originates, is sold out practically every 
Tuesday, the night of the broadcast, and 
generally hundreds are turned away. 

The success of the talent-hunt program 
is no accident. Between 1940 and 1948, 
10,000 auditions were given to promising 
entertainers, over 700 of whom were 
heard on the show. For three successive 
years (1944, '45, '46) the Daoust Trophy 
(French-Canadian radio's Oscar) was won 
by En Chantant Dans Le Vivoir. Canadian 
listening indices indicate that it's the 
most popular evening 15-minute show 



Contestants are not limited to the 
Province of Quebec but have come from 
as far away as Winnipeg, Nova Scotia, and 
Edmundston, N. B., in fact from wherever 
French is spoken in the Provinces. Like 
the graduates of Major Bowes' program in 
the States, winners in En Chantant talent 
searches go on to become top entertainers. 
Both on the Canadian Broadcast Com- 
pany French network and on local French 
stations, entertainers who were first heard 
on this program are regularly featured. 
Feature singers in nightclubs throughout 
Quebec owe their first chance at fame if 
not fortune (talent salaries are not too 
bountiful in Canada) to the Living Room 
talent program. 

The importance of a talent showcase 
program as a commercial vehicle cannot 
be underestimated. When NBC looked 
for a program to hold Jack Benny's pro- 
gram it turned to Philip Morris' Horace 
Heidt's Original Youth Opportunity Hour, 
which for the first broadcast aid better 
than any other program has against 
Benny in many years. Jack Benny hit 
his highest rating of the 1948-1949 season, 
27.8, while Horace Heidt's Hooperating 
was 1 1 .7. 

Finding real talent, properly presenting 
it, developing the habit of listening and 
continuously promoting the vehicle are 
certain ways to build a good commercial 
program. En Chantant has been on the 
air since 1940 in its present form. 

The success of the program is not 
questioned by U. S. furniture manufac- 
turers. What is asked is how the sponsor 
has been able successfully to market his 
product through the program. In U. S. 
there are very few national furniture lines. 
(Kroehler is one of the few.) The cost of 
shipping furniture thousands of miles 
makes it difficult for a furniture company 
to compete with locally built products. 

The Living Room Manufacturers in 
Canada haven't had to face this problem. 
The French-speaking population in 
Canada is a comparatively tight group 
centering in the Province of Quebec, al- 
though scattered also throughout the 
Eastern Provinces. Thus this furniture 
organization headed by Marcel Langelier 
hasn't had to worry about too high ship- 
ping charges. The program, being only 
1 5 minutes long, hasn't been too expensive 
and it has a family following as most 
talent opportunity programs have. The 
French-Canadian is a homebody — and he 
buys his furniture from the sponsors of 
£>i Chantant. 

The sponsorship is an interesting ex- 
ample of fitting a program to the market 
of an advertiser and then promoting the 
show for all it's worth. * * * 



LOCAL ADVERTISERS 

(Continued from page 33) 

Ray that are broadcast-advertising 
minded. The drug stores that are on the 
air use a good deal of timj but there 
aren't too many of them using time. 

While department stores generally are 
still to be converted to using the broad- 
cast medium, they rank second among re- 
tail users of air time, just as they did in 
1942. Though television is converting 
some department store diehards to the 
broadcast medium, most department 
store advertising executives are funda- 
mentally black-and-white men. They use 
what they know. Their broadcasting is 
frequently just "token" advertising. 

Important for national advertisers to 
note is that groceries, which in Sandage's 
report were included with eating and 
drinking places to attain a combined rank- 
ing of tenth (4.1% of all retail adver- 
tisers), are now third among users of the 
medium, being 8.9% of all retailers on the 
air. 

Growing importance of food stores 
using broadcast advertising is traceable to 
the increased percentage of the national 
income that is being spent for food. It is 
also traceable to the fact that so many of 
the food outlets no longer depend upon 
the sales personalities of the men behind 
the counter but are giant market (self- 
service) operations. 

Jewelers, who ranked fourth among re- 
tail advertisers in 1942, are ninth in 1948. 
In 1942 they represented 9.1% of all re- 
tailers using broadcast advertising. Dur- 
ing the past year they accounted for only 
4.2% of all retail broadcast advertisers. 

It is not possible to use any index as 
100% indicative of what a national adver- 
tiser's outlets think of broadcasting. 

Cooperative advertising allowances help 
in one case. They have no bearing in 
another. Men's clothing retailers are im- 
portant users of broadcast advertising 
(See Suit and Cloakers page 19). Never- 
theless, they rank next to the bottom of 
the list of manufacturers sharing adver- 
tising costs with their dealers (only 1.6% 
of all manufacturers in NAB's dealer- 
cooperative report). In 1942 men's wear 
ranked third (9.5%) among retailers on 
the air. In 1948 they ranked fifth (7.3%) 
among stores who sell via the air. 

No national advertiser can overlook the 
advertising his dealers use. He should 
not, however, be misled by unexplained 
figures or percentages. Sponsor prints 
its retail air advertising breakdown only 
to open the door to constructive thinking 
by national advertisers who haven't used 
this force to move their products. * * * 



60 



SPONSOR 



■0, 



oM>. 




It's an old 
^ ROMAN CUSTOM 

, . ♦ but not ours ! 




We like laurels as much as the Romans — hut not to rest on! 
Such laurels as the George Foster Peabody Award . . . the 
Advertising and Selling Gold Medal . . . and the citation of 
the National Council of English Teachers for "the program 
which did most to further listeners' understanding and ap- 
preciation of our literary heritage" ... to mention a few we've 
received . . . are an incentive for us to continue to bring good 
theatre to radio ... to make 1949 our most successful year. 

"THEATRE GUILD on the AIR'' 

Every Sunday Night -ABC network 

UNITED STATES STEEL 




STEEL 



17 JANUARY 1949 



61 



SPONSOR 
SPEAKS 



Why Two TV Comparagraphs? 

It wasn't more than two years ago 
that a television network, any network, 
seemed a mirage despite all American 
Telephone and Telegraph Company 
promises of early opening dates for its 
coaxial cable. 

The mirage has become a fact. On 
1 1 January, the East and Midwest were 
joined by coaxial cable (from Pittsburgh 
to Cleveland) and programs were pre- 
sented by not one but four TV chains 
over the cable. As though to mark this 
occasion the second issue of sponsor as 
a biweekly presents its first 4-network 
TV program Comparagraph. Unlike its 
regular radio 4'network program Com- 
paragraph, sponsor devotes one side of 
the fan-fold chart to an East and the 
other to a Midwest schedule, using 
Eastern Standard Time for one and 
Central Standard Time for the other. 
As yet the coaxial cable is one-way — 
from East to West. It will be several 
weeks before the coaxial cable becomes a 



two-way facility and permits the Midwest 
to feed programs to the East. 

The Midwest is naturally mother 
hen-ish about its TV creative ability. 
WBKB (Chicago) is a pioneer on the 
visual air and feels as do other Chicago 
TV stations that the Midwest has some- 
thing to offer America. They do not 
want to have Chicago become the step- 
child it is in radio. For the good of all 
broadcasting it were better that it never 
become just a TV way-station, a switch- 
ing point. 

There is a danger of this. There is 
more than an even chance that Holly- 
wood and New York will dominate the 
creative side of TV, just as they have 
grown to dominate the creative side of 
sound broadcasting. 

A sizable amount of dollar volume of 
commercial broadcasting originates in 
Chicago and the Midwest. Sponsors are 
therefore in a position to force the net- 
works not to ignore the Windy City. 
Broadway and Hollywood and Vine have 
dominated the entertainment world of 
America for a long time. That's because 
the rest of the U. S. has permitted this to 
happen. The greats of the theater, mo- 
tion picture world and radio were, for 
the most part, not born in New York or 
Hollywood. There's little reason why 
they have to entertain from there. 

If sponsors do nothing about it, the 
two coasts will dominate TV as they 
have all other forms of entertainment. 
sponsor in presenting two TV compara- 
graphs hopes to focus attention on the 
possibility of this dual monopoly con- 
tinuing. The Midwest deserves a chance. 

A "Different" Aid 

Much as it may disturb RCA stock- 
holders, broadcasting has had its greatest 



shot in the arm of the past decade. NBC, 
which for years has created none of its 
star programs, is now planning to com- 
pete with CBS in building entertainment 
and public service programs. Its loss of 
Jack Benny, Edgar Bergen and Charlie 
McCarthy, Amos W Andy, and the 
pending loss of perhaps two more of its 
top-rated programs is forcing NBC to 
prove that it's something more (cur- 
rently) than a fine facility for transmitting 
sponsored programs. 

Niles Trammell for years has done 
everything within his power to win the 
top programs to NBC. That he hasn't 
been able to compete in the capital-gains 
sweepstakes is no reflection on his manage- 
ment ability. There's no RCA stock- 
holder who is in the position of CBS' 
chairman of the board, William Paley, 
and who dominates CBS. Trammell 
therefore has never been in Paley 's posi- 
tion, able to do piactically what he 
wanted to without consent of the Board 
of Directors and leading stockholders. 

CBS has for years led the broad- 
casting parade, promotion wise. It has of 
more recent years built some very enter- 
taining programs. NBC didn't have to 
worry too much about promotion and 
with its commercial air virtually sold 
out, it had little time in which to build 
new personalities or programs. 

The situation is now changed. Just as 
WNBC, in order to fight WCBS and other 
New York outlets, became a personality 
under Jim Gaines (now head of NBC's 
owned and operated stations) just so 
must NBC prove that it's not 'sterile — 
promotion or programwise. 

And all broadcasting will profit. 
There'll be bigger audiences for sponsors, 
and radio will have an increased impact 
on the United States. 



Applause 



TV's Profit? 

There are few profits in television 
today. It's America's greatest red-ink 
advertising business. The profits, just 
as in the early days of radio, are almost 
entirel) in the home receiver manufactur- 
ing business and in the manufacturing ol 
TV appliances (lenses, antennas, carrying 
cases, etc.) 

A number of advertisers using the 
medium is finding it profitable. There 
is a greater number buying TV time 



(see 4-network Program Comparagraph 
and TV Trends in this issue) without any 
expectation of direct sales results at this 
stage of the art's development. They 
have joined station operators, program 
builders, and thousands of creative men, 
in making their contributions towards 
building, a new mass communications 
medium. 

Of course practically everyone in TV 
expects to collect upon television's pos- 
sibilities eventually. What sponsor 
wants to applaud is the American Way, 
the willingness of a people to gamble 



millions on the future of a business. 

It isn't only the station owners, the 
advertisers, and the agencies who are 
gambling. There are literally thousands 
(and there will be thousands more) of 
ordinary men and women, boys and girls, 
who are investing their time and dollars 
in the belief that TV is the great art and 
business of tomorrow. 

In no country in the world, besides 
the U. S., are so many willing to risk so 
much on the future. This is what has 
made the nation great. This is what will 
make TV great. 



62 



SPONSOR 



Listeners In Kansas City's Primary Trade Area 

VOTE FOR 

1U KMBC-KFRM Icam 



The first Area Radio Study of The Kansas City Primary 
Trade Area shows The KMBC-KFRM Team far in the lead 
of all hroadcasters heard in the area. Made in the fall of 
1948 by Conlan & Associates, this study is believed to be 
the largest coincidental survey of its kind ever conducted. 
Factual data from this survey of more than 100,000 calls 
is published in three books — The KMBC-KFRM Team 
Area Study (Kansas City Primary Trade Area), the KMBC 
Area Study, and the KFRM Area Study. 

These Area studies which cover 8 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. 
throughout one week, (KFRM is a daytime station) ending 
in early October, exclude the larger cities: both Kansas 
City's (Missouri and Kansas) St. Joseph, Topeka, Salina, 



Hutchinson and Wichita, surveys for all of which have 
been made by Conlan. 

The KMBC Area Study proves KMBC is the 
most listened to station (daytime) within an aver- 
age radius of slightly over 100 miles from Kan- 
sas City! 

The KFRM Area Study proves KFRM is the 
most listened to (daytime) station in Kansas within 
KFRM's half-millivolt contour! (KFRM is a day- 
time station.) 



KMBC Area Survey 



KFRM Area Surrey 




17.1 



12.5 



KMBC-KFRM Team 
Area Survey 

Konsos City Primary 

Trade Area) 



6.7 



6.6 



5.0 



4.6 




Station K A B C D E F Station K A B C D E F Station K A D C K D E 

F M M F 

R B BR 

M C CM 

These graphs illustrate the percentage of total audience of KMBC and KFRM, as de- 
termined by the Conlan survey, in comparison to the other leading stations of the area. 



There were 73 Kansas, 5 Oklahoma and 4 Nebraska 
counties included in the KFRM Area Survey, (Wichita, 
Salina, Hutchinson excluded) with a population of 1,011,- 
750; all within KFRM's half-millivolt contour. 

In the KMBC Area Survey there were 61 counties, (Kan- 
sas City, Mo., Kansas City, Kansas, St. Joseph, Topeka ex- 
cluded) ; all within KMBC's half-millivolt daytime contour. 

In the KMBC-KFRM Area Survey for the Kansas City 
Primary Trade area, as defined by Dr. W. D. Bryant, now 



KMBC 

OF KANSAS CITY 



research director for the 10th Federal Reserve District, 
there were 135 counties, with a total population of 2,099,- 
531; all counties being within the half-millivolt daytime 
contours of KMBC-KFRM. (Metropolitan areas named 
were excluded.) 

Only The KMBC-KFRM Team delivers complete cover- 
age of the great Kansas City Trade area! The KMBC- 
KFRM Team provides the most economical circulation an 
advertiser can buy to cover this huge, important trade area. 




Represented Nationally by 
FREE & PETERS, INC. 



KFR 



For Kansas Farm Coverage 



OWNED AND OPERATED BY MIDLAND BROADCASTING COMPANY 




760 



Attention Time Buyers and Advertising Managers: 
Talk about POWER AND RESULTS— one program pulled 
1 7,1 29 letters at one o'clock in the morning. We would 
be glad to give you the particulars. Write to us. 



Pepreienled 



PETRY 



I 



THE GOODWILL STATION, INC. fisher bldg DETROIT 



A. RICHARDS 

Chairman of fh« Board 



FRANK E. MULLEN 

Pretidtnt 






■ 



HARRY WISMI 

Attl. lo the Pr* 



OIT I 

ISMER 

r.lid.nt 



II JANUARY 1949 • $8.00 a Year 



TV results -p. 66 

i, Why sponsors change programs — p. 19 

NBC GtNB?AL r LIBRARY 

Once a year — p. 32 

Commercials wilh a plus — p. 28 





Mastery in the air combines experience, 
skill, initiative, and split-second timing. 

Who on the Virginia broadcast scene best 
epitomizes these qualities? 

Who but WMBG . . . first in Virginia to broadcast 
a commercial program, first to broadcast 
during the daylight hours, first to install a 
merchandising department, holder of many firsts. 

Who but WTVR ... the South's first television 
station, first in the nation to sign an 
NBC affiliated contract. 

Who but the Havens & Martin Stations, 
FIRST STATIONS OF VIRGINIA. 




WMBG am 
WTVR tv 
WCOD fm 



&//jj/ C//f///rj/.) ^/ y*/jy/»rW 



Havens and Martin Stations, Richmond 20, Va. 
John Blair & Company, National Representatives 
Affiliates of National Broadcasting Company 




TS... SPONSOR REPORTS.. 




RECEIVED 

FEB 1 1949 

NBC GENERAL LIBRARy 



..SPONSOR REPORT 



Advertisers, not 
stations, must save 
BMB 



Clear channel broad- 
casters start cutting 
farm programing 



Yankee Web plans 
call for decentraliz- 
ation 



Admiral TV show on 
two webs because of 
shared coaxial cable 



D-F-S again leads 
agencies using net- 
works 



Small agencies be- 
coming factor in 
TV placement 



31 January 1949 

It's up to advertisers and advertising agencies to force continuance 
of Broadcast Measurement Bureau surveys. Stations and networks 
that are paying bills are no longer sold on BMB research; and 
u ndercover h a cking at Bureau is tremendous. If BMB is to be saved, 
it will have to be buyers, not sellers, of broadcast advertising who 
will have to be firemen. 

-SR- 

Many clear channel stations are quietly axing farm service broadcast 
programs. Policy decision is to leave this field to stations with 
major rural audiences. In New York, WNBC and WOR have cut early 
a.m. farm airings, and policy will be followed out by clear channel 
broadcasts in other metropolitan centers. 

-SR- 

Long term planning is in works at Yankee Network to revitalize owned 
and managed station operation. Change will be gradual but the 
"clear-everything-with-Boston" routine is on way out. Transit-radio 
a nd other exp a nsion plans at local levels are important in future 
o f Yankee, and local autonomy is essential. 

-SR- 

Admiral Corporation's "Broadway Revue" is being seen over two net- 
works, not because Admiral particularly wants to buy two stations 
in so many cities (8) , but because only by telecasting it on both 
NBC and DuMont is it possible for sponsor to network program. 
Coaxial cable is shared by two webs on Friday nights. 

-SR- 

Importance of daytime serial broadcasting is indicated by fact that 
in 1948 for 15th year Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, Inc., led the 
agencies using network time for clients. D-F-S billing was twice 
that of number 2 agency, J. Walter Thompson, which billed 
$10,399,023. If program costs were included in agency tabulation, 
rank order might change since daytime talent cost is low and night- 
time high. Latter frequently costs twice time fees. 

-SR- 

Small agencies, seldom a vital factor in national radio advertising, 
are emerging as important in TV. Firms like Jackson and Company 
(N.Y.) with number of home furnishing accounts are already placing 
more national selective TV business than radio. Jackson has Thibaut 
Wallpaper on six stations, with many more in view, and expects 
that TV is bound to change wallpaper and fabric advertising. 



SPONSOR, Volumes. No. 5. .{/ January 1949. Published every other Monday by SPONSOR Publications Inc. 32nd and Elm. Baltimore, 

Maryland, idvertising, Editorial. Circulation Offices III West .)!' Street. \eu ) orl I". \ .) . J8 a year in I ,S. x " elsewhere. Application 

for entry as se< ond class matter is pending. 



31 JANUARY 1949 



I 



REPORTS. . .SPONSOR RE PORTS. .. SPONSOR R' 



Consumer surveys 
desired by national 
advertisers 



Joske's rates third in 
NRDGA contest 



Network effectiveness 
changing 



Men still vital in 
consumer buying 
habits, says Crossley 



Westinghouse claims 
its stratovision 
commercially ready 



National advertisers reliance on surveys by local newspaper-radio 
stations on consumer preferences was recently indicated when Detroit 
News (WWJ, WWJ-TV) announced it would drop its consumer survey. 
Over 90% of members of ANA (Association of National Advertisers) 
"regretted" announcement. 

-SR- 

Although Joske's (San Antonio, Texas) was the test store in the NAB 
(National Association of Broadcasters) department store promotion, 
it ran third among department store sponsorship of "general family" 
programs, and third among sponsors of women's programs in recent 
NRDGA (National Retail Dry Goods Association) radio advertising 
competition. First in family classification was the Hecht Company 
(Washington, D.C.), while first in women's program group was Ed. 
Schuster of Milwaukee, Wise. Joske's also ran third in the farm 
program classification with first going to Guggenheimer' s of Lynch- 
berg, Va. 

-SR- 

How network effectiveness has changed in areas where all four webs 
can be heard with equal quality can best be attested by the 2-8 
January Hooperating report. On Sunday afternoons (12-6 p.m.) Mutual 
averaged an 8.2 rating, 2.2 points ahead of second network (NBC) . 
In mornings, Monday through Friday, (8-12 a.m.) CBS averaged 2.6 
points better than second web (ABC) , which had 4.3 average. In 
afternoons, Mondays through Fridays, NBC was 1.1 ahead of the second 
network, CBS, which rated 5.2. In total evening rating (Mondays 
through Sundays) CBS was leader with .3 of a point ahead of second 
placer, NBC, which averaged 11.2 for the course. NBC still leads on 
Tuesdays (15.1), Wednesdays (12.9), and Saturdays (11.1). ABC is 
first on Fridays (10.3) and a close second on Sundays and Wednesdays. 

-SR- 

Figures of a recent (1948) survey by Argosy (men's) magazine tend to 
offset surveys made on the buying importance of women. Men reported 
to Crossley (research) that they influenced buying of cars (91%), 
life insurance (85%), air conditioning (76%), television sets (75%), 
and movie cameras (74%) . Male surveyees admitted that they had 
little influence on buying of washing machines (24%) , vacuum 
cleaners (29%) , dish washers (29%) , and electric blankets (31%) . 
They reported however that, believe it or not, 3.3% owned electric 
blankets to 0.8% owning telvision receivers. FM set owners, in the 
3,039 personally interviewed panel, represented 4.2%. 

-SR- 

Despite fact that no plane has been built especially for strato- 
vision transmission from high flying planes of television programs, 
Westinghouse engineers claim that their experiments in conjunction 
with Glenn Martin aircraft organization have proved that strato- 
vision is ready for commercial use. Feeling at Federal Communica- 
tions Commission does not go along with Westinghouse at this stage 
of development. 



SPONSOR 



out of 




radio listeners in the booming Magic Circle land 
live in KCMO's listening area... 



Talk about a bonus in listenership . . . 
you just can't beat KCMO's 50,000 watt 
coverage of Mid -America and Roger 
Babson's famous Magic Circle land! 

Three out of four . . . yes, three out of 
every four persons in the Magic Circle 
live in KCMO's listening area . . . based 
on mail response. That's a population 
of over 11,560,000 persons! Almost 
half this audience— 5,435,000— is inside 
KCMO's measured H-millivolt area 
(213 Mid-America counties). There's 
nothing small about that! 

To sell the Magic Circle's farm-and- 
factory-rich millions, center your selling 
on KCMO— Kansas City's most 
powerful station for Mid-America 
in the Magic Circle! 



50,000 WATTS DAYTIME— Non-Directional 
10,000 WATTS NIGHT— 810 kc. 





KCMO 



and KCFM . . . 94.9 Megacycles 
KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI 

Basic ABC for Mid -America 



ONE station 
ONE set of call letters 
ONE spot on the dial 
ONE rate card 



National Representative: 
JOHN E. PEARSON COMPANY 

•KCMO Listening Area Shaded area indicates KCMO 
mail response ounties (476 counties in 6 states). 



31 JANUARY 1949 



VOL 3 W>. S 



31 ||NU» WW 



SPONSOR REPORTS 

40 WEST 52ND 

ON THE HILL 

NEW AND RENEW 

MR. SPONSOR: DONALD DANFORTH 

P. S. 

WHY SPONSORS CHANGE PROGRAMS 

OHRBACHS 

TV RESEARCH 

BROADCASTING AND THE BROKER 

COMMERCIALS PLUS 

PROGRAM PRODUCERS' LAMENT 

ONCE A YEAR 

MR. SPONSOR ASKS 

SELECTIVE TRENDS 

4-NETWORK PROGRAM COMPARAGRAPH 60 

CONTESTS AND OFFERS 65 

TV RESULTS 66 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 70 

APPLAUSE 70 




Published even othei Mondaj by SPONSOR PUB- 
LICATIONS INC. Executive, Edito ial, and Uvei 
tisiiin Offices: 40 West ' SI reet, New N oi 
N. Y. Telephone: Plaza 3-6216. Chi.'..'-. "Hi., 

M ichiga ri Avenue, felephoni in :ial 

Publication Office : 8 !nd and Kim, Bal- 
timore, Md., Su1 United States .$8 ii 
1 i i : iii Oi Printed in 
U. S. \. Ci 1949 SPONSOR PUBLICA- 
TIONS INC. 

i Norman K. Glenn, 

i I • i ii Glenn, Edi 

tor: Joseph M. Koehli ti Editoi I 

( lharles Sinclai r. .1 e me Carr, Re- 
i : Stella Bri mi Vrl Dii ecto I : 

Direct i I Blum- 

ini hal. Ad' ■ 'l lepartmenl : M. II I • i ■ 

(Chicago Manager) Jerrj Glynn -1 1 . : (Lo An 
Scot! S Co., 148 S. Hill 
Duncai '"..Mills 

Bldg. Circulation Manager: Milton Ka 

< OVER I'M l i RE: Hai rj S. Trui i ujrura- 

tion a Pn rlenl ol I he i i new 

mile tone in 'I V hi tory. This is what lh<- • 
'■.•mghi a pa rade appn l review in; tntl 






40 West 52nd 



CANCELLATION PROBLEM 

1 have read with interest the recent 
"pro and con" letters on station pro- 
motion of commerical accounts, and 
was so impressed by the logic and 
reasonableness of Hal Davis" letter 
l December SPONSOR I that I saved it 
with the intention of quoting from it 
in one of my regular reports to sta- 
tion clients. 

Then one of the major soap com- 
panies suddenly cancelled a nation- 
wide selective campaign on the usual 
two weeks' notice. Undoubtedly the 
action was dictated by economic con- 
sideration which could not be dis- 
regarded and was in conformity with 
the best principles of successful con- 
sumer advertising. It hurt — but of 
course it couldn't be helped. 

But what about the promotional 
effort which had been requested of the 
stations? (Remember this was selec- 
tive — not network. I Dealer letters, 
essay contests, point-of-sale merchan- 
dising, extra courtesy announcements, 
jingle contests, studio interviews with 
district managers on feature programs 
such as the daily women's hour, Mer- 
chants on Parade, Shopper's Guide. 
etc. — all were involved. 

Could the momentum created by all 
this promotional effort be cut off on 
two weeks' notice? 

In response to station reports of 
such activity the client wrote glowing 
words of praise — letters of congratula- 
tion to staff members who participated 
in the promotion and formal compli- 
ments to station managers who organ- 
ized it. 

In some cases these encomiums, to- 
gether with special photographs of 
I > i < >< 1 1 1< 1 displays and contest winners, 
were published in the January issue 
of station newsletters and house organs 
which, as you know, have wide com- 
munitj circulation, ^i el the stations 
no longer have a broadcast order on 
the product. Furthermore, the) were 
given to understand that the campaign 
had been so successful thai il would 
be possible to open up new marki ts 
with the budget left over as a resull 
of the cancellation. 

Ii doesn't lake verj much imagina- 
tion to arrive .it the conclusion that 

perhaps the stations lost 1 1 1 < • i i sch( d- 

iiirs because the) did a good promo- 
i Please turn to page 36 > 




WITH 



WHBQ 



56 



FIRST ON 
YOUR RADIO 



in Memphis, Tennessee 

5,000 WATTS 
20 TIMES MORE POWERFUL 



/£? 



Million More 
listeners! 



Mr. Time Buyer: 
Here are the 
Vital Statistics 

* Population served by 
WHBQ — 2,544,500 

• Retail Sales $132,251,500 
£ Radio Homes 551,353 

BMB and Sales Management Figures 

Write, Wire or Phone 
for Availabilities 




Represented by 

THE WALKER CO. 




CHICAGO'S 
OST POWERFUL 
COMBINATION! 




REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY AVER Y-KN O DEL 




Candy Eating Off 

Although the candy industry passed the billion-dollar mark 
in 1948 I SI. 050,000,000 at wholesale figures), the con- 
sumption per capita, according to the Department of Com- 
merce, started tapering off during the year. This is reason 
win some candy manufacturers dropped their broadcast 
advertising schedules. However, candy industry is plan- 
ning concerted campaign to advertise candy eating both 
with "food" and "taste'" appeals. Three great candy firms, 
one of which has never used broadcast advertising, are con- 
sidering television campaigns at present and two will return 
to the air this Spring. 

Oil Available in Abundance 

As indicated in sponsor's Fall Facts edition last Summer, 
oil is in abundant siip|il\. and more and more money is 
being spent to advertise its availability. At the time of 
sponsor's exclusive forecast, oil was announced as being in 
light supply for Fall 1948, but the official oil industry state- 
ments have been proved incorrect. Only oil product still 
scarce is special fuel for fast-flying planes and new fuels 
being used to power secret war devices. 

Women's Clothing Up Towards End of 1948 

Though Christmas was slow, the dress, suit, and coat in- 
dustry reported (Bureau of Census) that the third-quarter 
of 1948 showed an increase in women's outwear shipments 
from New York of 19%. This represented an increase of 
$122,000,000 over 1947. New York ships 70% of the na- 
tion's total of women's clothing. 

NAM to Go Commercial on Air 

The National Association of Manufacturers' decision to 
switch to commercial broadcasting is based upon fact 
that NAM feels it'll have to do some hard hitting at labor's 
requested fourth round of increases. Since labor will be 
- 1 r • - - 1 1 1 •_ ■ $I00-a-moiith pensions in addition to wage in- 
creases. Association feels thai it wouldn't be permitted to 
say anything it wanted to. on a sustaining program. 
There'll be no hold- haired <>n the new NAM program. 

War Taxes to be Fought 

Both labor and management will combine to light a nuni- 
bet "f taxes which wire placed during war to force reduc- 



tion of use of scarce items. These include railway travel, 
long distance telephone calls, theater seats, night club 
attendance, etc. Thus far, very little that's constructive has 
been done to get the war-inspired taxes reduced. Enter- 
tainment unions, railway's "Big Four," and even loosely 
organized telephone company employees, are now talking 
"going to the people," via broadcast advertising. Capitol 
Hill doesn't want to cut any taxes, knowing that if it does 
it will have to impose new ones to replace those repealed, 
and that means even more headaches than keeping the war- 
taxes on the books. 

Touring Industrial Shows Have Official O.K. 

Touring industrial shows like Westinghouse's March of 
Research, General Motors' New Products, and General 
Electric's untitled presentation, will have the blessing of 
official Washington. Congressmen and senators will try to 
attend openings in their local areas and in big metropolitan 
centers, personalities like ex-President Hoover (N.Y.) will 
attend presentation. Idea is that government wants indus- 
try to try some "sell," and will back all attempts to do it. 

When Does "Manufacturing" Start? 

Some department in Washington has to watch over con- 
sumer interests. Federal Trade Commission has acted 
the part for years, but is currently in the position of what 
constitutes a "manufactured product" and what is a "na- 
tural product." When problems like this present them- 
selves it's better that a clerk decide than a top commis- 
sioner. The clerk may be correct, and the decision affects 
the cost of living for everyone throughout the nation. 

Consumer vs. "Public" Interest 

Greatest problem in Washington is what's in the "consumer 
interest" and what's in the "public interest." On the sur- 
face, "consumer" and "public" are the same; in operation, 
there's a world of difference between them. "Consumer" 
means just what the name implies. "Public." on the other 
hand, includes the source, as well as the man who con- 
sumes. The larger concept unfortunatelv frequently does 
not include the smaller. 

Coal Selling a Problem 

Coal isn't being sold effectively, except by D&H (Delaware 
& Hudson) and Blue (D.L.&W.) coal companies. Result is 
that John L. Lewis is wondering if it wouldn't be good 
policy for his miners to do some selling and to prove to 
coal companies that they don't know their business. Two 
networks are considering bids by Lewis union on time 
purchase. 

Home Construction at High 

Construction is at a record high, despite fact that it isn't 
half of what it should be. Over one billion and a third 
was spent to build homes in December, bringing 1948 con- 
struction investment to $17,660,000,000. Half of what was 
spent, according to Department of Commerce, was trace- 
able to increased costs, but half was actual increase over 
a year ago. Broadcast publicity is now focused on new 
homes, which means increased dollars to construction 
industry. 



SPONSOR 



lii n«'\< issue: "Outlook", the nr« SI'OVNOII feature 



pouieR 

POUM 

vomit 



50,000 uiatts off 
it daytime, 10,000 
night 



where the people 
are, in fast-growing, 
rich South Florida 



to do the biggest 
single selling job 
in all Florida 



\UGBS 




FLORIDA'S ONLY 50,000 WATT STATION 

\ Represented by Katz 



31 JANUARY 1949 



GROWING 




ARKETS 



Growing markets arc attractive places in which to spend 
advertising dollars, especially now when every advertising 
dollar must do its capacity job. That's one reason why 
discriminating advertisers are concentrating on Southwestern 
markets. No other section of the United States can show, 
month after month, the increases which are regularly setting 
new records in Tulsa and in other Southwestern markets. 
Check the Federal Reserve, Department of Commerce, or 
your own sales figures for the Southwest and you'll see why 
this area continues to be the best place for 1949 advertising 
concentration! 

In 1949 take full advantage of booming markets by using 
Oklahoma's Greatest Station, KVOO, whose 50,000 watts 
and long established, faithful audience is an unbeatable 
combination to get maximum sales results in the Southwest. 



EDWARD PETRY & COMPANY INC., NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 

NBC AFFILIATE UNLIMITED TIME 




SPONSOR 



,7 JAM tHY 1949 




New National Selective Business 



New and renew 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT 



AGENCY 



STATIONS 



CAMPAIGN, start, duration 



American Home Foods, Irtc 
American Safety Razor Corp 

Fisherman's Gadgct-Of-The- 

Month Club, Inc 
General Motors Corp 

( hevrolet Motor Div) 
Lever Brothers Co 

i Pepsodent Div) 
I.ewyt Corp 

Olney & Carpenter 

RCA-Victor I>i> of Radio 

Corp of America 
Re-Dan Packing Co 

Ku-Tel Co 

Salitrate Co 

(distr by McKesson & 

Robbins, Inc) 
Southgate Foods 

Studehaker Corp 

TruVal Manufacturers, Inc 



Duff's Daking Mixes W. Karl Bothwcll 
(Pittsburgh) 



Gem Push-Pak 
Dispenser 

Fishing gear 



Federal (N. Y.) 



1949 Chevrolet 

Rayve Home 

Permanent 
Vacuum cleaners 



h.t\ is-Harrison- 

Simmonds (L. A.) 
Campbell- Kwald 

(Detroit) 
.1. Walter Thompson 

(Chicago i 
Hicks & Greist 
(N. V.) 
< In cm -ii ( ks, snack Fuller & Smith & 

items Ross (N. J.) 

45 RPM records J. Walter Thompson 

(N. Y.) 
Cadel Dog Food Lee-Murray (N. Y.) 

Drug products Louis A. Smith 

(Chicago) 
Citrate of magnesia Lawrence Fertig 

(N. Y.) 



Red Mill Peanut W. Wallace Orr 

Butter (Phila.) 

1949 Studehaker Roche. Williams & 

Cleary (Chicago) 
TruVal shirts McCann-Krickson 

(N. Y.I 

'Station list set at present, although more man be added later. 
{Fifty-two weeks generally means « 13-week contract with options for s 
of ami 13-week period) 



20-30 
(limited natl campaign) 

50-60 

(Limited natl campaign) 

210 

I Natl campaign) 

100-150 

Natl campaign ) 

90 

(Natl campaign) 

75-100 

(Natl campaign, some co-op) 

H-10 

I i stern mktsi 

.".0-100 

(Natl campaign) 

10-15* 

I Eastern mkt> i 

12 

(Midwestern test I 

i-:t 

(Test. Syracuse, N. Y.) 

S 

(N. C.I and Va. ABC stas) 

73 

(Natl campaign) 

30 

(Limited natl campaign) 



Partic in homemaker prgms; Jan. 

15; 13 wks 
E.t. ^iiots. annemts; aht Apr 1; 13 

wks 
Loral prgms, li\e spots; aht Mar 1: 

13 wks 
Live, e.t. spots, annemts; aht Jan 

22; 13 wks 
E.t. spots, annemts; Jan 31; 3-6 

wks 
Live spots, annemts; Jan 21 thru 

Sep 1949 
Live spots, annemts; Jan 15; 13 

wks 
Live, e.t. spots, annemts; Jan-Feb; 

13 wks 
Live, e.t. spots; Jan 2(1; 13 wk- 

Live spots; Jan 14; 13 wks 

Live, e.t. spots; Jan 17; s «ks 



Breakfast in Hollywood (co-op) ; 

TuTh 1-1:30 pm; Jan 11; 16 wks 
Live 10-min, 15-min newscasts ;i . 

sched; Jan 21; 13 wks 
E.t. spots, annemts; Mar 1; 13 wks 



successive is-weel renewals. It's subject to cancellation at U 



Ifl^J New and Renewed Television (Network and Selective) 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



STATION 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



American Chicle Co 

Admiral Radio & TV Corp 

American Tobacco Co 
P. Ballantine & Sons 

Botany Worsted Mills 

General Foods Corp 

(Maxwell House Coffee) 

Garrett & Co 

(Va. Dare Wines) 

Illinois Meat Co (Broadcast 
Corned Beef Hash) 

Kellogg Co 

Liggett & Meyers 

Mason, Au & Maggenheimer 

Philip Morris ,V Co 

Bulova Watch Co 



BVD Corp 

Celomat Corp 

(Vu-Scope TV Lensl 
E. L. Cournand Co 

(Walco TV Lens) 
Allen B. DuMont Labs 

Kdelbrew Brewery 
Pioneer Scientific Corp 
(Polaroid TV Filter) 



RCA-Victor Div of Radio 
Corp of America 



Badger and Browning & 


WNBT. N. Y. 


Herscv 




Kudner 


NBC-TV net and 




DuMont TV net 


N. W. Ayer 


WPIX. N. Y. 


J. Walter Thompson 


CBS-TV net 


Silberstein-Goldsmith 


KTI.A. L. A. 




WBKB, Chi. 


Benton & Bowies 


NBC-TV net 


Ruthrauff & Ryan 


WCBS-TV, N. Y. 


Arthur Meyerhoff 


DuMont TV net 


Kenyon & Kckhardt 


ABC-TV net 


Newell-Emmett 


WENR-TV, Chi. 


Moore & Hamm 


NBC-TV net 


Biow 


WXY/.-TV, Detr. 




WNBT, N. Y. 


Biow 


WNBT, N. Y. 




WNBQ, Chi. 




KNBH, Holly. 


Grey 


KNBH, Holly. 


Tracy-Kent 


WCBS-TV, N. Y. 




H PTZ, Phila. 


(ay ton 


KTLA, L. A. 


Geyer, Newell & Ganger 


DuMont TV net 


Gordon & Mattern 


ABC-TV net 


Carton 


\\ 1 MI-TV, Chi. 




WNBT, N. > . 


J. Walter Thompson 


NBC-TV net 



Film annemts; Jan 5; 52 wks (n) 

Admiral Broadway Revue; Fri 8-9 pm; Jan 2s ; 52 wks (n) 

Film spots; Dec 27; 13 wks (r) 

Tournament of Champions; Wed nights as sched; Jan 19; 1 5 
wks (n) 

Weather spots, annemts; Jan 30; 13 wks (r) 

Lambs Gambol; Sun s : 3o-!i pm; Feb 27; 13 weeks (n) 

Film spots; Jan 17; 13 wks (n) 

Amanda; Th 12-12:15 pm; Jan 27; 13 wks (n) 

Singing Lady; Sun 6:30-7 pm; Feb 13; 52 wks (n) 

Film spots; Jan 1; 40 wks (r) 

Howdy Doody, Wed 5:45-6 pm; Jan 12; 13 wks (n) 

Film spots; Jan 14; 52 wks nil 

Film spots; Dec 15; 52 wks (n) 

Time annemts; Jan 16; 11 wks (n) 

Time annemts; Jan 14, 52 wks (n) 

Time annemts; Jan 16; 52 wks (n) 

F'ilm annemts; Jan 17; 26 wks (n) 

Film spots; Jan 11; 13 wks (n) 

Film spots; Jan 4; 13 wks (n) 

Film partic wkly in wrestling hoots; Jan 19; 13 »k- (n 

Gus Edwards Schooldays; Tu 9-9:30 pm; Jan LS; 13 wks (n) 
Your Magic Window; Th 9-9:30 pm; Jan 20; 13 wks (n) 

Bowling Headliners; Sun 10:30-10:45 pm; Feb 13; 52 wks . > i > 

Film spots; Jan 14; 52 wks (n) 

Film spots in "Hopalong Cassidy." Sun aft as sched; Dec "> ; 
26 wks (n) 

Film spots; Feb 13; 13 wks (n) 

Junior Jamboree; MTWTF 7-7:30 pm; Jan 12; 13 »k. (n) 



• In next issue: New ami Iteneweil on Networks, Sponsor Per- 
sonnel Change*. National llronileast Sale* Executive Changes. 

New Agenev Appointments 



K. J. Reynolds Tobacco ("o Esty 



Peter Paul, Inc 
Piquot Mills 
Uanger Joe Cereal Co 
P. J. Hitler Co 

(food products) 
Ronson Art Metal Works 
>. A. Schoenbrunn & Co 

(Savarin Coffee) 
A. Stein & Co 

I Paris garters) 
Toy Guidance Council 
Wit ner Co i « allpaper) 
Whelan Drug Stores 
Zippy Products, Inc 



Platte-Forbes 
J. D. Tardier 
Geare-Marston 

Clements 

Cecil & Presbrey 
Gumbinner 

Louis A. Smith 



Keiss 

Jackson 

Stanton 



H. Fisher 



Martin & Andrew 



V, (,N-r\ . ( hi. 
\\( BS I A .N.I. 
WCAl TV. Phil... 
W MAR-TV, Balto. 
WOK -TV, Wash. 
WNAC-TV. Host. 
W.IBK-TV. Detr. 
WFWS. Cleve. 
WTMJ-TV. Milw. 
WSPD-TV. Toledo 
WPTZ, Phila. 
WCBS-TV, N. Y. 
WPTZ, Phila. 
WMAL-TV, Wash. 

WPTZ, Phila. 
WCBS, N. Y. 

ABC-TV net 

ABC-TV net 
WENR-TV, Chi. 
DuMont TV net 
WPIX, N. Y. 



Advertising Agency Personnel Changes 



Golden Gloves Tournament; five telecasts as sched hetw Feb 21 
and May I* (station list varies each event); (n) 



Film spots; Jan 4; 13 wka (n) 
Film spots; Jan 4; 13 wks (n) 
Film spots; Jan 4; 13 wks (n) 
Film spots; Jan 24; 13 wks (n) 

Film anncmts; Jan 3; 26 wks (r) 
Film spots; Feb 1; 13 wks (n) 

Identify; Mon 9-9:l."i pm; Feb 14; 52 wks <n) 

Hooray For Play; Sun 6-6:30 pm; Mar 6; 52 »k- n 

Film spots; Feb 17; 13 wks (n) 

Hotel Broadway; Th 8:30-9 pm; Jan 20; 13 wks (n) 

Film spots; Feb 1; 52 wks (n) 




NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



George T. Bixby 
Robert Bragarnick 
B. E. Bnrrell 

Cecil Carnes 
Philip A. Cleland 
Francis li. Cole 
John K. (rain 
Fred Crawshaw 
Robert Wolrott Day 
Milton Decker 
French L. Fasiin 
Edward Felbin 
George F. Finley 
Fdward R. Fitzgerald 

Norine Freeman 
Edward A. Grossfeld 
lack W. K. Harger 
Bess Harrison 
lack lleggie 
George E. Howard 
Snowden M. Hunt Jr. 
Richard Ide 
David N. Jones 
Ralph I). Kanna 
Minnie Kaplan 
Nicholas Keesclv 
Jack Kerr 
Noran E. Kersta 
Philip Klein 
Mni ton Koshland 
Hill Learj 
Scott Leonard 
Stephen P. Lewis 
James R. Lunke 
Byron Page Lyman 
Russell F. Manney 
Loise Mark 
Craig Maudslcy 
John J. McSweeney 
Brew ster Morgan 
John A. Mullen 

William M. Oulster 

Albert E. Pacini 
Lillian F. Parker 
Raymond Perry 
Curt A. Peterson 
Donald J. Powers 
Norma Rathner 
Thomas J. Richards 
Herbert Ringold 
Sidney Rosendorf 
Harrj R. Schreier 
L. Scott 

w.iltei E. Sickles 
Lestei M. Strong 
John C. Strouse 
Gilman Sullivan 
Read Hamilton Wiglil 
Hal Wolff 
I eonard R. Woodruff 



Bixby-Hanaway, Providence R. I., partner 

Dancer-Fit/gerald-Sample, N. Y. 

Submarine Signal Co, Boston, adv mgr 

Radio producer 

Benton & Bowles, N. v., acct exec 

Russell T. Gray, Chi., acct exec 

Buchen, Chi. 

Garfield & Guild, S. F., vp, sr acct exec 

John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Co, Boston 

Fuller & Smith <v Ross, N. Y. 

L. W. Ramsey, Chi., vp 

Philip Klein, Phila.. radio dept 

Federal, N. V., prodn mgr 

J. Walter Thompson, Chi., prodn control dept 

head 
W. B. Doner, Chi., pub rel dir 
Kuttner & Kuttner, Chi. 
Caterpillar Tractor Co, S. F., western adv rep 

Alford R. Poyntz, Toronto, acct exec- 
Harry E. Foster, Toronto 
Hear Creek Orchards, Ore., adv mgr 
Brisacher, Wheeler, N. V., art dir 
Coca-Cola Corp, N. Y-, adv mgr 
WONS, Hartford Conn., mgr 

Lennen .Si Mitchell, N. V., radio dept mgr 

Kerr Glass Co, L. A., adv dir 

NBC, N. Y.. exec asst to vp in chge TV 

Philip Klein. Phila., pres 

Philip Klein, Phila., acct exec 



Deutsch A. Shea, N. V.. radio dil 



BBD&O. N.V., acct exec 

Mark, Mautner & Herman, Milw., exec vp 

John E. Pearson, N. V., slsman 

Compton, N. Y. 

Doherty, Clifford & Shenfield, N. Y.. radio copy 



Quality Park, Mnpls. 
Hixson-O'Donnell, N. Y., space buyer 

Marsrhalk & Pratt, N. Y.. radio dir 

< 'allies, Chi., arcl exec 

MGM, H'wood. 

WSOY. Decatui III. 

Philip Klein, Phila.. radio dir 

Morton Freund. N. ^ . 

L. E. McGivcna, N. Y., vp 

McCarty, L. A., acct exec 

United Broadcasting Corp, Chi., gen mgr 

Young .V Rubicam, N. Y., acct exec 
Federal, N. Y., accl exec 
ABC, N. Y.. TV sis dept 
NIK , H'wood. 

.1. F. Mulkey Co, Detroit, sis mgr 



Geoge R. Bixby (new), Providence R. I., head 

Blow, N. Y'., acct exec 

Sutherland Abbott, Boston, acct exec 

li nil ii.iii . Houston Tex., radio dir 

Same, vp 

C. B. Juneau, L. A., acct exec 

Charles R. Stuart, S. F., acct exec 

Young & Rubicam, S. F.. acct exec 

II. B. Humphrey, N. Y-, TV dir, radio acct exec 

Biow, N. Y., acct ever 

Fletcher D. Richards, Chi., mgr 

Same, radio dir 

Same, vp 

Same, timebuyer 

Same, radio, TV dir 

Fdward A. Grossfeld (new), Chi., head 
Wank & Wank, S. F-, acct exec 
McCann-Erickson, H'wood., radio business mgr 
Same, vp 

Toronto, radio dir 

A., acct exec 



Alford R. Poyntz, 
Mogge-Privett, L. 
Same, acct exec 
Grant, N. Y., vp. 



acct exec 
Julian Gross, Hartford Conn., vp in chge radio, TV 
Campbcll-Mithun, Chi., media dir 
Same, vp in chge radio, TV 
Raymond R. Morgan, H'wood., acct exec 
William II. Weintraub. N. Y., TV dir 
Same, chairman of board 
Same, dir 

Botsford, Constantine & Gardner, Portland Ore., acct exec 
\nung & Rubicam. Chi., acct exec 
Same, TV head 

Lunke-Maudsley (new), Seattle, partner 
Frederick E. Baker, Seattle Wash., acct exec, radio dir 
Geyer, Newell & Ganger, Detroit, acct exec 
Loise Mark (new), Milw.. head 
Lunke-Maudsley (new), Seattle, partner 
Pedler & Ryan, N. Y., chief timebuyer 
Same, mgr of video pgm div 
dir Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell & Bayles, N. Y., superv, coordi- 
nator radio, TV copy- 
Rutland, Gilchrist & Clem, Toronto, acct exec 
Melamed-Hohhs, Mnpls., acct exec 
Same, media dir 

Perry-Scott (new), L. A., co-head 
Same, partner 
Same, mgr 

Adolphe Wenland, H'wood.. acct exec 
Cox, Columbia S. ("., radio dept head 
Same, dir 

Alfred Paul Berger, N. Y., acct exec 
Peter Hilton, N. Y-, vp, acct exec 
Pcrrv-Scott (new), L. A., co-head 
Walker & Downing. Pitlsb., TV dir 
Henry A. Loudon. Boston, media dir 
Doherty, Clifford & Shenfield, N. Y., acct exec 
Same, vp 

.1. M. Mathes. N. Y.. radio, TV dir 
Adolphe Wenland, H'wood., acct exei 
Shulran Mahlin, Detroit, arc! exec 




Station Representation Changes 



STATION 



III hi . Bogota ( olumbia 
lllhli. Bogota Columbia 
III lx I ■', Bogota ( 'olumbia 

k i I \. Sail Lake City 

hi A. Oakland Calif. 

robacco Network, Raleigh N. i 
w I \ 1 . Royal Oak Mich. 

\\ I \ I FM, l(">al Oak Ml. I. 

w ill N, Syrai use N. Y. (TV) 
w lllo TV, Dayton O. 
VVMGM, n. y, 

w n in i \ . New Haven < onn. 
WOOD, Grand Rapids Mich, 
w CI /. Phila. (TV) 



AFFILIATION 



Independent 

Endependenl 

Independent 

ABC 

Independent 

Independent 
Independent 
CHS. ABC, 
(BS 

Independent 
DuMont 
Independent 
NIK TV 



DuMont 



NEW NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



Melrhor (iu/man, I". S. & Canada only 

Melchor Guzman, C. s. ,x Canada only 

M.lili.ir (ill/man. I . S. .x Canada only 

George P. Hollingbery 

Bin n Smith 

Forjoe 

I'riedenherg 

Friedenberg 

Kati 

Kal/ 

Radio Representatives, except N. Y. 

Kat/ 

Katz 

NIK Spot Sales 







titti 

5 PRODUCERS 

wwwwwt 



♦m 

4 SCRIPT WRITERS 



WW 

5 MUSIC ARRANGERS 



11 NEWS 

DEPT. 

MEN 



WW 



4 FARM SERVICE 
DEPT. MEN 



MH H WHfflHHHW WWWWWWWWt 



42 PROFESSIONAL RADIO PERFORMERS 



WHO is of course proud of its net- 
work (NBC) live programming, which 
gives our audience up-to-the-minute, 
world-wide coverage of special events, 
as well as the talent of outstanding en- 
tertainers, etc. 

Local live programming, however, is 
equally important. Local live program- 
ming gives our station individuality in 
its program material, individuality in its 
performers, and a greater opportunity 
for community and regional Puhlic 
Service. 

The illustration above shows some 
interesting statistics on our Program- 
ming Department. The results of all 
this manpower and all these carefully- 
planned locally- produced programs, 
however, are far more spectacular than 
the mere figures: 



FIRST, many of WHO's locally- 
produced shows get higher Hoop- 
ers than competitive network 
features; 

SECOND, 42.4% of all the daytime 
radio families and 61.0% °f «" 
the nighttime radio families in 
Iowa "listen most'''' to Jf HO, accord- 
ing to the 1948 Iowa Radio Audi- 
ence Survey. 

Write for the complete Survey — or 
ask Free & Peters, Inc. 

WHO 

+/©r Iowa PLUS + 

Des Moines • . . 50,000 Watts 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 

P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 




FREE & PETERS, INC. 
National Representatives 



31 JANUARY 1949 




Giant in a hurry.. 




A pair of tap-dancers run through 

their capers . . . leaning over his sc7~ipt, 
a news analyst commits it to memory . . . 
the great mike-boom reaches out, 
fishing for the voice of the singer 
in the bright pool of light 

before the cameras . . . 
and marching across the foreground 
with superb unconcern, 
a workman pushes a wheelbarrow 
loaded with plaster. 



H 



ERE is a portrait of a giant in a hurry . . . 
backstage in the production of a miracle, 
spinning magic for millions where only yester- 
day were thousands. 

Here are the new CBS Television studios, 
fountainhead of the television shows which 
reach larger audiences more often than any 
others in television today. 

Here is the nerve -center of the expanding 
CBS Television network . . . one station a year ago ... 29 stations today. . . constantly 
reaching out to more people, more markets. And through such reaching, driving ever 
downward the costs of delivering audiences. (Today in New York City a full-dress, 
full-hour CBS-TV program delivers more people per dollar than the average full-page, 
standard-size newspaper ad. ) 

Here, the shape of tomorrow's economy is being wired for light and sound. 
Here is CBS Television. Here is where you belong. 



CBS-TELEVISION 



— now operating in 29 markets 



for profitable 
setting - 

INVESTIGATE 



WDEL 



WILMINGTON 

DEL. 



WGAL 



LANCASTER 

PENNA. 



WKBO 



HARRISBURG 

PENNA. A 



WORK 



YORK 

PENNA. 



WRAW 



READING 

PENNA. 



WEST 



EASTON 

PENNA. 



Represented by 

^wjg MEEKER 

ASSOCIATES 

New York • Chicago 

Son Francisco • Los Angeles 



Clair R. McCollough 
Managing Director 

STEINMAN STATIONS 





Donald Dan fori li 

President 
Ralston Purina Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

To most city dwellers, the name "Ralston" means hot and cold 
cereals and Ry-Krisp, as well as their offspring's delight in the daily 
air adventures of Tom Mix. To ruralites, the firm name means 
rheckerhoard-front stores and checkerhoard-print hags of feed, as 
well as the weekly 15-minute Checkerboard Jamboree. The man 
whose job it has been since 1932 to head up this corporate split 
personality is 50-year old Donald Danforth. son of the peppery, 
moralistic founder of Ralston Purina. William II. Danforth. From 
his simple office, amidst an aura of carefully-cultivated folksiness, 
Danforth runs the $2 10. 000.000 Ralston business with a firm execu- 
tive hand. His aging father is a benevolent figurehead these days, 
keeping his hand in the business, but more often calling on farmers 
to talk cattle feed and hand out checkered ties. Donald Danforth's 
shrewd persistence and administrative abilities have done much 
toward increasing the business ten-fold since he assumed the presi- 
denc) (after a 12-year apprenticeship) of Ralston Purina. 

Although the Ralston hot and cold cereal business amounts to 
only 5% ($12,000,000) of the total Ralston business, nearly $1,750,- 
000 of a $3,500,000 ad budget (50^ ) goes to sell cereals. Radio 
is by far the biggest Ralston ad medium, and has been the main- 
stay of Ralston advertising ever since Ralston traced a 35'r sales 
increase in the years 1932-37 to their use of Tom Mix. now on MRS. 
Radio literally lifted the cereal department from a liability in the 
1920's to a real asset in the depression-ridden 1930s. 

The cowIion thriller is a well-promoted operation, with frequent 
I'M niium campaigns for the moppets and Ralston campaigns aimed 
at dealers and salesmen, most of them watched over by Danforth 
to see that they conform in ever) «;u to RalstOll's promotion 
themes of "service and simplicitv. ' The same promotion rules hold 
true for Ralston's other MRS show. Checkerboard Jamboree, which 
dispenses folk music and farm humor to its highly rural audience, 
whose buying of Ralstoifs "dhows'" (Dan forth -esc for "feed I and 
other farm products has placed Ralston in a top place in the 
country's $2,500,000,000 feed industry. Danforth's biggest problem 
is with the St. Louis Post Office, which unfeelingly insists that Ral- 
ston Purina's address is not "Checkerboard Square. 



14 



SPONSOR 



i. 

r 




WHAT 
WILL SHE 
SAY? 



/ HE PHONE rings. . . . it's a radio 
survey . . . what will "Madam House- 
wife's" answer be? Every Time Buyer, 
Station Manager and Advertiser 
wants to know. In the North Dakota 
Market two out of three listeners say 

31 JANUARY 1949 



KSJB .... and they say it consist- 
ently, morning, noon and night. There 
are two reasons why KSJB ranks high. 
First of all listeners can hear KSJB 
and secondly they like what they hear. 

KSJB's management is consistently on 
the alert to keep their local program- 
ming in tune with listeners' likes. And 
of course, like listeners all over 
America, more and more North Da- 
kota families are gettng "The Colum- 
bia Habit" every day. 

Now is the time to take advantage of 
KSBJ's wide audience too. Weather 
being what it is in North Dakota, 
families stay home with their radios 
these days. New opinions are formed, 
old buying ideas changed. It's your 
grand opportunity to tell North Da- 
kotans why your product is best . . . 
and tell them often. And no other 
medium can do the job as well, or as 
inexpensively, as KSJB, Columbia's 
outlet for North Dakota. 



There are still some availabilities on 
(KSJB) North Dakota's favorite source 
of news, drama and amusement. Your 
Geo. Hollingbery representative has 
these availabilities listed and can get 
you on the air and in the market in 
record time. Call Hollingbery today 
or write direct to KSJB at either 
Jamestown or Fargo. 



SURVEY RESULTS 








After- 






Morninc 


noon 


Evening 


KSJB 


54.4 


46.5 


49.6 


Station A 


18.0 


21.4 


23.5 


Station B 


19.3 


25.5 


17.7 


All Others 


8.3 


6.6 


9.2 


Survey tak 


en in Stutsman, B 


arnes, 


Griggs, Fos 


ter, Kidder, Logan and 


LaMour Counties, 


North Dakota. 



KSJB, 5,000 Watts unlimited at 600 
KC, the Columbia Station for North 
Dakota with studios in Fargo and 
Jamestown. 



15 




Stroll thru 

Rhode Island 

some afternoon! 



Believe it or not, a brisk eight-mile 
"constitutional" will take you smack- 
dab thru FOUR BIG CITIES! And 
it'^ here, in tins small but golden 
circle, that approximately two-thirds 
of Rhode Island's buying power is 
concentrated. WFCI blankets this 
rich area and scores of communities 
beyond ... at rates unmatched for 
thrift by any other Rhode Island net- 
work station . . . releasing advertising 
dollars for duty where the going is 
tough! 



THE LOW-COST, HIGH-RESULT 

NETWORK STATION IN 

RHODE ISLAND 

IS 




IVew <I<-vHo|mih-iiI* on SPOXSOIl stories 



5000 WATTS 
DAY & NIGHT 



WALLACE A. WALKER, Gen. Mgr. 

PROVIDENCE, The Shcroton-Biltmore 

PAWTUCKET, 450 Main St. 



Representatives: 

AVERY-KNODIL, INC. 



| IS. 



See: "Network Programs For Local Sponsors" 
Issue: July 1948, p 68 

CBS Co-op Department reduced to "in case" 
status. MBS and ABC co-op sales up over 1947; 
NBC sales down 



Departure last Summer of Ralph Hatcher, head of the CBS co- 
operative program department, and his promotion expert, Nancy 
Cook, wasn't because they weren't doing a job. The fact is that top 
int work strategists thought they foresaw approach of that happy 
point (long enjoyed by NBC) where too little commercial time 
would be available for co-op shows. 

Right now, CBS has only four network programs available for 
local sponsorship (during 1948 there were eight) : World News 
Roundup; News of America: The World Tonight; It Pays To Be 
Ignorant. Ignorant wont be available as a co-op when its current 
c\cle ends- 27 February. However. Gangbusters will be made avail- 
able as a co-op to those stations that Ceneral Foods doesn't buy 
for the chain airing. 

Any sponsor of a co-op in network time is ultimately at the mercy 
of the network sales department (although this is less true of ABC 
and MBS. who have a great deal more open timet. Last Fall, when 
NBC slotted Morton Downe\ at 11:15 p.m. on Tuesdav. Thursday, 
and Saturda\ nights, stations carrying Richard Harkness i \1T\\TFi 
had to cancel out local sponsors who had Harkness on Tuesdays and 
Thursdays. Glueck Brewing Co. (Minneapolis) wanted Harkness 
five nights a week or not at all: so they canceled him on KSTP 
and seven other stations in their territory. 

It's a different storv on ABC and MBS. ABC recent!) reported a 
10', gain in local advertisers over L947 (719 to 852 in 1948). 
Vlutuals gain over 1947 in co-op program sales was 12' <. repre- 
sented h\ 1316 station-program sales, or more than 1900 individual 
sponsors. This, according to MRS. tops the othei networks com- 
bined. 



PSee: Farm Series 
• !^« Issue: October 1948, page 27; 

November 1948, page 42 

Where and how to get list of major farm service 
programs. 

Where to look for a list of major farm service programs on the air 
today is no longer a problem. The National Association of Radio 
Farm Directors has just published its 1948 Yearbook and Directory 
with a list of 263 farm programs on 93 commercial stations. It can 
be had at $2 per copy from RFI) v. p. Wallace Kadderly. KGW, Port- 
land, Ore. 

For the convenience of agenc) and sponsor publicity and public 
relations people, the programs are arranged under an alphabetical 
listing of the stations which air them. Time of broadcast, whether 
sold as a unit or on participating basis, whether sponsored or sus- 
taining are indicated, along with name of the farm director. Other 
chapters give I v pes of contest- sponsored during 1948 for larm 
listeners: data on soil conservation projects; honors and awards 
won bv various programs; television outlook for farm programs. 

The NARFD is an informal organization which prepares and 
broadcasts programs especially designed for rural listeners. The 2(>3 
programs listed in the \ VRFD Yearbook do not include everv farm- 
in teresl program on the air, because not everv one who airs a faun 
program is a member of the Association. With few exceptions, how- 
ever, the NARFD rostei includes everv broadcastei whose principal 
interest is farm radio and related activities. 



16 



SPONSOR 



it's easy. 



IF YOU 
KNOW HOW! 



I 




n some parts of the nation, a radio station can do almost 
anything- can broadcast in Chinese or Italian- and still be 
"right" for a lot of people. 

It's different in the South. Accurate Know-How is espe- 
cially important in KWKH's four-state area. Our listeners 
have definite and fairly uniform preferences. They want 
their programs to recognize their preferences. KWKH 
gives them this sort of programming, learned from 23 years 
of continuous study. Our audience responds by listening to 
KWKH, and by buying the products we advertise. 

We'd be happy to tell you all about KWKH's outstand- 
ing rating, and how you can use our Know-How. Ask us — 
or The Branham Company! 



KWKH 



50,000 Watts 



31 JANUARY 1949 



CBS 





Texas ) 


SHREVEPORT i 


LOUISIANA 


The Branham Company 
Representatives 


Arkansas 
Mississippi 



1 [enry Clay. General Manager 



17 






NUMBER ONE STATE 

AND NORTH CAROLINA'S 



NUMBER 1 SALESMAN IS..: 



50,000 WATTS 680 KC 
NBC AFFILIATE 




RALEIGH, N. C. 

FREE & PETERS, INC. 

NATIONAL MPRtSlNTAllVl 






programs 

4HHW|1 It's a little like finding a 
^■■■■■■■b clear-cut reason for the 
1929 stock market crash. In nine 
cases out of ten, the "reason" for the 
dozen or so major program substitu- 
tions by leading advertisers in any 
broadcasting season is the outward 
result of an inner conflict of forces, 
one of which is stronger than the 
others. In plain English, sponsors 
change programs for reasons varying 
from an irate wife demanding a show 
with enough prestige to help her in the 
Social Register to an embittered sales 
manager wanting a show that will help 
him at the cash register. 

In radio's early days, when pro- 
graming was usually an unresearched, 
hit-or-miss thing, sponsors changed 
programs frequently in an attempt to 
Sales departments effect program changes. Joe Tiers, Procter Electric assistant sales man- Come Up with a show that would sell 
ager (right), hears new show played by Newell-Emmett executive Dick Strobridge the product, as well as attract a size- 



31 JANUARY 1949 



19 



Program rliangrs produce rliain read ions 





Jack Benny, and Rochester, parted company 
with General Foods over money and publicity 



able audience. Programs frequentlj 
changed when a new type or a new 
approach began to pull results for an 
advertiser. The outstanding example 
of such follow-the-leader program 
changing was the mass migration to 
children's programs by cereal com- 
panies in the early 1930's (sponsor, 
3 January 1949). 

As advertisers begin to realize the 
possibilities (and the limitations) of 
broadcast advertising, program 
changes except for the normal sum- 
mer replacement routine — grow fewer 
and further apart. There are still ad- 
vertisers in radio and TV who rush 
in every season with a program that 
hasn't jelled, only to have it fall on its 



change #1 



Some of the money spent formerly for Jack 
Benny was invested in "The Aldrich Family" 



change #2 



M e re ( 
paid 



face. The advertiser then either 
swears off radio for years or tries an- 
other program quickly. A dozen 
(more or less) advertisers every sea- 
son throw in the towel somewhere 
between September and June and, 
rather than quit radio altogether, get 
another program either in the same 
time slot on the same network or 
somewhere else. 

The closest thing to the "lowest com- 
mon denominator" of these program 
changes is program rating. A high 
rating excuses many things. In most 
cases, a high rating builds a healthy 
sales picture. Even if the show is ob- 
viously not suited to the advertiser or 
the product, if research shows a high 



listening factor, the opposition to the 
program, whether it be the agency, or 
the sponsor's organization, or the 
hoard of directors, etc., has little 
chance to get in a word. But when 
ratings start a downward spiral on a 
show that has lasted through several 
seasons, or if they fail to build for a 
new show, the storm signals are up for 
a program change. 

It is when ratings slip that the im- 
portant stockholder rises in righteous 
indignation at a director's meeting and 
shouts: "See? What did I tell you?" 
It is the time when the agency begins 
to drop strong hints (providing they 
never wanted the program in the first 
place, or if they inherited the show in 



Thirteen Reasons* Why Sponsors Change Programs 




Total equals 100*/. 






HI 



Low ratings Pressure from Problems To shift Change in Change in To break away Prestige Chonging Rising To reach new Change of Management's 

soles force with stars to current advertising advertising from current competitive program audiences networks personal 

program trend objective budget program trend picture costs reasons 

• Reasons (or program ihifu used in this chorl were selected on the basis of being primary reasons for the change. 





change #3 



"mr. ace and JANE" carried some of the Gen- 
eral Foods burden later until killed by Hoopers 




n's program also was 
ormer Jack Benny coin 



Plirront ^Y Favorite Husband" started 
uUI I Gill where "ace and JANE" dropped 



an agency switch I to the sponsor that 
his program vehicle needs revamping. 
Down-spiralling ratings may even be 
the cue for network or station execu- 
tives to apply pressure on both agency 
and sponsor to make a change, often as 
part of a new block of programs de- 
signed to meet a changing competitive 
picture. 

Even high ratings don't free spon- 
sors from the problem of facing a 
program change. While they may 
pacify one set of people, high ratings 
have caused more than one show to 
topple, particularly when the show is 
built around a central star, rather than 
a central idea. The average radio star 
feels that a top rating entitles him or 
her to two things: more freedom and 
more money. General Foods has 
changed programs at least twice for 
this reason. After nearly 15 years of 
sponsoring Kate Smith, her daytime 
rating in 1946 was high on the list 
for her type of show. Everything was 
going fine for General Foods until 
Kate began to plug for a higher talent 
fee. While General Foods executives 
were carefully figuring the proposed 
increases against her proven sales re- 
sults. Kate, feeling secure in her posi- 
tion after IS years, began to make 
cracks on the air about independent 
grocers, and how much better (and 
safer) it was to buy at chain stores. 
It drew fire immediately from inde- 
pendent grocers, particularly from the 
Michigan Retail Grocers Association 
who let General Foods know in no 
uncertain terms what they thought of 
Kate Smith. 

31 JANUARY 1949 



That did it. Miss Smith was dropped, 
and Wendy Warren went into the time 
period on CBS. 

Jack Benny was another star whose 
program was dropped by General 
Foods (Jello) because of dollar prob- 
lems. The Waukegan star, in early 
1945, began to complain to General 
Foods that not enough money was 
being spent by the sponsor to promote 
the show, and that more money should 
likewise be forthcoming for the pro- 
gram. Relations became strained be- 
tween Benny and his sponsor. Gen- 
eral Foods liked Benny. He was a 
prestige builder with both the public 
and the sales force, as well as a great 
salesman for Jello. But again, when 
General Foods applied the yardstick 
of increased cost-vs-results. the Benny 
show was dropped. To replace it. 
General Foods spent money hitherto 
earmarked for Benny in an eventual 
total of three shows: Aldrich Family 
(a former Benny summer replace- 
ment), Meredith Willson Show (the 
outgrowth of another G-F show for 
Maxwell House Coffee), and for mr. 
ace and JANE (a new package when 
G-F bought it.) Goodie Ace's show 
in turn was dropped at the end of 
1948, principally because the rating 
was slow in building and the Ace 
brand of humor was a shade too 
sophisticated for G-F dealers and 
salesmen. Into its slot went a CBS- 
built package, My Favorite Husband. 
which was more to G-F's liking. No 
one of the shows pulls anything like 
the Benny rating, but the total audi- 
ence of the three, purchased for rough- 



ly the cost of the Benny show, de- 
livered more quantitatively than Benn) 
produced for Jello. Willson hasn't as 
yet made the grade for any sponsor. 
The show that changes because of 
trouble with the star is not uncommon. 
The classic example is the old Al Job 
son Show for Lever Brothers in the 
late 1930's. Jolson used to kid the 
sponsor's product during the show's 
warm-up. It was all in fun but one 
day the client happened to arrive at the 
show earlier than usual and caught the 
act. This was in the days before spon- 
sors learned that a little informalit) 
with regard to the "dignity" of their 
product could be helpful at times. The 
sponsor listened, and Jolson was called 
on the carpet. When the dust settled. 
Jolson's show was dropped. A few 
years ago too, Bayuk Cigars was spon- 
soring a 15-minute show with Cal 
Tinney. a Will Rogers-like hillbilly 
philosopher. Tinney, one day, began 
to sound off on a variety of topics that 
were near and dear to the sponsor's 
heart. Cal Tinney went out, and in 
went a much "safer" show. Inside Of 
Sports. More recently. Miles Labora- 
tories changed from Lum and Aimer 
on CBS to a new comedy package. 
Herb Shriner. The reason was parti) 
due to bickering between Miles ami 
the show's stars, partly to a feeling 
on Miles' part that the show had run 
out of ideas. This was helped along 
by the difficulties in clearing time on 
many CBS network stations for the 
show, which fell in a marginal time 
period. This, in turn, created some 
(Please turn to pagt 




Radio announcements warned Los Angeles that it was dangerous to visit Ohrbach's on opening day due to the hordes that waited to see the new store 

IHiriiiii'li's invades Los Angeles 



i .mi a lo<*al radio 



<*ani|»aigii ln k planned 




ail«l |M*«'|Kir<*«l 



:t.OOO miles away? 



"Do not try to get into 
Ohrbach' s today. Th ere 
is a tremendous throng jam- 
ming every floor, every inch of 
space ..." 

So ran the air copy heard by lis- 
teners in metropolitan Los Angeles 
last 3 December. For the seven- 
hour period that this unorthodox, ne- 
gative air-selling continued to be heard 
during women's participation pro- 
grams and station break periods, it 
merely increased the curiosity of 
thousands of women in the City of 
the Angels. What, they wanted to 
know, was happening down on the 
"Miracle Mile'' block of Wilshire 
Boulevard anyway? 



The police department, forced to 
call out reinforcements, had one an- 
swer — a real traffic jam. Neighbor- 
ing merchants, like swank Bullocks 
and the high-pressure May Co.. had 
another — Ohrbach's had made a 
beachhead in their bailiwick. For the 
heads of Ohrbach's and Grey Adver- 
tising Agency, it was the end of a 
long merchandising road that led from 
Manhattan's brash. bustling 14th 
Street to the high-fashion gloss of 
world-famed Wilshire. 

National selective radio. Ohrbach's 
now knew, could do more than move 
goods off a shelf. It had more than 
done its share in establishing Ohr- 
bach's both in the store's home territon 



22 



SPONSOR 



of New York and in Los Angeles, as 
something other than a glorified bar- 
gain basement. Without ever mention- 
ing prices, it convinced increasing 
numbers of women that Ohrbach's 
was selling Fifth-Avenue fashions at 
low cost. It had added the required 
touch of sophistication and flair to 
Ohrbach's advertising that was needed 
to bring in the middle and upper- 
middle class customers. Above all. 
it was a flexible, versatile selling tool 
that meshed smoothly with Ohrbach's 
space and billboard advertising. 

Ohrbach's operated for a quarter- 
century before beginning to use radio. 
The store had its start in 1923 on 
Union Square, right across the street 
from S. Klein, the basement of bar- 
gain basements. Nathan Ohrbach, 
who founded the business, startled his 
fellow-merchants on 14th Street with 
his merchandising policies. He sold 
at the same prices they did. Even 
today. Ohrbach's operates profitably 
on a gross margin that averages 17% 
(the U.S. Dept. of Commerce lists 
26.2% as "unprofitable," and 30.5 



as average 
wear shops), 
to do some 
business with 
500,000. 

During the 



/o 
for women's ready-to- 
and managed in 1948 
$40,000,000 worth of 
a net income of $1,- 

early days of Ohr- 
bach's, the store's advertising was 
aimed at the same readers of mass- 
media New York newspapers who 
shopped price-slashing competitors 
like S. Klein's and Loehmann's. But 
unlike other women's stores who de- 
pend on low-unit profits and a high- 
volume trade, Ohrbach's went in for 
the slick art-work in their ads that 
uptown establishments like Saks and 
Lord & Taylor featured. First it was 
cartoons by Melisse and Peter Arno, 
later (during the war) it was abstract 
sketches of New York, and still later 
it was Vogue-like fashion art. 

Never did the advertising mention 
prices directly. This was part of 
Nat Ohrbach's store policy that went 
with no charge accounts, no deliveries, 
no seasonal sales, no frills, and strictly 
cash sales. 

In September of 1947, Ohrbach's 
began to look around for something 
to hypo their advertising. Selling was 
again becoming highly competitive 
for the 14th Street Ohrbach store, and 
for its branch in Newark, New Jersey. 
Nat Ohrbach and son Jerrv Ohrbach 
eyed radio with a wary eye. Broad- 
casting, for the most part, eyed Ohr- 
(Please turn to page 50) 



- 



h 






Tex McCrary and Jinx Falkenburg flew from New York for seven days of Ohrbach's guest appearances 




Ohrbach's was news, so KMPC broadcast an interview with N. M. Ohrbach by Jinx Fallcenburg 




Joe Yocam of KFWB asked Ohrbach's first-day shoppers how they liked the store as debut nears close 



31 JANUARY 1949 



23 



what's available and where 



Tf Research 



Effect of TV on Living Habits 



Goes to movies 
Goes to ball games 
Goes to wrestling matches 
Goes to horse races 
Reads at home 
Entertains adult guests 
Entertains children guests 



Less More 

Frequently The Same Frequently 



130 11 

242 . H8 

251 ■ 



277 



210 



|10 



V 



12| 71 



161 107 



Sample was 331 Chicago families, half of whom hod sets before April 1948 ond half of whom 

purchased sets afler that date. 
Survey made under direction of Dr. George R. Terry of Northwestern University (August 1948) 



How Long Do Commercials Seem? 



estimated minutes of advertising per Vi hour 



TELEVISION 
RADIO 



upper class 
upper middle 
middle class 

total group 
minutes 



2.26 



3.39 



2.44 



2.41 



2.41 



3.87 



4.54 



' - ' ' ' WB. :\ " - : 



3.98 



12 3 4 

-i 1 1 1 1 i i i t- 



■4D 



Survey made by Thomas E. Coffin of Hofslro College, Hempstead, L. I. (July 19481 



Use of the visual air will 
have to be learned in a 
much shorter period of 
time than it took to learn how to use 
radio. Delays in TV are too expen- 
sive. The cost of muddling through 
is great. TV time and program pro- 
duction costs are too heavy to provide 
a leisurely period of trial and error. 

Television is growing rapidly, and 
the multiple problems involved in 
using the new medium must be met 
and solved. To make the job easier, 
a growing number of television re- 
search organizations (22 at this 
writing) are already operating on a 
continuing basis. Research is the one 
tool at hand for telescoping the period 
of time necessary to attain mature pro- 
graming and advertising effectiveness. 

Of equal importance with the fact 
that a body of television research or- 
ganizations exists to help in the use 
of television is the matter of view- 
point toward this research. The find- 
ings of today are not necessarily the 
facts of tomorrow. If yesterdays 
sponsors had accepted the conclusions 
of early radio research, organ recitals 
would have top billing today, while 
comedy shows would hardly find a 
place on station or network schedules. 

Today, the emphasis is on quantita- 
tive data. How mam sets are there 
in the market? How many viewers 
are there per set? What percentage 
of the sets-in-use does this program 
have? How much docs it cost per 
thousand \iewers? What percentage 
of viewers remembers TV commer- 
cials? How many people plan to buy 
television sets within six months or a 
year in specific markets? Sponsors 
and prospective sponsors of TV pro- 
grams want all the figures the\ can 
find to help them estimate the effec- 
tiveness of the medium. The) are justi- 
fied in wanting these figures now. 

Less pressing in need is that aspect 
of research which has long range im- 



24 



SPONSOR 



plications -the qualitative side of re- 
search, though "the-day-after-tomor- 
row" (almost literally I is the full 
range of projectahility for most of the 
qualitative findings of today. Foremost 
among the questions to be answered 
by qualitative research is: How effec- 
tive is the qualit) of reception on the 
different channels in this area? Good 
reception is of prime importance; put- 
ting first things first, the program 
must be seen. After this the ques- 
tions multiply. How effective are the 
commercials? What are the char- 
acteristics of the audience? What 
types of programs do television viewers 
like best? How well does television 
wear with average set owners? How 
good is the talent? Will program pre- 
testing help to put on a more effective 
show? These and a score of other 
questions must be answered for the 
sponsor and the television industry if 
the medium is to take shape so that 
all its potentialities as an entertain- 
ment and educational medium are de- 
veloped (granting that it will develop 
into a unique art form with its own 
laws, as distinct from those of radio 
and motion pictures). 

Of the 22 television research or- 
ganizations operating on a continuing 
basis, six compile information on 



number of sets. Baltimore Television 
Circulation Committee. Television 
Forecast, Inc. (for WKBB, Chicago), 
and Washington Research Committee 
limit their activity to estimating num- 
ber of sets in their areas. The Radio 
Manufacturers' Association gives 
monthly figures on total number of 
TV sets manufactured in the United 
States. Quarterly, the figures are ad- 
justed by distribution areas, but since 
only 90% of the sets manufactured 
are produced by RMA members, the 
figure is not definitive. 

Hooper estimates the number of 
sets in the nine metropolitan areas 
through his radio coincidental tele- 
phone survey. All the homes checked 
are asked, in addition to the Hooper 
radio program questions, "do you own 
a TV set?" The percentage of owners 
saying "yes" is projected to the homes 
in the area as defined by the U.S. 
Census Bureau. 

NBC, which, like Hooper, does more 
research-wise than estimating number 
of sets, uses figures from RMA and 
other manufacturers to determine the 
number of sets in the areas covered 
by the network. Cross checks are 
made by the network over the same 
areas to determine the accuracy of its 
estimates. 



Hooper, Pulse, and Radox i>iiid- 
linger. Philadelphia) rate I \ pro- 
grams and estimate the sets-in-usc in 
the areas in which they operate. 
Hooper is currently rating TV eve- 
ning programs from 6 to 11:00 p.m., 
every half hour, by days of the week. 
This TV Hooperating will be reported 
six times a year in New York, and 
three times yearly in Philadelphia, 
Baltimore, Washington, Cleveland, 
Detroit, Chicago, St. Louis, and Los 
Angeles (in these latter cities as TV 
set ownership epands and creates de- 
mand by the trade for the service). 
In these ratings, television will be com- 
pared with radio, using total radio 
homes as a base. Hoopers "Tele- 
ratings," based only on TV homes, 
report coincidentally on programs in 
nine city areas. Diary-based Tele- 
ratings in ten other cities are made 
periodically on order. 

Pulse, which rates programs 
throughout the television day, uses the 
roster-recall method in a door-to-door 
polling technique in New York, Phila- 
delphia, and Chicago. Pulse uses TV 
homes as a base for its TV-rating. 
Radox, which surveys programing 
from 9 a.m. to midnight, listens in on 
homes in Philadelphia via telephone 
(Please turn to page 49) 



llirectory of TV Research Services 


ORGANIZATION 


mcnDMATinw rr>k>Pii en NUMBER SETS PROGRAM QUALI- CDC ,~ IAI TV TESTf STATION 
INFORMATION COMPILED: QF SETS |N USE RAT|N( _ v^^ SPECIAL TOWNS T COVERAGE 


Audience Research, Inc. 








\ 


\ 






Baltimore Television Circulation Committee 


V 














Broadcast Measurement Bureau, Inc. 


V 












V 


CBS 








V 




V 




Hofstra College 








V 








Hooper 


V 


V 


V 




\ 






James E. Jump & Associates 








V 


\ 






Jay & Graham Research Organization 








V 


V 






McCann-Erickson 








V 








NBC 


V 






V 


V 






Neilsen 




V* 


V* 




V* 






Newell-Emmett 








V 


V 


V 




Northwestern University 








V 








Pulse 




V 


V 




V 






Radox and Teldox 




V 


V 


V 


V 






Radio Manufacturers Association 


V 














Rutgers University 








V 




V 




Schwerin Research Corporation 








V 


V 




Television Forecast, Inc. 


V 












Television Research Institute 










V 


Washington Research Committee 


V 










Younq & Rubicam 








\ 





'Neilsen TV service in New York area begins I May 1949. 



fSpecific towns selected for intensive research. 



31 JANUARY 1949 



25 




In paneled setting such as this, George Gallup made reports on the public's reactions to important trends of the da^ 

ItniiidciiNling and the broker 

Morrill l/vnrli. I*i«»r«««». I Viiih'i- & IBr-siiH* niin-w «'«»k ii*si |ir»vos 
ih. to securities can Im' >ohl on ilio air 



1LPFB 



I Selling invest inoiit coun- 
» selling usually leaves the 
seller feeling like Columbus, after he 
tried to convince 15th century scien- 
tists the world was round. Nine out of 
ten \merieans still don't know the dif- 
ference between a stock and a bond, 
according to most Wall Street brokers. 
Those same Americans look upon the 
investment counsellor as a cross be- 
tween a crystal-gazer and the Daily 
Racing Form, or else as a smooth- 
talking front man for Brooklyn Bridge 
Preferred. 

In terms of advertising, this means 
that the investment counsellor must 
ln-t break down a wall of ignorance 
and misinformation before he can 
even begin to sell. He has to do what 
amounts to an educational job explain- 
ing basic principles of buying and 
selling seem ilie>. I'eople w ho are un- 



26 



familiar with securities aren't likely to 
invest in them. 

This in its essence is the problem 
that prompted the Wall Street broker- 
age firm of Merrill Lynch, Pierce, 
Fenner & Beane to seek part of the 
answer in television during the Fall 
of 1948. The big firm, known far and 
w nil- as " I he I huridei in- I lei d ol 
\\ all Street" because of its non-stop 
name and its still-longer list of !!(> 
partners, had used broadcast advertis- 
ing a few times in the past. They spon- 
sored a nightlv 5-minute business news 
roundup on WOK. \A .. from I'M.") 
to 1947. In January of 1947, they had 
expsrimented with TV, sponsoring the 
showing on WCBS-TV, N.Y., of a 20- 
minute film about the New ^ ork Stock 



Exchange with comments by MLFB's 
president, practical Yankee-born Win- 
throp H. Smith. 

There had been other attempts at 
selling investment counselling in the 
past, but from none of them could 
MLPFB draw encouragement or posi- 
tive guidance. In the period between 
1928 and 1932. several major financial 
services or investment trusts Babson 
Statistical. Investor's Syndicate, Dis- 
tributor's Group, and Halsey. Stuart — 
had sponsoi ed netwoi k prog] ams, ( hie 
of those programs. The Old Counsel- 
lor, had left a bad taste in the mouths 
of radio executives. The unctuous- 
voiced Old Counsellor was a straight 
stock-selling operation which, in the 
I /'lease turn to page I- I 



Wall Street's big problem is to sell the American public on what happens when stocks and 
bonds are sold. Most listeners and viewers don't know the difference between stocks and bonds 

SPONSOR 







» 


v ■. 




|5g 


kip 


1 


'jKl- 






'Sua 


HH 


B 


. V 


aSifi 


I 






: ' ■ f 


S&Sn 


^KSfi7> 



3M 



sB 



«V£ 



^ 



* 



*"V 



^ X 



ll« 







I'ommiTrials 



with a plus 



make them timely 



make them local 





How timely and how local- 
ized can a commercial be? 
As timely as the news that 
comes off the wire, and as localized 
as the city served by the radio station. 
Yet year after year the timely and 
local factor continues to be ignored in 
commercials. Few sponsors intrigue 
the listener at the time economic and 
emotional urges need satisfying. 

Timeliness and localization are not 
by any means mutually exclusive — oft- 
times one cannot be separated from 
the other. Ford achieved timeliness 
and, at the same time, localization by 
tying-in its commercials with Cali- 
fornia, early in January, tongue-in- 
cheeking: "Here in California, this 
week, we had a little sun and— six 
inches of snow . . ." Commercial 
went on to give weather news of Min- 
nesota (where it was snowing), Ar- 
kansas (raining), and Alabama (heat 
wave). Selling came into the copy 
when the commercial explained that 
Ford heaters were working in Minne- 
sota ■ — and California - - windshield 
wipers were working in Arkansas, and 
Ford convertibles had their tops down 
in Alabama. The previous week, the 
commercial tied in with California by 
noting that more cars are registered 
in that state than in any other. Pitch 
angled that the more cars there are 
on the road, the more Fords are seen. 
Localization is achieved in San 
Francisco by the Rexall Drug Chain 
via a jingle which brings in the city's 
famed cable cars, a means of trans- 
portation that can be duplicated only 
in Seattle. Washington. The Rexall 



cable car b°, 



i r u g 



ffect localiies 
commercial* 



store, Owl Drug Store, is locateJ at 
the terminus of the cable line. The 
jingle is sung to the tune of The Irish 
Washerwoman, and a cable car bell 
clangs in rhythm in the background as 
the lyric unfolds: 

Sure, the cable car's Ioadin' on Mason 

and Powell, 
Because of the bargains they're sellin' 

at Owl; 
From Market and Mission and Sacra- 

men-TO 
They're rushin' to Owl because they all 

know . . . 

(VOICE ON ECHO CHAMBER) 
You buy BETTER for LESS ... at 

OWL! 

Timeliness can be achieved by tying 
in the commercial with weather or the 
season of the year, an important event, 
or inventory needs. And even more 
fundamentally, with time itself. Time 
signal station-breaks are used by Bulo- 
va, Benrus. and Longines. American 
Chicle Company, at one time used a 
jingle which began by announcing the 
day of the week. But the most com- 
mon use of timeliness in commercials 
is weather or seasonal tie-ins. 

Localization is accomplished by ty- 
ing in the commercial with an event 
local in nature, with a local personal- 
ity, with a physical attribute of the 
locality, or with, from the sponsor's 
standpoint, distribution or inventory 
needs. 

Drug companies have for years 
timed the pushing of their products 
with the season of the year — generally 
the period of bad weather. Block Drug 
uses e.t.'s in 100 markets from October 
through March, the season in which 
most of their business is done. Their 
commercial for Minipoo, a dry sham- 
poo that uses no water, stresses the 
fact that hair need not be wet during 
cold weather. Scott's Emulsion uses 
a weather springboard for its com- 
mercial on station WBZ, Boston: 
"Weather, clear and cold tonight . . . 
and here's something you'll want to 
know — Scott's Emulsion builds re- 
sistance, etc., etc." 

Cough remedies (Rem, Rel, 'Smith 
Bros, cough drops) have long used 
seasonal tie-ins for their products, re- 
serving their heavy commercial pushes 
for periods of raw, cold weather. 

Clothing and shoe companies also 
use weather in pushing goods. A na- 
tional clothing firm supplies its sta- 
tions with several pieces of weather 
copy which are used at the discretion 
of local station announcers. When 
weather threatens rain or cold, com- 
mercials plug raincoats or overcoats. 
This clothing chain achieves localiza- 
tion in its commercials by tying in 
with Community Chest, Red Cross 
(Please turn to page 50) 




timolinOCC ' s acr| ieved by Esso through broadcasts direct from the Freedom Train in 
IIIIICIIIICOO each city where the train stops and America visits its historical documents 




hjrfhfJQIf i' n gl es enable sponsors to make every announcement as topical as the calendar. 
Ull UlUaJf Harry Goodman has the jingles on daily transcriptions for selective sponsorship 

'HflflrPQQPC ena ble sponsors to localize their appeals 100%. Most famous of all sign- 
uUUICOOCo post commercials is Barney's "Seventh Avenue and 17th Street" jingle 




PART NINE 



SERIES 



IKINiRill lltlllHilS' 




"Wo oan'i «lo a i>oimI job." I h«»v complain, "when our host 
I'll oris jirc sniped al l»y ;»»<'inv. ;u!\riii>< r. anil nolwork." 



over-ail 



"If sponsors and non-radio 
agency executives would 
leave us alone, everything would be 
okay." is the wa\ one independent 
ladio producer ami director sings his 
lament. "Don't misunderstand me, I 
love them all. I know they have to 
tell the men who produce their pro- 
grams what they want, hut they don't 
have to edit our scripts, cast our pro- 
grams, and tell us just how they want 
a certain character plaved. 

""If sponsors would stay in the manu- 
facturing and sales end of business 
and permit the radio creative talent 
the) buy to create without handcuffs, 
I venture to say that ratings, sponsor 
identification, and even sales effec- 
tiveness of broadcast advertising would 
increase. 1 know without sponsors I'd 
be in another business, but I wish 
the) (I permit me to do my job. I 
haven't a single program on the air 
which I'm permitted to handle exactl) 
in the way I'd like to do it." 

This producer is not an exception. 
Over 50% of the independent pro- 
ducers, as well as program directors 
at agencies, in sponsor's cross- 
section, indicate that advertisers spon- 
soring tlieir programs insist on telling 
the producers ami directors their bus- 
iness. 

One of the most recent cases of a 
sponsoi deciding to Income a show- 
business authorih was in connection 
with a television program. The adver- 
tiser, one of Xmerica's greal electrical 
appliance manufacturers, had a video 
show thai lasted one night (something 
of a record Foi the medium i . and had 
jusl bought a new program. On the 
first program, the advertise] picked the 
i ast. It w asn'l good. < >n the -en, ml. 



the advertiser was all set to pick the 
cast again, when the producer notified 
the agenc\ involved that he wanted to 
cancel the program, putting it this 
way, "I'll continue to produce the show 
as long as they stay out of the program 
business. I'll also agree not to manu- 
facture electrical appliances." 

There was a compromise. The pro- 
ducer now selects a panel bigger than 
he actually requires for the program, 
and the sponsor selects from the pro- 
ducer's panel the actual cast. It makes 
extra work for the producer, but at 
least he's not stuck with performers 
who aren't telegenic and who aren't 
performers. 

Producers lament that they have to 
go through this routine of giving in 
to sponsors on matters about which 
sponsors are. most of the time, ill- 
equipped to dictate. . . . and there's 
nothing they can do about it — except 
quit, and they like to eat. 

Producers are constantly being ac- 
cused of reaching the wrong audience 
for a sponsor, whim thev have never 
been informed of the audience thev 
were supposed to be addressing.. As 
expressed by one producer, "Our 
.illei-the-fact" big shots who know just 
whom a program is supposed l<> be 
selling ought to be wised up that pro- 
ducers and directors are perfectb 
aware that lhe\ are passing the buck. 
Vgenc \ executives don't know, before 
a program goes on the air. whom 
thev are supposed to be selling, and 
therefore thev don't tell the produce] 
of the program. When salcs-elTectiv e- 
ness figures fail to satisfv the -ales 
managers of the sponsors. the\ blame 
the producers, directors, writers, and 
even the cast of the show. \nv good 



producer-director can slant his pro- 
duction for specific listeners as long as 
he knows whom he's supposed to be 
reaching. It's obviously impossible for 
him to shoot in the dark, or at the 
great mass of listeners, and to make 
certain at the same time that he's 
reaching a pinpointed market. Yet 
we're expected to do just that, time 
and time again. We're not miracle 
men." 

'"We have the reputation.'" laments 
a production man at one of the top five 
Madison Avenue agencies, "of being 
profligate with clients' money. Most 
of the time, the big-salary performers 
are contracted in advance for us be- 
fore we are handed a program to watch 
over. The only client money we 
spend is for supporting players and 
writers, and usuallv so little is left 
for us to spend that we have to plead 
poverty with actors and musical artists 
all the time. It's again a case of the 
policv men passing spending respon- 
sibilities to the men who do the work. 
I'm waiting for the day when I'm given 
enough' mone\ to spend to, as I see it, 
put on a program adequately. We had 
budgeted $500 for a writer for a 
comedy spot in a daily show recently, 
and when it came time to spend those 
five centuries, I was told that I had to 
buy a writer for $150. Where the 
other $350 went 1 haven't the slight- 
est idea, and it's wiser for me not to 
have any idea- aboul the matter. 

Producers as a general rule don't 
exceed budgets. Thev are given certain 
sums to spend. It's not their respon- 
sibility if. after thev spend what they're 
given, the program cost more than 
budgeted. 

I heii- i- hardh a producer who 



30 



SPONSOR 



doesn't blow his top when the subject 
of continuity acceptance departments 
of networks is broached. Producers 
are convinced that all the nitwits in 
broadcasting are in the blue-pencil 
departments of the chains. Each pro- 
ducer has a couple of choice examples 
of how a network script clearance ex- 
ecutive read something into a scene 
that never was intended. And they'll 
trot them out without the slightest 
urging. 

"What's so frustrating about the net- 
works when scripts are held up, is 
that you can't argue intelligently with 
them,'" explained a Midwest program 
producer. "They look upon every per- 
former and director and producer 
aa out to get the network in trouble. 
You can't convince a web purist that 
all of us haven't perverted minds. 

"There was a time when every radio 
mother had to be good, loving, ever 
true. A mother could do no wrong. 
That block isn't on the clearance- 
department road any longer, but there 
are others just as unrealistic." 

Another producer explained that he 
had no quarrel with the tough com- 
mercial regulations at the networks. 
"I know, for instance, that I can't 
expect clearance on copy that states 
that mine is the best, the only good 
product of its kind. I know I can't 
claim that 'research proves it's best,' 
unless I can prove it. Regulations of 
this kind are good for broadcast adver- 
tising. Over-enthusiastic copy writers 
can really smoke some of the most 
amazing claims for products that I've 
ever read. 

"However, even regulation of broad- 
cast advertising can go too far. When 
it does, it's seldom because of network 
regulations but because the chain fears 
what another advertiser may do about 
his competitor's claims. We expect ad 
copy censorship. We fight for what we 
believe to be our clients' rights, but 
we're never sore when we can't clear 
claims." was this producer's parting 
shot. 

"A producer's job is to get programs 
on the air that build audiences who 
can be sold the sponsor's product." 
explains a Hollywood radio director. 
"We're not, for the most part, long- 
hair gentry but showmen with a flair 
for the commercial. We deliver audi- 
ences — or else we are delivered pink 
slips. The listening audience has dis- 
covered recently that we're in exist- 
ence, but even with the air-credits that 
(Please turn to page 46) 



IVobh-iii*. willi «li<*iii»» 

1. Most advertisers want to 1m* creative artists as well as 
business men 

2. Producers are not informed of the objective of broad- 
cast advertising 

3. Commercials are seldom okayed in time for produeers 
to make eertain that they do not clash with program 
content 

4. Sponsors don't listen to their broadcast programs 

5. Advertisers generally regard directors and producers 
as longhair out-of-this-world talent, instead of what 
most of them are, good businessmen 

6. Producers still have to fight for adequate air credit 



Problem* wilh ;i-<*ii< i<"- 



They're seldom run as established businesses but hire 
and discharge as their radio business fluctuates 



Agencies make it almost impossible for a radio dir- 
ector or producer to have direct contact with clients 

3. Many top radio executives at agencies have had no 
actual producing experience 

4. They follow successful trends like sheep 

5. The cli€*nt's word is usually law, be it right or wrong 

6. Even their transcription turntables are in run-down 
condition 

7. They frequently insist on casting programs by the 
way the talent looks 

8. They often admit that they "know nothing about 
radio," and still insist the program be done their 
way 



I'rohlcms with iiM-iliinii 

1. Network or station production men assigned to pro- 
grams are generally as useless as a mechanical pencil 
without lead 

2. Continuity acceptance departments of stations and 
networks are without imagination 

3. Most radio executives do not like advertising 

4. Programing is the ignored art of broadcast advertis- 
ing 

Broadcasting is generally more concerned with engi- 



5. 



neering than entertainment 



In an argument with top station or network men, pro- 
ducers don't win. 



31 JANUARY 1949 



Once a year , 



•an sink a fortune in a Kindle 
l»ro;i«l<;isl and Mill ionic out on lop 



Glitter and sentiment of Christinas 
and Thanksgiving; color and excite- 
ment <>! sports — the entire parade of 
holidays and "occasions" that can be 
hypoed and decked out in gala trim- 
mings to fascinate, amuse, and titillate 
the emotions of listeners — these are 
the glamour grist of the one-shot colu- 
mn rial broadcast. 

Properly planned and promoted, 
situations lending themselves lavishly 
to the glamorous touch can be made to 
pull tremendous audiences. 

The most frequent situations in 
which the one-shot has been used 
profitaliK are i I i to intensih selling 
pressure; (2) to do a special one-time 
job; (3) to take advantage of sudden 
breaks in the competitive picture; (4) 
to take advantage of a special occasion 
to build institutional prestige. 

One-shot commercial airings are 
most productive when called upon to 
do an immediate, specific job. They do 
even better when they supplement or 



introduce a continuing campaign. In 
some instances, an isolated one-time 
effort may be highly productive. Hut 
ordinarily it stands to lose potential 
value when not hooked into the mo- 
mentum of a regular campaign. 

The Nash-Kelvinator Corporation 
discovered recently, as have many 
sponsors before it, that a well-planned, 
well-promoted one-shot can pay off out 
of all proportion to its cost. Even so, 
such an effort is not necessarily low- 
cost. 

Prior to the presidential election last 
November, four aggressive sales or- 
ganizations had signed to underwrite 
the four national networks' coverage 
of the big event. Nash-Kelvinator 
bought the CBS package to announce 
their new model Nash car, while two 
other motor car manufacturers, Chev- 
rolet and Kaiser-Frazer, together with 
the Curtis Publishing Company, bought 
NBC, ABC, and Mutual network cover- 
age of the political event of the year. 

Nash paid $25,000 for the news 



package and S75.000 for the time. 
Even without the unlooked-for windfall 
of the all-night reporting, the deal w T as 
a natural. On what other occasion, 
Nash officials figured, could they 
achieve practically a saturation an- 
nouncement of a new car at a cost the 
board of directors would okay? 

With a different objective they could 
have bought, say, 26 CBS Saturday 
afternoon quarter-hours for approxi- 
mately the same money. Cost alone, 
however, is seldom the factor in de- 
ciding on a single broadcast. Radio- 
wise ad managers look first at their 
advertising objective, which normally 
has a long-range as well as immediate 
purpose. 

In this connection the spender of the 
advertising budget is conscious that as 
a rule the one-shot effort doesn't buy 
radio's most valuable asset: the listen- 
ing habit. He knows the habit of listen- 
is built only by consistent broadcasting 
in the same period, on the same days, 
month after month. 



Wrigley £2L a 



elebrating the 
CBS broadcast 



idays with a gala 
n Thanksgiving day 



Elgin 5?. 



ed its holiday tradition of two hour airings on NBC. 
ligns itself with the American Tradition of gift giving 




£-11 J CHANGE BLADES L7KE MM/C 




OXANGEBOH 

Sugar Bom 

vr *5_ *■» 



Elgin 



AmoriPOn com P dC,s sponsored Thanksgiving night party on 
HlllCllldll ABC-TV, first to celebrate the holidays on TV 



Gillette 



bought New Year's day Bowl Games to sell its "notched- 
bar" razor and blade dispenser to America's sports tans 



Only such phenomena as Franklin 
D. Roosevelt's fireside chats, VE Day, 
and a few other non-commercial events 
ever achieved virtually total saturation 
of listenership. But there are very fre- 
quent instances when local events come 
reasonably close. 

Even the four-way network coverage 
of the presidential election came much 
closer to giving the four sponsors satu- 
ration coverage than the four-way 
audience split indicates. Where pos- 
sible, most dialers sampled the report- 
ing of all four networks extensively be- 
fore finally settling down to one. 

One of the earliest national adver- 
tisers to cash in consistently on the 
sentiment and glamour of two of 
America's most tradition-laden holi- 
days was the Elgin National Watch 
Company. It sells more gift watches 



in the period between Thanksgiving 
and Christmas than at any other time 
during the year. 

Its Two Hours of Stars for six years 
on CBS sold Elgin watches on the 
Thanksgiving show from 4:00-6:00 
p.m., and at the same hours on Christ- 
mas day continued selling with terrific 
impact the idea of the Elgin, a tradi- 
tional American watch, as a part of the 
nations tradition, of which these two 
colorful holidays are a part. 

The Elgin Stars moved from CBS to 
NBC in 1948, while the William Wrig- 
ley, Jr. Company took over the CBS 
time on both Thanksgiving and Christ- 
mas, with an equally brilliant array of 
radio and film stars. 

The Elgin-NBC Thanksgiving and 
Christmas shows gathered Hooper rat- 
ings of 11 and 10, with share of audi- 



ence of 38.4 and 39. The Wrigley- 
CBS extravaganza rated 8.5 and 6.8. 
with share of audience 29.5 and 20.9. 

The Elgin American company, 
makers of compacts, cigarette cases, 
etc., aired its Holiday Star Vanities as 
a one-shot from 7:30-9:30 the evening 
of 25 November over five video sta- 
tions of the ABC television network, 
plus WCAU-TV, the CBS outlet in 
Fhiladephia (the ABC video outlet in 
Philadelphia is WFIL). The show was 
so well-merchandised ahead of the tele- 
cast that the New York market alone 
took enough merchandise to under- 
write the entire cost before the show 
went on. 

The show's cost — including time, 
talent, and production — was $40,000. 
It racked up an audience of viewers in 
(Please turn to page 68) 



Sports shop; R 



ed Bluffs, California, sponsored the local high school 
rtet in pre-Christmas series of carols over KBLF 



r Curtis publications 



brought election night coverage on MBS 
to impress dialers with its magazines 

























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Singin' Sam 

the man behind over 200 Successful sales curves 

For the sponsor interested in sales. Siiigin' Sam presents a unique < 
opportunity. For never in radio's history has there been a personality 
like Sam . . • never hefore a program series with such an outstanding | 
reeord of major sales successes unbroken by a single failure. 
These are strong statements that carrv tremendous weight with 
prospective program purchasers ... if supported by facts. And j 
facts we have in abundance . . . high Hoopers, congratulatory letters. ! 
expressions of real appreciation by advertisers themselves, actual 


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34 



SPONSOR 



>^e Swing is toWB mKansasQ^ 




THE 1949 SWING GIRL 
Miss Vera Ralstoa 




'TpO reach more people, for 
less money, broadcast 
your advertising message 
over the station with Kansas 
City's oldest call letters— 
WHB. Powerful WHB 
blankets 3V2 million buyers 
in 133 counties of 6 states 
with good, listenable enter- 
tainment 19 hours a day. 
WHB cost less, does more. 
See your John Blair man. 



10,000 WATTS IN KANS4 



DON DAVIS w 

u$m " ,s,ofNr 2 

JOHN T. SCHILLING _^ 

GfNffAl MANAGM ^£ 

JOHN BLAIR & CO. 



PGB 



MUTUAL NETWORK • 710 KILOCYCLES • 5.000 WATTS NIGHT 



36 



40 West 52nd 



(Continued from page 4) 

lion job. At least some broadcasters 
might be tempted to add two and two 
and get five! 

This is not a complaint because 
somebody lost an account. It happens 
every week in the year and keeps sales- 
men on their toes. Nor is it an indict- 
ment of agency and client requests for 
station promotion. You know I be- 
lieve that stations should do more, 
rather than less, promotion of national 
accounts, and that my business is based 
upon the theory that the better promo- 
tional job I do for m\ stations the bet- 
ter selling job their reps and networks 
will do for them. I'm on Hal Davis' 
side. 

Bob Keller 

President 

Robert S. Keller, New York 



THE BANK STORY 

In your issue of October or Novem- 
ber you published a pictorial three- 
page story of the steps involving our 
client, the National Shawmut Bank of 
Boston, negotiating their TV show 
with WBZ-TV. 

Is it practical to ask if we could 
order reprints, or purchase some part 
of 35 copies of this issue? 

We find a growing interest in TV 
among our commercial, savings banks, 
and investment clients in the medim. 
and it would he very useful if we were 
able to use this spread for a sales pro- 
motional mailing. 

Louis W. Munro 

Vice President 

Doremus & Co., New York 

SPONSOR .it present does not reprint articles but 
had 20 copies available for Mr. Munro. 



CAKE AND BREAD STORY 

We are very interested in receiving 
a copy of the April 1947 issue of 
sponsor. It was in this issue that 
you bad your story Continental Cake 
and Bread Story. If you cannot supply 
ii- with that issue, reprints of the ar- 
ticle will be more than satisfactory. 
Please bill us for anv expense. 

Robert F. LaRue 
icct. Exec 

H olden. Clifford. Flint. Inc. 
Detroit 

Sonic back iifUM are still available. We were 
happy to have been able to handle Mr. I*aRue's 
request. 

SPONSOR 



* 



Ask 



your national representative 

You're on the verge of a decision, and 

a problem. What trade papers to 
piek for your station promotion? 

It's no problem to kiss off, for 

your ehoice can have a 
telling efFeet on your national 

spot income. But where to get 

the facts? The answer is simple. 
Ask your national representative. 

He knows. His salesmen get around. 
They learn which trade papers are appreciated, read 
and discussed by buyers of broadcast time. 
His is an expert opinion. 
Don't overlook your national representative. 



SPONSOR 



For Buyers of Broadcast Advertising 



31 JANUARY 1949 



37 




Mr. Sponsor asks... 



"Is it possible to produce television film commercials 
so that they are equally effective on both larjje and 



Stanley M. Abrams 



Sales Promotion Manager 
Emerson Radio and Phonograph 



*wf 



The 

I*i4*k<3 h «l PaiM'fi 
answoB°« 
>lr. AE»i s «iiiik 

^^^^^ Technically, 

jm B^ pi oduction ol I \ 

film commercials 
^p i> simple. Scenes 
1*g± -5CT" mL must be photo- 
H^ graphed with 
tf~.-~> screen size in 

mind. The aver- 
age receiver has 
a 1 0-inch screen; 
therefore, all 
long shuts should he eliminated wher- 
evei possible. This fundamental rule 
should apply to any object from an 
automobile to a bottle of beer. 

Allowances must also be made for 
the inside dimensions of the lube, so 
that the image does not "bleed" of! the 
picture area, either top or bottom. Still 
another factor to be considered is the 
fane) mountings some receivers have 
around the screen, thus cutting off a 
portion of the imagt 

No matter what size screen is in- 
volved, proper exposure plus balanced 
lighting are vital to good T\ com- 
mercials. Heavy, dark areas should he 
avoided because of then tendency to 
"flare". Whites and greys, plus a trans- 
parent black area on the film, if neces- 
sary, are besl suited to television re- 
production. 

I In- biggesl problem is the restric- 
tion of time of a film commercial to 
one minute. In lOmm film ihi- means 

36 feet of film. For an) scene to 



register or carry a message, each scene 
is allotted approximately four feet, 
allowing nine short scenes in which to 
get over the advertising message. 

It's apparent, then, that ingenuity 
and originality must play the greatest 
part in presenting a commercial that 
has punch and selling strength, as well 
as a palatable acceptability to the TV 
audience. 

Spoken copy accompanying a film 
commercial is also highh important. 
It must not be rushed. The oral copy 
must be timed very carefully to allow 
for roughly 12 seconds of copy to 
every 20 feet of film. 

Roy Meredith 
Production Manager 
WCAU-TV, Philadelphia 



It is a question 
of proportions. 
By that I mean a 
close-up on a 
seven-inch screen 
would be a close- 
up also on a 15- 
inch screen, or 
the proportions 
w o u 1 d be the 
same. However, I 

feel it would be better to sustain the 
sequence longer if the commercial is 
specifically produced for a small 
screen. The reason for this is that the 
smaller the screen, the more eye strain 

for the \ieuer. Therefore, a series of 

rapid scene changes is uncomfortable 
to look at. and not enough time is 

allowed loi the message to sink in. 

1 think a good rule for comnieri ial 
script writers to follow is to keep the 

i ommercial simple: the above rule goes 




double if the script is being propared 
for small screen receivers only. How- 
ever, I believe it is a good rule to fol- 
low for all size receivers. 

Many commercials on television to- 
day are nothing but a series of fast 
wipes. cut~. and dissolves, with as many 
as 15 to 20 scene changes in a minute. 
If the people who prepare these com- 
mercials would give a little study to 
the human eye, they would find out 
that the focus of the eye changes for 
each scene. If ten minutes of this 
technique were used, the viewer would 
wind up b\ bouncing the television set 
on the floor. Keep it simple. 
Bud Gamble 
Gamble Productions, N. Y. 



If television's 
visual commer- 
cials are done 
with a reason- 
ably intelligent 
use of the printed 
word as a selling 
agent, there is no 
necessih oi rea- 
son for them to 
be produced dif- 
ferently for the various sizes of TV 
set screens now on the market. 

Size of the screen should be no con- 
sideration in the projection of a nor- 
mal advertising message via TV. Only 
pool oi improper handling of a com- 
mercial will impair its effectiveness, 
and then the damage is equally evident 
on a 20-inch or a 7-inch screen. 

Hi and names and trademarks, unless 
improhahlx unwieldy and long, should 
be ahle to he viewed on the smallest 
screen (even the 3-inch type now avail- 
aide in portable sets) as on any larger 




38 



SPONSOR 



ADVERTISEMENT 



size, short of a full theatre screen. Only 
in the matter of lengthy slogans or 
involved sales messages is screen size 
important, and in these cases the same 
application of hasic newspaper or 
magazine ad copy principles as regards 
amount of wordage relative to allotted 
space is necessary. 

But under ordinary circumstances 
any TV commercial planned for the 
average screen will he as effective on 
small or large sets. And it must also 
be remembered that for correct TV 
viewing audience distance from the 
screen should be equivalent in feet to 
the size of the tube in inches. Pro- 
portionatelv, therefore, there is virtu- 
ally little difference in image size to 
the person with normal eyesight. 
C. J. Durban 

Assistant Advertising Director 
V. S. Rubber Co., N. Y. 



As long as sim- 
plicity of picto- 
rial composition 
is observed, no 
differentiation of 
technique for 
large and small 
screens need 
enter production 
plans, for in the 
final analysis the 
proportions are determined by one's 
distance from the screen. 

From the standpoint of composition, 
the normal loss of pictorial values in 
transmission from studio to receiver 
should be carefully considered. With 
that in mind, and by utilizing the 
greatest economy of composition pos- 
sible, video producers can make their 
sales messages attractive and highlv 
effective on any and every set. 
Roger Pryor 
Director of Television 
Foote, Cone & Belding, N. Y. 



The answer to 
the problem of 
producing tele- 
vision commer- 
cials, title cards, 
credits, and so 
on. so that they 
contain the same 
degree of effec- 
tiveness on both 
small and large 
screens seems to me to be self-evident. 
It is simply this: Any proficient han- 
( Please turn to page 42) 





Oeuv Joe: 



This is the second in our series 
of Sponsor ads, and I wonder what 
reaction you noticed from our first. 
We received three calls from local 
agencies, all of which were fav- 
orable, but they know all about 
WM IE-Miami anyway. 

I had a big thrill in early Janu- 
ary, Joe, that certainly proves the 
point that in broadcast adver- 
tising, it's the program and adver- 
tising copy that count. 

Electric Sales and Appliances, 
the South Florida area Philco dis- 
tributor, has been a top account 
with us since the first week we went 
on the air. Through their guid- 
ance, some thirty-three Philco 
dealers are also appreciated 
WMIE-Miami advertisers. The 
point is though, Joe, that Earl 
Crawford, Man- 
ager of the dis- 
tri but or ship, 
told us prior to 
signing his first 
WMIE contract 
that "radio ad- 
vertising didn't 
work in Miami" 
and he had tried 
three stations to 
prove it. Truth of the matter is it 
wasn't the stations, but it must have 
been a poor choice of program 
material and talent. 

We sold him on "one more 
trial" and he bought the University 
of Miami football games from us 
as a Philco exclusive. The results, 
I'm happy to say were exceptional 
—but, of course, it's because the 
vehicle was right. As you know, 
we had a Hooper made of one 
game which gave us 38.9% of the 
radio audience, and our next near- 
est competitor had only a little 
more than half this total. And 
this was on a night when one sta- 
tion bucked us with Band of 
America, Jimmy Durante, Eddie 
Cantor. Red Skelton and Life ot 




Riley. Our 38.9 was overall for 
the entire two and one-half hour 
period. 

Mr. Crawford told us that his 
sales to retailers increased each 
week in precise accordance with 
the items he selected for special 
treatment during each week's 
game. Bill Scheetz, our play-by- 
play man whom we think has no 
peer, sent a weekly letter to all 
Philco dealers in advance of each 
game which helped them stock up 
on items to be featured during the 
next broadcast. 

Now r , here's where the January 
thrill comes in: The occasion was 
the national Philco distributors' 
convention held in Palm Beach. 
Mrs. Venn and I were invited to 
attend the meeting of several days, 
and we saw our Philco account. 
Electric Sales and Appliances of 
Miami, receive the national first 
award for total sales per capita, 
first prize in the Southeast for 
sales, and first prize for service. 

Of course, we know WMIE 
didn't have near as much to do 
with these sales attainments as 
Earl Crawford would have us be- 
lieve, but we like to think we 
helped. 

We do know our handling of 
this client was notworthy. Our 
commercial announcer, Joe Wor- 
thy (formerly of Selznick Studios 
in Hollywood) was a good sales- 
man, Bill Scheetz gave the fans 
the kind of play-by-play report- 
ing they enjoyed, and the games 
were just right for the product. 
This combination simply pays off. 

The distributor and the dealers 
know WMIE was effective and 
most important of all, that "radio 
in Miami will work — and work 
extremely well." 

CordialK . 



31 JANUARY 1949 



39 




<*M 



Albuquerque 






KOB 




\H(. 


Beaumont 






KFDM 




ABC 


Boise 






KDSH 




CBS 


Boston-Springfi 


eld 




WBZ-WBZA 


NBC 


Buffalo 






WGR 




CBS 


Charleston, S. 


• 




WCSC 




CBS 


Columbia, S. C. 




WIS 




NBC 


Corpus Christi 






KRIS 




NBC 


Davenport 






woe 




NBC 


Des Moines 






WHO 




NBC 


Denver 






KVOD 




ABC 


Duluth 






WDSM 




ABC 


h'urfiii 






WDAY 




NBC 


Ft. Wayne 






WOWO 




ABC 


Ft. Worth-Dallas 




WBAP 




ABC-NBC 


Honolulu-Ililo 






KGMB-KHBC 


CBS 


Houston 






KXYZ 




ABC 


Indianapolis 






WISH 




ABC 


Kansas City 






KMBC-KFRM 


CBS 


Louisville 






WAVE 




NBC 


Milwaukee 






WMAW 




ABC 


Minneapolis-St. 


Pa 


ul 


WTCN 




ABC 


New York 






WMCA 




IND 


Norfolk 






WGH 




ABC 


Omaha 






KFAB 




CBS 


Peoria-Tuscola 






WMBD-WDZ 


CBS 


Philadelphia 






KYW 




NBC 


Pittsburgh 






KDKA 




NBC 


Portland, Ore. 






KEX 




ABC 


Raleigh 






WPTF 




NBC 


Koannkc 






WDBJ 




CBS 


San Diego 






KCBQ 




CBS 


St. Louis 






KSD 




NBC 


Seattle 






KIRO 




CBS 


Syracuse 






WFBL 




CBS 


I'M. Haute 






WTHI 
Television 




ABC 




Ba 


i iiiiuii' 




WAAM 






Ft 


Worth-D 


alias 


WBAP-TV 






Louisville 




WAVE-TV 






Minneapolis 


St. Paul 


WTCN-TV 






New York 




\\ l'l\ 






St. 


Louis 




KSD-TV 





40 



SPONSOR 




* 






tiNTI 




RADIO 






E- 



everyone wants to win customers and 
influence people. But